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Leżajsk
Leżajsk
Leżajsk
[ˈlɛʐai̯sk] (full name The Free Royal City of Leżajsk, Polish: Wolne Królewskie Miasto Leżajsk; Ukrainian: Лежайськ, Lezhais’k; Yiddish: ליזשענסק-Lizhensk‎) is a town in southeastern Poland
Poland
with 13,871 inhabitants.[2] It has been situated in the Subcarpathian Voivodship since 1999 and is the capital of Leżajsk
Leżajsk
County. Leżajsk
Leżajsk
is famed for its Bernadine basilica and monastery, built by the architect Antonio Pellacini. The basilica contains a highly regarded pipe organ from the second half of the 17th century and organ recitals take place there. It stands as one of Poland's official national Historic Monuments (Pomnik historii), as designated April 20, 2005, and tracked by the National Heritage Board of Poland. Leżajsk is also home of the Leżajsk
Leżajsk
brewery
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Voivodeships Of Poland
A województwo ([vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ]; plural: województwa) is the highest-level administrative subdivision of Poland, corresponding to a "province" in many other countries. The term "województwo" has been in use since the 14th century, and is commonly translated in English as "province".[1] Województwo is also rendered in English by "voivodeship" (/ˈvɔɪvoʊdʃɪp/) or a variant spelling.[2] The Polish local government reforms
Polish local government reforms
adopted in 1998, which went into effect on 1 January 1999, created sixteen new voivodeships. These replaced the 49 former voivodeships that had existed from 1 July 1975, and bear greater resemblance (in territory but not in name) to the voivodeships that existed between 1950 and 1975. Today's voivodeships are mostly named after historical and geographical regions, while those prior to 1998 generally took their names from the cities on which they were centered
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Deluge (history)
The term Deluge (Polish: pоtор szwedzki, Lithuanian: švedų tvanas) denotes a series of mid-17th-century campaigns in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
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Hasidic Judaism
Hasidism, sometimes Hasidic Judaism
Judaism
(Hebrew: חסידות‎, translit. hasidut, [χaˈsidus]; originally, "piety"), is a Jewish religious group. It arose as a spiritual revival movement in contemporary Western Ukraine
Western Ukraine
during the 18th century, and spread rapidly throughout Eastern Europe. Today, most affiliates reside in the United States, Israel, and the United Kingdom. Israel
Israel
Ben Eliezer, the " Baal Shem
Baal Shem
Tov", is regarded as its founding father, and his disciples developed and disseminated it. Present-day Hasidism is a sub-group within Ultra-Orthodox ("Haredi") Judaism, and is noted for its religious conservatism and social seclusion
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Einsatzgruppen
Einsatzgruppen[a] (German: [ˈʔaɪnzatsˌɡʁʊpn̩], "task forces"[1] or "deployment groups")[2] were Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS) paramilitary death squads of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
that were responsible for mass killings, primarily by shooting, during World War II
World War II
(1939–45). The Einsatzgruppen
Einsatzgruppen
were involved in the murder of much of the intelligentsia and cultural elite of Poland, and had an integral role in the implementation of the so-called Final solution to the Jewish question (Die Endlösung der Judenfrage) in territories conquered by Nazi Germany
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Lviv
Lviv
Lviv
(Ukrainian: Львів [lʲʋiu̯] ( listen); Russian: Львов Lvov; Polish: Lwów[2] [lvuf] ( listen); German: Lemberg; see also other names) is the largest city in western Ukraine and the seventh-largest city in the country overall, with a population of around 728,350 as of 2016. Lviv
Lviv
is one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine. Named in honor of Leo, the eldest son of Daniel, King of Ruthenia, it was the capital of the Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
(also called Kingdom of Rus')[3] from 1272 to 1349, when it was conquered by King Casimir III the Great
Casimir III the Great
who then became known as the King of Poland
Poland
and Rus'. From 1434, it was the regional capital of the Ruthenian Voivodeship in the Kingdom of Poland
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Sigismund I The Old
Sigismund I of Poland
Poland
(Polish: Zygmunt I Stary, Lithuanian: Žygimantas I Senasis; 1 January 1467 – 1 April 1548), of the Jagiellon dynasty, reigned as King of Poland
King of Poland
and also as the Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1506 until 1548. Earlier, Sigismund had been invested as Duke of Silesia. A successful monarch and a great patron of arts, he established Polish suzerainty over Ducal Prussia (East Prussia) and incorporated the duchy of Mazovia into the Polish state, securing the nation's wealth, culture and power. Sigismund I, the fifth son of Casimir IV and Elisabeth of Habsburg, had ruled Głogów, Silesia, since 1499 and became margrave of Lusatia and governor of all Silesia in 1504. In a short time his judicial and administrative reforms transformed those territories into model states. He succeeded his brother Alexander I as grand prince of Lithuania and king of Poland
Poland
in 1506
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Sigismund II Augustus
Sigismund II Augustus
Sigismund II Augustus
(Polish: Zygmunt II August, Ruthenian: Żygimont II Awgust, Lithuanian: Žygimantas II Augustas, German: Sigismund II. August) (1 August 1520 – 7 July 1572) was the King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania, the only son of Sigismund I the Old, whom Sigismund II succeeded in 1548. Married three times, the last of the Jagiellons
Jagiellons
remained childless, and through the Union of Lublin introduced a free elective monarchy.Contents1 Royal titles 2 Biography 3 Patronage 4 Ancestry 5 Marriages 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksRoyal titles[edit]Royal titles, in Latin: "Sigismundus Augustus Dei gratia rex Poloniae, magnus dux Lithuaniae, nec non-terrarum Cracoviae, Sandomiriae, Siradiae, Lanciciae, Cuiaviae, Kiioviae, Dominus Hereditarium Russiae, Woliniae, Prussiae, Masoviae, Podlachiae, Culmensis, Elbingensis, Pomeraniae, Samogitiae, Livoniae etc
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Starosta
The title of starost or starosta (Cyrillic: старост/а, Latin: capitaneus, German: Starost) designates an official or unofficial leader, used in various contexts through most of Slavic history. One can translate it as "senior" or "elder". The word comes from the Slavic root star-, "old". In Poland, a starosta would administer a territory called a starostwo. In the early Middle Ages, the starosta was the head of a Slavic community or of other communities so one finds designations such as church starosta, artel starosta, etc
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Odrowaz Coat Of Arms
Abratowicz, Ambroch, Aramowicz, Augustynowicz. B Baftałowski, Baranowski, Bębnowski, Białaczewicz, Białaczewski, Białaczowski, Białeczewicz, Bielawski, Bilicz, Blaszkowski, Bleżowski, Błaszkowicki, Błaszkowicz, Błaszkowiecki, Błażejewicz, Błażejewski, Błażejowicz, Błażejowski, Błażyjewski, Bobrownicki, Bogorajski, Boguszewicz, Bohuryński, Bohuszewicz, Brachowski, Brózdowski, Buczkowski, Burchacki, Burkacki, Bylina. C Cedroński, Cedrowski, Chancłowicz, Chaustowicz, Chlewicki, Chociaszewski, Chociszewski, Chodecki, Cholticz, Chomiński, Chomski, Chreptowicz, Chwałkowski, Ciński, Ciżewski, Ciżowski, Cyński, Czechowski, Czelo, Czykiński, Czykliński. D Dąbieński, Dembiński, Dębieński, Dębiński, Domański, Dowojnowicz, Duracz, Durasiewicz, Durasowicz, Duraszewicz, Duroszewicz, Dziewiatyński, Dziewiątl. E Egrodzyński, Endwiłł. F Falconie, Falk, Falkonis, Falkoński, Ferber, Forst, Forsth, Funger. G Gałka, Gedmin, Getowc, Giedmin, Gietowć, Gietowt,
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Przeworsk
Przeworsk
Przeworsk
[ˈpʂɛvɔrsk], (Ukrainian: Переворськ, translit. Perevors'k, Yiddish: פּרשעוואָרסק‎, translit. Prshevorsk) is a town in south-eastern Poland
Poland
with 15,675 inhabitants, as of 2 June 2009.[1] Since 1999 it has been in the Subcarpathian Voivodeship, and is the capital of Przeworsk
Przeworsk
County. The ancient Przeworsk culture
Przeworsk culture
was named after the town. Przeworsk
Przeworsk
was a settlement since the 10th century, though evidence of human settlement in the general area is even older. It is first mentioned in historical records from the 13th century, and was granted its town charter in 1394. From 1772 the town was part of the Habsburg Monarchy where it remained until 1918 when an independent Poland
Poland
was created
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Crimean Tatars
Crimean Tatars
Tatars
(Crimean Tatar: Qırımtatarlar, Turkish: Kırım Tatarları, Russian: Крымские Татары, Ukrainian: Кримськi Татари) are a Turkic ethnic group that formed in the Crimean Peninsula
Crimean Peninsula
during the 13th–17th centuries, primarily from the Turkic tribes that moved to the land now known as Crimea
Crimea
in Eastern Europe from the Asian steppes beginning in the 10th century, with contributions from the pre-Cuman population of Crimea. Since 2014 Crimean Tatars
Tatars
were officially recognized as indigenous peoples of Ukraine.[10] Following the 2014 Russian annexation of Crimea, Russian authorities recognized Mejlis of the Crimean Tatar People
Mejlis of the Crimean Tatar People
as an extremist organization, and banned it in 26 April 2016
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Partitions Of Poland
The Partitions of Poland[nb 1] were three partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
that took place towards the end of the 18th century and ended the existence of the state, resulting in the elimination of sovereign Poland
Poland
and Lithuania
Lithuania
for 123 years. The partitions were conducted by Habsburg Austria, the Kingdom of Prussia, and the Russian Empire, which divided up the Commonwealth lands among themselves progressively in the process of territorial seizures and annexations.[1][2][3][4] The First Partition of Poland
Poland
was decided on August 5, 1772. Two decades later, Russian and Prussian troops entered the Commonwealth again and the Second Partition was signed on January 23, 1793. Austria did not participate in the Second Partition
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Jew
Jews
Jews
(Hebrew: יְהוּדִים‬ ISO 259-3 Yehudim, Israeli pronunciation [jehuˈdim]) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group[12] and a nation[13][14][15] originating from the Israelites,[16][17][18] or Hebrews,[19][20] of the Ancient Near East. Jewish ethnicity, nationhood, and religion are strongly interrelated,[21] as
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Habsburg Empire
The Habsburg Monarchy
Monarchy
(German: Habsburgermonarchie) or Empire is an unofficial appellation among historians for the countries and provinces that were ruled by the junior Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg between 1521 and 1780 and then by the successor branch of Habsburg-Lorraine
Habsburg-Lorraine
until 1918. The Monarchy
Monarchy
was a composite state composed of territories within and outside the Holy Roman Empire, united only in the person of the monarch. The dynastic capital was Vienna, except from 1583 to 1611,[2] when it was moved to Prague
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Galicia (Eastern Europe)
Galicia (Ukrainian and Rusyn: Галичина, Halyčyna; Polish: Galicja; Czech and Slovak: Halič; German: Galizien; Hungarian: Galícia/Kaliz/Gácsország/Halics; Romanian: Galiția/Halici; Russian: Галиция, Galicija; Yiddish: גאַליציע‎ Galitsiye) is a historical and geographic region in Central Europe[1][2][3] once a small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, that straddled the modern-day border between Poland
Poland
and Ukraine
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