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Lavondyss
Lavondyss
Lavondyss
also titled Lavondyss: Journey to an Unknown Region is a fantasy novel by British writer Robert Holdstock, the second book in his Mythago Wood
Mythago Wood
series
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Taliesin
Taliesin
Taliesin
(fl. 6th century AD; /ˌtæliˈɛsɪn/; Welsh pronunciation: [talˈjɛsɪn]) was an early Brythonic poet of Sub-Roman Britain
Sub-Roman Britain
whose work has possibly survived in a Middle Welsh manuscript, the Book of Taliesin
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John Clute
John Frederick Clute (born 12 September 1940)[1] is a Canadian-born author and critic specializing in science fiction (also SF, sf) and fantasy literature who has lived in both England
England
and the United States since 1969. He has been described as "an integral part of science fiction's history"[2] and "perhaps the foremost reader-critic of sf in our time, and one of the best the genre has ever known."[3] He was one of eight people who founded the English magazine Interzone in 1982[2] (the others including Malcolm Edwards, Colin Greenland, Roz Kaveney, and David Pringle). Clute's articles on speculative fiction have appeared in various publications since the 1960s. He is a co-editor of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (with Peter Nicholls) and of The Encyclopedia of Fantasy (with John Grant), as well as writing The Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Science Fiction, all of which won Hugo Awards for Best Non-Fiction
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Shamanism
Shamanism
Shamanism
is a practice that involves a practitioner reaching altered states of consciousness in order to perceive and interact with a spirit world and channel these transcendental energies into this world.[1] A shaman (/ˈʃɑːmən/ SHAH-men) is someone who is regarded as having access to, and influence in, the world of benevolent and malevolent spirits, who typically enters into a trance state during a ritual, and practices divination and healing.[2] The word "shaman" probably originates from the Tungusic E
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Welsh People
The Welsh (Welsh: Cymry) are a nation and ethnic group native to, or otherwise associated with, Wales, Welsh culture, Welsh history, and the Welsh language. The language, which falls within the Insular Celtic family, has historically been spoken throughout Wales, with its predecessor Common Brittonic
Common Brittonic
once spoken throughout most of the island of Great Britain. Prior to the 20th century, large numbers of Welsh people spoke only Welsh, with little or no fluent knowledge of English.[13] Welsh remains the predominant language in parts of Wales, particularly in North Wales
Wales
and West Wales, but English is the predominant language in most parts of the country
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Anthropology
Anthropology
Anthropology
is the study of humans and human behaviour and societies in the past and present.[1][2][3] Social anthropology
Social anthropology
and cultural anthropology[1][2][3] study the norms and values of societies.
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Oxford University
Coordinates: 51°45′40″N 1°15′12″W / 51.7611°N 1.2534°W / 51.7611; -1.2534University of OxfordCoat of armsLatin: Universitas OxoniensisMotto Dominus Illuminatio Mea (Latin)Motto in English"The Lord is my Light"Established c. 1096; 922 years ago (1096)[1]Endowment £5.069 billion (inc
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Deer
Deer
Deer
(singular and plural) are the ruminant mammals forming the family Cervidae. The two main groups are the Cervinae, including the muntjac, the elk (wapiti), the fallow deer and the chital, and the Capreolinae, including the reindeer (caribou), the roe deer and the moose. Female reindeer, and male deer of all species (except the Chinese water deer), grow and shed new antlers each year
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Mordred
Mordred
Mordred
or Modred (/ˈmoʊdrɛd/; Welsh: Medrawt) is a character in the Arthurian legend, known as a notorious traitor who fought King Arthur at the Battle of Camlann, where he was killed and Arthur was fatally wounded.Contents1 Name 2 Early depictions 3 Later depictions 4 Family4.1 Offspring5 In later works 6 See also 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksName[edit] The name Mordred
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King Arthur
King Arthur
Arthur
is a legendary British leader who, according to medieval histories and romances, led the defence of Britain against Saxon invaders in the late 5th and early 6th centuries AD. The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and his historical existence is debated and disputed by modern historians.[2] The sparse historical background of Arthur
Arthur
is gleaned from various sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Historia Brittonum, and the writings of Gildas. Arthur's name also occurs in early poetic sources such as Y Gododdin.[3] Arthur
Arthur
is a central figure in the legends making up the Matter of Britain
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Michael D. C. Drout
Michael D. C. Drout (born 1968) is Professor of English and Director of the Center for the Study of the Medieval at Wheaton College. He is an author and editor specializing in Anglo-Saxon and medieval literature, science fiction and fantasy, especially the works of J. R. R. Tolkien and Ursula K. Le Guin. Drout holds a Ph.D. in English from Loyola University Chicago
Loyola University Chicago
(May 1997), an M.A. in English from the University of Missouri
University of Missouri
(May 1993), an M.A. in Communication from Stanford University
Stanford University
(May 1991), and a B.A
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Braille
This audio file was created from a revision of the article "Braille" dated 2006-09-06, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. (Audio help) More spoken articles Braille
Braille
(/breɪl/; French: [bʁaj]) is a tactile writing system used by people who are visually impaired. It is traditionally written with embossed paper. Braille
Braille
users can read computer screens and other electronic supports thanks to refreshable braille displays. They can write braille with the original slate and stylus or type it on a braille writer, such as a portable braille notetaker or computer that prints with a braille embosser. Braille
Braille
is named after its creator, Louis Braille, a Frenchman who lost his sight as a result of a childhood accident. In 1824, at the age of fifteen, he developed a code for the French alphabet
French alphabet
as an improvement on night writing
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Morris Dance
Morris
Morris
dance is a form of English folk dance usually accompanied by music. It is based on rhythmic stepping and the execution of choreographed figures by a group of dancers, usually wearing bell pads on their shins. Implements such as sticks, swords and handkerchiefs may also be wielded by the dancers
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Green Man
A Green Man
Green Man
is a sculpture or other representation of a face surrounded by or made from leaves. Branches or vines may sprout from the mouth, nostrils, or other parts of the face and these shoots may bear flowers or fruit. Commonly used as a decorative architectural ornament, Green Men are frequently found in carvings on both secular and ecclesiastical buildings. "The Green Man" is also a popular name for English public houses and various interpretations of the name appear on inn signs, which sometimes show a full figure rather than just the head. The Green Man
Green Man
motif has many variations. Found in many cultures from many ages around the world, the Green Man
Green Man
is often related to natural vegetative deities. It is primarily interpreted as a symbol of rebirth, representing the cycle of growth each spring
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Neolithic
farming, animal husbandry pottery, metallurgy, wheel circular ditches, henges, megaliths Neolithic
Neolithic
religion↓ ChalcolithicThe Neolithic
Neolithic
(/ˌniːəˈlɪθɪk/ ( listen)[1]) was a period in the development of human technology, beginning about 10,200 BC, according to the ASPRO chronology, in some parts of the Middle East, and later in other parts of the world[2] and ending between 4500 and 2000 BC. Traditionally considered the last part of the Stone Age
Stone Age
or The New Stone Age, the Neolithic
Neolithic
followed the terminal Holocene
Holocene
Epipaleolithic period and commenced with the beginning of farming, which produced the " Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution"
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Celts
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle Dnieper Bronze
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