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Kimigayo
"Kimigayo" (君が代, [kimiꜜɡajo]; His Imperial Majesty's Reign) is the national anthem of Japan. Its lyrics are the oldest among the world's national anthems, and with a length of 11 measures and 32 characters "Kimigayo" is also one of the world's shortest. Its lyrics are from a waka poem written in the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185),[1] and the current melody was chosen in 1880, replacing an unpopular melody composed eleven years earlier. While the title "Kimigayo" is usually translated as "His Imperial Majesty's Reign", no official translation of the title or lyrics has been established in law.[2] From 1888 to 1945 "Kimigayo" served as the national anthem of the Empire of Japan. When the Empire was dissolved following its surrender at the end of World War II, the State of Japan
Japan
succeeded it in 1945
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Occupation Of Japan
A job, or occupation, is a person's role in society. More specifically, a job is an activity, often regular and often performed in exchange for payment ("for a living"). Many people have multiple jobs (e.g., parent, homemaker, and employee). A person can begin a job by becoming an employee, volunteering, starting a business, or becoming a parent. The duration of a job may range from temporary (e.g., hourly odd jobs) to a lifetime (e.g., judges). An activity that requires a person's mental or physical effort is work (as in "a day's work"). If a person is trained for a certain type of job, they may have a profession. Typically, a job would be a subset of someone's career
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Mandate Of Heaven
The Mandate of Heaven
Heaven
or Tin Ming, Tian
Tian
Ming (Chinese: 天命; pinyin: Tiānmìng; Wade–Giles: T'ien-ming) and in various dialectal spellings, is a Chinese political and religious doctrine used since ancient times to justify the rule of the Emperor of China. According to this belief, heaven (天, Tian)—which embodies the natural order and will of the universe—bestows the mandate on a just ruler of China, the "Heavenly Son" of the "Celestial Empire". If a ruler was overthrown, this was interpreted as an indication that the ruler was unworthy, and had lost the mandate
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Kamakura Period
The Kamakura
Kamakura
period (鎌倉時代, Kamakura
Kamakura
jidai, 1185–1333) is a period of Japanese history that marks the governance by the Kamakura shogunate, officially established in 1192 in Kamakura
Kamakura
by the first shōgun, Minamoto no Yoritomo
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Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Satsuma Domain
Satsuma Domain
Satsuma Domain
(薩摩藩, Satsuma-han), also known as Kagoshima Domain, was a Japanese domain of the Edo
Edo
period. It is associated with the provinces of Satsuma, Ōsumi and Hyūga in modern-day Kagoshima Prefecture and Miyazaki Prefecture
Miyazaki Prefecture
on the island of Kyūshū. In the han system, Satsuma was a political and economic abstraction based on periodic cadastral surveys and projected agricultural yields.[1] In other words, the domain was defined in terms of kokudaka, not land area.[2] This was different from the feudalism of the West. The domain was ruled from Kagoshima
Kagoshima
Castle in Kagoshima
Kagoshima
city
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Shimazu Clan
The Shimazu clan
Shimazu clan
(島津氏, Shimazu-shi) were the daimyō of the Satsuma han, which spread over Satsuma, Ōsumi and Hyūga provinces in Japan. The Shimazu were identified as one of the tozama or outsider daimyō families[1] in contrast with the fudai or insider clans which were hereditary vassals or allies of the Tokugawa clan.Contents1 History 2 Simplified family tree 3 Order of Succession 4 Other Members 5 Important Retainers 6 Popular culture 7 See also 8 Notes 9 ReferencesHistory[edit]Grave of Shimazu family at Mount Koya.The Shimazu were descendants of the Seiwa Genji
Seiwa Genji
branch of the Minamoto
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Yokohama
Yokohama
Yokohama
(Japanese: 横浜, Hepburn: Yokohama, pronounced [jokoꜜhama] ( listen)) is the second largest city in Japan by population, after Tokyo, and the most populous municipality of Japan. It is the capital city of Kanagawa Prefecture. It lies on Tokyo Bay, south of Tokyo, in the Kantō region
Kantō region
of the main island of Honshu. It is a major commercial hub of the Greater Tokyo
Tokyo
Area. Yokohama's population of 3.7 million makes it Japan's largest city after the special wards of Tokyo
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Sovereign
Sovereignty
Sovereignty
is the full right and power of a governing body over itself, without any interference from outside sources or bodies
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Hiromu Nonaka
Hiromu Nonaka
Hiromu Nonaka
(野中 廣務, Nonaka Hiromu, October 20, 1925 – January 26, 2018) was a Japanese LDP politician. He served as a local politician from 1951 to 1978 and in the House of Representatives from 1983 to 2003, becoming one of its most prominent members in the 1990s. He served as Minister of Home Affairs and Head of the National Public Safety Commission from 1994 to 1995, as Chief Cabinet Secretary
Chief Cabinet Secretary
from 1998 to 1999, and as Head of the Okinawa Development Agency in 1999. Nonaka was widely considered as a voice of reason within the LDP.Contents1 Early life and local political career 2 Diet career 3 Post-retirement 4 References 5 External linksEarly life and local political career[edit] Nonaka was born in the town of Sonobe (now part of the city of Nantan) in central Kyoto Prefecture
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Satsuma Clan
The Shimazu clan
Shimazu clan
(島津氏, Shimazu-shi) were the daimyō of the Satsuma han, which spread over Satsuma, Ōsumi and Hyūga provinces in Japan. The Shimazu were identified as one of the tozama or outsider daimyō families[1] in contrast with the fudai or insider clans which were hereditary vassals or allies of the Tokugawa clan.Contents1 History 2 Simplified family tree 3 Order of Succession 4 Other Members 5 Important Retainers 6 Popular culture 7 See also 8 Notes 9 ReferencesHistory[edit]Grave of Shimazu family at Mount Koya.The Shimazu were descendants of the Seiwa Genji
Seiwa Genji
branch of the Minamoto
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Keizō Obuchi
Keizō Obuchi
Keizō Obuchi
(小渕 恵三, Obuchi Keizō, 25 June 1937 – 14 May 2000) was a Japanese politician who served in the House of Representatives for twelve terms and ultimately as the 54th Prime Minister of Japan
Japan
from 30 July 1998 to 5 April 2000. His political career ended when he suffered a serious and ultimately fatal stroke.Contents1 Early life 2 Political career 3 Death 4 Personal life 5 Honours 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Obuchi was born in Nakanojō, Gunma
Nakanojō, Gunma
Prefecture on June 25, 1937.[1] His father, Mitsuhei Obuchi, was one of four representatives in the Diet (parliament) for a district in Gunma, a rural prefecture.[2] At the age of 13, he transferred to a private middle school in Tokyo
Tokyo
and lived in the city for the rest of his life
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Liberal Democratic Party (Japan)
The Liberal Democratic Party of Japan
Japan
(自由民主党, Jiyū-Minshutō), frequently abbreviated to LDP or Jimintō (自民党), is a conservative[11] political party in Japan. The LDP has near continuously been in power since its foundation in 1955, with the exception of a period between 1993 and 1994, and again from 2009 to 2012. In the 2012 election it regained control of government. It holds 291 seats in the lower house and 121 seats in the upper house, with the Komeito
Komeito
the governing coalition has the supermajority in both houses
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Kamo Shrine
Kamo Shrine
Kamo Shrine
(賀茂神社, Kamo-jinja) is a general term for an important Shinto
Shinto
sanctuary complex on both banks of the Kamo River
Kamo River
in northeast Kyoto. It is centered on two shrines.[1] The two shrines, an upper and a lower, lie in a corner of the old capital which was known as the "devil's gate" (鬼門, kimon) due to traditional geomancy beliefs that the north-east corner brought misfortune
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Kyoto
Kyoto
Kyoto
(京都市, Kyōto-shi, pronounced [kʲoːꜜto] ( listen), pronounced [kʲoːtoꜜɕi] ( listen); UK: /kɪˈoʊtoʊ/, US: /kiˈoʊ-/, or /ˈkjoʊ-/[4]) is a city located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. It has a population close to 1.5 million
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Curt Netto
Curt Adolph Netto (August 21, 1847 – February 7, 1909) was a German metallurgist and educator. He is regarded as a precursor for the industrial utilization of aluminium. He was active in early Meiji period Japan.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Publications 3 References 4 Further readingBiography[edit] Netto was born in Freiberg, Saxony, where his father, Gustav Adolph Netto was a mining official. As a youth, he relocated with his family to Schneeberg, Saxony, but returned to Freiberg by 1860. He enrolled in the Freiberg University of Mining and Technology in 1864. He left school in 1869, and volunteered for the military, joining the mountain troops corps. He saw combat in the Franco-Prussian War
Franco-Prussian War
of 1870–1871, and was decorated with the Iron Cross
Iron Cross
(second class). After the war, in 1871, he obtained a job as a chemist working with enamels at the workshop of Ernst August Geitner
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