HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Kick
A kick is a physical strike using the leg, foot, heel, tibia, thigh or knee (the latter is also known as a knee strike). This type of attack is used frequently by hooved animals as well as humans in the context of stand-up fighting. Kicks play a significant role in many forms of martial arts, such as savate, taekwondo, MMA, sikaran, karate, Pankration, Kung fu, Vovinam, kickboxing, Muay Thai, capoeira, silat, and kalaripayattu. Kicking is also prominent from its use in many sports, especially those called football
[...More...]

"Kick" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kalaripayattu
Kalaripayattu
Kalaripayattu
(pronounced as Kalarippayatt) is a martial art, which originated as a style in Kerala, southern India (North Malabar).[1] The word kalari first appears in the Tamil Sangam literature
Sangam literature
(c. 300 BCE to 300 CE)[2] to describe both a battlefield and combat arena. The word kalari tatt denoted a martial feat, while kalari kozhai meant a coward in war.[2] Each warrior in the Sangam era received regular military training
[...More...]

"Kalaripayattu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sports
Sport
Sport
(British English) or sports (American English) includes all forms of competitive physical activity or games which,[1] through casual or organised participation, aim to use, maintain or improve physical ability and skills while providing enjoyment to participants, and in some cases, entertainment for spectators.[2] Usually the contest or game is between two sides, each attempting to exceed the other. Some sports allow a tie game; others provide tie-breaking methods, to ensure one winner and one loser. A number of such two-sided contests may be arranged in a tournament producing a champion. Many sports leagues make an annual champion by arranging games in a regular sports season, followed in some cases by playoffs. Hundreds of sports exist, from those between single contestants, through to those with hundreds of simultaneous participants, either in teams or competing as individuals
[...More...]

"Sports" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rama V
Phra Bat Somdet Phra Poraminthra Maha Chulalongkorn
Chulalongkorn
Phra Chunla Chom Klao Chao Yu Hua (Thai: พระบาทสมเด็จพระปรมินทรมหาจุฬาลงกรณ์ พระจุลจอมเกล้าเจ้าอยู่หัว), or Rama V (20 September 1853 – 23 October 1910), was the fifth monarch of Siam
Siam
under the House of Chakri. He was known to the Siamese of his time as Phra Phuttha Chao Luang (พระพุทธเจ้าหลวง, the Royal Buddha)
[...More...]

"Rama V" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ayutthaya Kingdom
Phitsanulok
Phitsanulok
(1463–1488) Ayutthaya (1488–1666) Lopburi
Lopburi
(1666–1688) Ayutthaya (1688–1767)Languages Ayutthayan ThaiReligion Majority:
[...More...]

"Ayutthaya Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mahabharata
The Mahābhārata (US: /məhɑːˈbɑːrətə/,[1] UK: /ˌmɑːhəˈbɑːrətə/;[2] Sanskrit: महाभारतम्, Mahābhāratam, pronounced [məɦaːˈbʱaːrət̪əm]) is one of the two major Sanskrit
Sanskrit
epics of ancient India, the other being the Rāmāyaṇa.[3] The title may be translated as "the great tale of the Bhārata dynasty". The Mahābhārata is an epic legendary narrative of the Kurukṣetra War and the fates of the Kaurava
Kaurava
and the Pāṇḍava princes. It also contains philosophical and devotional material, such as a discussion of the four "goals of life" or puruṣārtha (12.161). Among the principal works and stories in the Mahābhārata are the Bhagavad Gita, the story of Damayanti, an abbreviated version of the Rāmāyaṇa, and the story of Ṛṣyasringa, often considered as works in their own right. Traditionally, the authorship of the Mahābhārata is attributed to Vyāsa
[...More...]

"Mahabharata" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sanskrit Epics
DivisionsSamhita Brahmana Aranyaka UpanishadsUpanishads Rig vedicAitareya KaushitakiSama vedicChandogya KenaYajur vedicBrihadaranyaka Isha Taittiriya Katha Shvetashvatara MaitriAtharva vedicMundaka Mandukya PrashnaOther scripturesBhagavad Gita AgamasRelated Hindu textsVedangasShiksha Chandas Vyakarana Nirukta Kalpa JyotishaPuranas Brahma puranasBrahma Brahmānda Brahmavaivarta Markandeya BhavishyaVaishnava puranasVishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Vamana Kurma MatsyaShaiva puranasShiva Linga Skanda Vayu AgniItihasaRamayana MahabharataShastras and sutrasDharma Shastra Artha Śastra Kamasutra Brahma Sutras Samkhya Sutras Mimamsa Sutras Nyāya Sūtras Vaiśeṣika Sūtra Yoga Sutras
[...More...]

"Sanskrit Epics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Angkor
Angkor
Angkor
(Khmer: អង្គរ, "Capital City")[1][2] was the capital city of the Khmer Empire, which also recognized as Yasodharapura (Khmer: យសោធរបុរៈ ;Sanskrit: यशोधरपुर) and flourished from approximately the 9th to 15th centuries. Angkor
Angkor
was a megacity supporting at least 0.1% of the global population during 1010–1220. The city houses the magnificent Angkor
Angkor
Wat, one of Cambodia's popular tourist attractions. The word Angkor
Angkor
is derived from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
nagara (नगर), meaning "city".[3] The Angkorian period began in AD 802, when the Khmer Hindu
Hindu
monarch Jayavarman II declared himself a "universal monarch" and "god-king", and lasted until the late 14th century, first falling under Ayutthayan suzerainty in 1351
[...More...]

"Angkor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Banteay Chhmar
Banteay Chhmar
Banteay Chhmar
(Khmer: បន្ទាយឆ្មារ) is a commune (khum) in Thma Puok District
Thma Puok District
in Banteay Meanchey province in northwest Cambodia. It is located 63 km north of Sisophon and about 20 km east of the Thai border
[...More...]

"Banteay Chhmar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hans Talhoffer
Hans Talhoffer
Hans Talhoffer
(Dalhover, Talhouer, Thalhoffer, Talhofer) was a 15th-century German fencing master. His martial lineage is unknown, but his writings make it clear that he had some connection to the tradition of Johannes Liechtenauer, the grand master of a well-known Medieval
Medieval
German school of fencing. Talhoffer was a well-educated man who took interest in astrology, mathematics, onomastics, and the auctoritas and the ratio. He authored at least five fencing manuals during the course of his career, and appears to have made his living teaching, including training people for trial by combat.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] The first known reference to Talhoffer is in 1433, when he represented Johann II von Reisberg, archbishop of Salzburg, before the Vehmic court
[...More...]

"Hans Talhoffer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hoof
A hoof (/ˈhuːf/ or /ˈhʊf/), plural hooves (/ˈhuːvz/ or /ˈhʊvz/) or hoofs /ˈhʊfs/, is the tip of a toe of an ungulate mammal, strengthened by a thick, horny, keratin covering.[1] Artiodactyls are even-toed ungulates, meaning that these species have an even number of digits on each foot. Ruminants, with two main digits, are the largest group. Examples include deer, bison, cattle, goats and sheep.[2] Perissodactyls have an odd number of toes. Examples of perissodactyl mammals are horses, rhinoceroses and tapirs.[3] Hooves are generally cited as limb structures restricted to placental mammals, which unlike other mammal groups undergo prolonged pregnancies
[...More...]

"Hoof" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Knee
The knee joins the thigh with the leg and consists of two joints: one between the femur and tibia (tibiofemoral joint), and one between the femur and patella (patellofemoral joint).[1] It is the largest joint in the human body.[2] The knee is a modified hinge joint, which permits flexion and extension as well as slight internal and external rotation
[...More...]

"Knee" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Thigh
In human anatomy, the thigh is the area between the hip (pelvis) and the knee. Anatomically, it is part of the lower limb.[1] The single bone in the thigh is called the femur. This bone is very thick and strong (due to the high proportion of bone tissue), and forms a ball and socket joint at the hip, and a modified hinge joint at the knee.Contents1 Structure1.1 Bones 1.2 Muscular compartments 1.3 Blood
Blood
supply2 Clinical significance 3 Additional images 4 ReferencesStructure[edit] Bones[edit] Main article: Femur The femur is the only bone in the thigh and serves for an attachment site for all muscles in the thigh. The head of the femur articulates with the acetabulum in the pelvic bone forming the hip joint, while the distal part of the femur articulates with the tibia and kneecap forming the knee. By most measures the femur is the strongest bone in the body
[...More...]

"Thigh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tibia
The tibia /ˈtɪbiə/ (plural tibiae /ˈtɪbii/ or tibias), also known as the shinbone or shankbone, is the larger and stronger of the two bones in the leg below the knee in vertebrates (the other being the fibula), and it connects the knee with the ankle bones. The tibia is found on the medial side of the leg next to the fibula and closer to the median plane or centre-line. The tibia is connected to the fibula by the interosseous membrane of the leg, forming a type of fibrous joint called a syndesmosis with very little movement. The tibia is named for the flute tibia. It is the second largest bone in the human body next to the femur
[...More...]

"Tibia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Heel
The heel is the prominence at the posterior end of the foot. It is based on the projection of one bone, the calcaneus or heel bone, behind the articulation of the bones of the lower leg.Contents1 Anatomical structure 2 Function 3 Cracked heels 4 Other animals 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesAnatomical structure[edit]Sagittal section through the footFrom aboveTo distribute the compressive forces exerted on the heel during gait, and especially the stance phase when the heel contacts the ground, the sole of the foot is covered by a layer of subcutaneous connective tissue up to 2 cm thick (under the heel). This tissue has a system of pressure chambers that both acts as a shock absorber and stabilises the sole. Each of these chambers contains fibrofatty tissue covered by a layer of tough connective tissue made of collagen fibers. These septa ("walls") are firmly attached both to the plantar aponeurosis above and the sole's skin below
[...More...]

"Heel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Foot
The foot (plural feet) is an anatomical structure found in many vertebrates. It is the terminal portion of a limb which bears weight and allows locomotion
[...More...]

"Foot" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.