HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Kachwaha
The Kachwaha
Kachwaha
are a caste group with origins in India. Traditionally they were peasants involved in agriculture but in the 20th century they began to make claims of being a Rajput
Rajput
clan. Some families within the caste did rule a number of kingdoms and princely states, such as Alwar, Amber (later called Jaipur) and Maihar. The Kachwaha
Kachwaha
are sometimes referred to as Kushwaha. This umbrella term is used to represent at least four communities with similar occupational backgrounds, all of whom claim descent from the mythological Suryavansh
Suryavansh
(Solar) dynasty via Kusha, who was one of the twin sons of Rama
Rama
and Sita
[...More...]

"Kachwaha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kurmi
The Kurmi
Kurmi
is a Hindu agricultural caste in India and Nepal.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Eighteenth and nineteenth centuries 2.2 Twentieth century3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingEtymology[edit] There are several theories regarding the etymology of the term Kurmi. It may be derived from an Indian tribal language, or may be a Sanskrit compound term krishi karmi, "agriculturalist."[1] Another theory holds that it was derived from kṛṣmi, meaning "ploughman".[2] History[edit] Eighteenth and nineteenth centuries[edit] With the waning of Mughal rule in the early 18th century, the Indian subcontinent's hinterland dwellers, many of whom were armed and nomadic, began to appear more frequently in settled areas and interact with townspeople and agriculturists.[3] Many new rulers of the 18th century came from such nomadic backgrounds.[3] The effect of this interaction on India's social organization lasted well into the colonial period
[...More...]

"Kurmi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Harem
Harem
Harem
(Arabic: حريم‎ ḥarīm, "a sacred inviolable place; harem; female members of the family"), also known as zenana in South Asia, properly refers to domestic spaces that are reserved for the women of the house in a Muslim
Muslim
family and are inaccessible to adult males except for close relations. Similar institutions have been common in other Mediterranean
Mediterranean
and Middle Eastern civilizations, especially among royal and upper-class families and the term is sometimes used in non-Islamic contexts. The structure of the harem and the extent of monogamy or polygamy has varied depending on the family's personalities, socio-economic status, and local customs. This private space has been traditionally understood as serving the purposes of maintaining the modesty, privilege, and protection of women
[...More...]

"Harem" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hindu Calendar
Hindu
Hindu
calendar is a collective term for the various lunisolar calendars traditionally used in India. They adopt a similar underlying concept for timekeeping, but differ in their relative emphasis to moon cycle or the sun cycle and the names of months and when they consider the New Year to start.[1] Of the various regional calendars, the most studied and known Hindu
Hindu
calendars are the Vikrami calendar (Bikrami) found in northern, western and central regions of the Indian subcontinent, Tamil calendar found in the south, and the Bengali calendar found in the east – all of which emphasize the lunar cycle, their new year starts in spring, with their heritage dating back to 1st millennium BCE
[...More...]

"Hindu Calendar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Brahmans
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


[...More...]
"Brahmans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Akbar
Abu'l-Fath Jalal-ud-din Muhammad
Muhammad
Akbar[7] (15 October 1542[a]– 27 October 1605[10][11]), popularly known as Akbar
Akbar
I (IPA: [əkbər],[12] was the third Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1556 to 1605. Akbar
Akbar
succeeded his father, Humayun, under a regent, Bairam Khan, who helped the young emperor expand and consolidate Mughal domains in India. A strong personality and a successful general, Akbar
Akbar
gradually enlarged the Mughal Empire
Mughal Empire
to include nearly all of the Indian Subcontinent
Indian Subcontinent
north of the Godavari river. His power and influence, however, extended over the entire country because of Mughal military, political, cultural, and economic dominance
[...More...]

"Akbar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mughal Empire
The Mughal Empire
Empire
(Urdu: مغلیہ سلطنت‬‎, translit. Mughliyah Saltanat)[8][2] or Mogul Empire[9] was an empire in the Indian subcontinent, founded in 1526
[...More...]

"Mughal Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bhumihar
Bhumihars are a Hindu
Hindu
caste mainly found in Bihar
Bihar
(including the Mithila region),[2] the Purvanchal
Purvanchal
region of Uttar Pradesh, Jharkhand, the Bundelkhand
Bundelkhand
region of Madhya Pradesh, and Nepal.[3] The Bhumihars claim Brahmin
Brahmin
status, and are also referred to as Bhumihar
Bhumihar
Brahmin.[4] In Bihar, they are also known as Babhan[5] and they have also been called Bhuinhar.[6] The Bhumihars were a prominent land-owning group of eastern India until the 20th century, and controlled nine small princely states and zamindari estates in the region
[...More...]

"Bhumihar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Raja
Raja
Raja
(/ˈrɑːdʒɑː/; also spelled rajah, from Sanskrit राजन् rājan-), is a title for a monarch or princely ruler in South and Southeast Asia
[...More...]

"Raja" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tribute
A tribute (/ˈtrɪbjuːt/)[1] (from Latin
Latin
tributum, contribution) is wealth, often in kind, that a party gives to another as a sign of respect or, as was often the case in historical contexts, of submission or allegiance. Various ancient states exacted tribute from the rulers of land which the state conquered or otherwise threatened to conquer. In case of alliances, lesser parties may pay tribute to more powerful parties as a sign of allegiance and often in order to finance projects that benefited both parties
[...More...]

"Tribute" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hanuman
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


[...More...]
"Hanuman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

North India
North India
India
is a loosely defined region consisting of the northern part of India
[...More...]

"North India" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Gondwana (India)
Gondwana
Gondwana
is a region of India, named after the Gondi people
Gondi people
who live there (though they can also be found in other parts of India). The name of the ancient continent of Gondwanaland was derived from Gondwana, because some of the earliest rock formations of this continent were first investigated in part of the region, in modern Odisha. As Gondi people
Gondi people
are spread widely across central India, and are a minority almost everywhere, there is no unambiguous boundary to the region. However, the core region can be considered to be the eastern part of the Vidarbha
Vidarbha
region of Maharashtra, the parts of Madhya Pradesh immediately to the north of it, and parts of the west of Chhattisgarh
[...More...]

"Gondwana (India)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Shudra
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


[...More...]
"Shudra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Varna (Hinduism)
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


[...More...]
"Varna (Hinduism)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

British Raj
Indian languagesGovernment ColonyMonarch of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Emperor/Empressa •  1858–1901 Victoria •  1901–1910 Edward VII •  1910–1936 George V •  1936 Edward VIII •  1936–1947 George VI Viceroy
[...More...]

"British Raj" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.