HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Joseph Banks
Sir Joseph Banks, 1st Baronet, GCB, PRS (24 February [O.S. 13 February] 1743 – 19 June 1820)[1] was an English naturalist, botanist and patron of the natural sciences. Banks made his name on the 1766 natural history expedition to Newfoundland and Labrador. He took part in Captain James Cook's first great voyage (1768–1771), visiting Brazil, Tahiti, and, after 6 months in New Zealand, Australia, returning to immediate fame. He held the position of President of the Royal Society
President of the Royal Society
for over 41 years
[...More...]

"Joseph Banks" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

British Museum
5,906,716 (2017)[2]Ranked 1st nationallyChairman Sir Richard LambertDirector Hartwig FischerPublic transit access Goodge Street; Holborn; Tottenham Court Road; Russell Square;Website britishmuseum.orgArea 807,000 sq ft (75,000 m2) in 94 GalleriesThe centre of the museum was redeveloped in 2001 to become the Great Court, surrounding the original Reading Room.The British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture
[...More...]

"British Museum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Natural Sciences
Natural science
Natural science
is a branch of science concerned with the description, prediction, and understanding of natural phenomena, based on empirical evidence from observation and experimentation. Mechanisms such as peer review and repeatability of findings are used to try to ensure the validity of scientific advances. Natural science
Natural science
can be divided into two main branches: life science (or biological science) and physical science. Physical science is subdivided into branches, including physics, space science, chemistry, and Earth science
[...More...]

"Natural Sciences" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lemuel Francis Abbott
Lemuel "Francis" Abbott (1760/61 – 5 December 1802) was an English portrait painter, famous for his likeness of Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (currently hanging in the Terracotta Room of number 10 Downing Street) and for those of other naval officers and literary figures of the 18th century.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Work 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit]Portrait of Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson.He was born Lemuel Abbott in Leicestershire in 1760 or 1761, the son of clergyman Lemuel Abbott, curate of Anstey (and later vicar of Thornton) and his wife Mary.[2] In 1775, at the age of 14, he became a pupil of Francis Hayman and lived in London, but returned to his parents after his teacher's death in 1776.[2] There he continued to develop his artistic talents independently, but some authorities have suggested that he may also have studied with Joseph Wright of Derby.[1][3][4] In 1780, Abbott married Anna Maria, and again settled in London, re
[...More...]

"Lemuel Francis Abbott" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Royal Academy
The Royal Academy of Arts
Royal Academy of Arts
(RA) is an art institution based in Burlington House
Burlington House
on Piccadilly
Piccadilly
in London
[...More...]

"Royal Academy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Squire
Starting in the Middle Ages, a squire was the shield- or armour-bearer of a knight.[2] At times, a squire acted as a knight's errand runner.[citation needed] Use of the term evolved over time. Initially, a squire was a knight's apprentice. Later, a village leader or a lord of the manor might be called a squire, and still later, the term applied to key public figures, such as justices of the peace or members of parliament
[...More...]

"Squire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

House Of Commons Of Great Britain
The House of Commons of Great Britain
Great Britain
was the lower house of the Parliament of Great Britain
Parliament of Great Britain
between 1707 and 1801. In 1707, as a result of the Acts of Union of that year, it replaced the House of Commons of England and the third estate of the Parliament of Scotland, as one of the most significant changes brought about by the Union of the kingdoms of England and Scotland
Scotland
into the Kingdom of Great Britain.Pitt addressing the House in 1793In the course of the 18th century, the office of Prime Minister developed. The notion that a government remains in power only as long as it retains the support of Parliament also evolved, leading to the first ever motion of no confidence, when Lord North's government failed to end the American Revolution
[...More...]

"House Of Commons Of Great Britain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baronet
A baronet (/ˈbærənɪt/ or /ˈbærəˌnɛt/;[1] abbreviated Bart or Bt[1]) or the rare female equivalent, a baronetess (/ˈbærənɪtɪs/,[2] /ˈbærənɪtɛs/,[3] or /ˌbærəˈnɛtɛs/;[4] abbreviation Btss), is the holder of a baronetcy, a hereditary title awarded by the British Crown. The practice of awarding baronetcies was originally introduced in England in the 14th century and was used by James I of England
James I of England
in 1611 as a means of raising funds. A baronetcy is the only British hereditary honour that is not a peerage, with the exception of the Anglo-Irish
Anglo-Irish
Black Knight, White Knight
Knight
and Green Knight
Knight
(of which only the Green Knight
Knight
is extant)
[...More...]

"Baronet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Genus
A genus (/ˈdʒiːnəs/, pl. genera /ˈdʒɛnərə/) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms in biology. In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus.E.g. Felis catus
Felis catus
and Felis silvestris
Felis silvestris
are two species within the genus Felis. Felis
Felis
is a genus within the family Felidae.The composition of a genus is determined by a taxonomist. The standards for genus classification are not strictly codified, so different authorities often produce different classifications for genera
[...More...]

"Genus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Acacia
some 980 speciesRange of the genus AcaciaSynonyms Acacia
Acacia
subg. Phyllodineae DC.[1] Esclerona Raf. Acacia
Acacia
facsiculifera shoot, showing phyllodes on the pinnate leaves, formed by dilation of the petiole and proximal part of the rachis[2]Acacia, commonly known as the wattles or acacias, is a large genus of shrubs and trees in the subfamily Mimosoideae
Mimosoideae
of the pea family Fabaceae. Initially it comprised a group of plant species native to Africa and Australia, with the first species A. nilotica described by Linnaeus. Controversy erupted in the early 2000s when it became evident that the genus as it stood was not monophyletic, and that several divergent lineages needed to be placed in separate genera. It turned out that one lineage comprising over 900 species mainly native to Australia
Australia
was not closely related to the mainly African lineage that contained A
[...More...]

"Acacia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Matriculation
Matriculation
Matriculation
is the formal process of entering a university, or of becoming eligible to enter by fulfilling certain academic requirements such as a matriculation examination.Contents1 Australia 2 Bangladesh 3 Brazil 4 Canada 5 Czech Republic 6 Denmark 7 Finland 8 Germany 9 Hong Kong 10 India 11 Malaysia 12 Nepal 13 Pakistan 14 South Africa 15 United Kingdom 16 United States16.1 Special
Special
student17 References 18 External linksAustralia[edit] Matriculation, often shortened to "matric", was the successful completion of 6th Form (Year 12), and was only done by students intending to go on to University
[...More...]

"Matriculation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of Cambridge
The University of Cambridge
Cambridge
(informally Cambridge
Cambridge
University)[note 1] is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and granted a royal charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge
Cambridge
is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.[8] The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
after a dispute with the townspeople.[9] The two medieval universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge"
[...More...]

"University Of Cambridge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Smallpox
Smallpox
Smallpox
was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, Variola major and Variola minor.[7] The last naturally occurring case was diagnosed in October 1977 and the World Health Organization certified the global eradication of the disease in 1980.[10] The risk of death following contracting the disease was about 30%, with higher rates among babies.[6][11] Often those who survive have extensive scarring of their skin and some are left blind.[6] The initial symptoms of the disease include fever and vomiting.[5] This is then followed by formation of sores in the mouth and a skin rash.[5] Ove
[...More...]

"Smallpox" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chelsea, London
Chelsea is an affluent area of South West London,[2] bounded to the south by the River Thames. Its frontage runs from Chelsea Bridge
Chelsea Bridge
along the Chelsea Embankment, Cheyne Walk, Lots Road and Chelsea Harbour. Its eastern boundary was once defined by the River Westbourne, which is now in a pipe above Sloane Square
Sloane Square
Underground station. The modern eastern boundary is Chelsea Bridge
Chelsea Bridge
Road and the lower half of Sloane Street, including Sloane Square
[...More...]

"Chelsea, London" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Newfoundland And Labrador
Newfoundland and Labrador
Labrador
(/ˈnjuːfən(d)lənd, -lænd, njuːˈfaʊndlənd ... ˈlæbrədɔːr/;[6] French: Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador; Montagnais: Akamassiss; Newfoundland Irish: Talamh an Éisc agus Labradar) is the most easterly province of Canada
[...More...]

"Newfoundland And Labrador" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Patron
Patronage is the support, encouragement, privilege, or financial aid that an organization or individual bestows to another. In the history of art, arts patronage refers to the support that kings, popes, and the wealthy have provided to artists such as musicians, painters, and sculptors. It can also refer to the right of bestowing offices or church benefices, the business given to a store by a regular customer, and the guardianship of saints. The word "patron" derives from the Latin: patronus ("patron"), one who gives benefits to his clients (see Patronage in ancient Rome). In some countries the term is used to describe political patronage, which is the use of state resources to reward individuals for their electoral support
[...More...]

"Patron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.