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Isthmus
An isthmus ( /ˈɪsθməs/ or /ˈɪsməs/;[1] plural: isthmuses; from Ancient Greek: ἰσθμός, translit. isthmos, lit. 'neck'[2]) is a narrow piece of land connecting two larger areas across an expanse of water by which they are otherwise separated.[3] A tombolo is an isthmus that consists of a spit or bar, and a strait is the sea counterpart of an isthmus. Canals are often built across isthmuses, where they may be a particularly advantageous shortcut for marine transport
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North Island
The North Island
North Island
or Te Ika-a-Māui (Māori) is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, separated from the slightly larger but much less populous South Island
South Island
by Cook Strait. The island's area is 113,729 square kilometres (43,911 sq mi),[1] making it the world's 14th-largest island. It has a population of 3,677,200 (June 2017).[2] Twelve main urban areas (half of them officially cities) are in the North Island. From north to south, they are Whangarei, Auckland, Hamilton, Tauranga, Rotorua, Gisborne, New Plymouth, Napier, Hastings, Whanganui, Palmerston North, and Wellington, the capital, located at the south-west extremity of the island
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Lake Ontario
Lake Ontario
Ontario
is one of the five Great Lakes
Great Lakes
of North America. It is surrounded on the north, west, and southwest by the Canadian province of Ontario, and on the south and east by the American state of New York, whose water boundaries meet in the middle of the lake. Ontario, Canada's most populous province, was named for the lake. In the Huron language, the name Ontarí'io means "Lake of Shining Waters". Its primary inlet is the Niagara River
Niagara River
from Lake Erie
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Crinan Canal
The Crinan Canal between Crinan and Ardrishaig in Argyll and Bute in the west of Scotland is operated by Scottish Canals. The canal, which opened in 1801, takes its name from the village of Crinan at its western end. Approximately nine miles (14 km) long, the canal connects the village of Ardrishaig on Loch Gilp with the Sound of Jura, providing a navigable route between the Clyde and the Inner Hebrides, without the need for a long diversion around the Kintyre peninsula, and in particular the exposed Mull of Kintyre.[1]Contents1 History 2 Features 3 Popular culture 4 See also 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] The canal was built to provide a short cut for commercial sailing and fishing vessels and later Clyde puffers to travel between the industrialised region around Glasgow to the West Highland villages and islands
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Loch Crinan
Loch Crinan is a seawater loch on the West of Scotland, leading into the Sound of Jura and being the western end of the Crinan Canal. The village of Crinan is at the entrance to the canal at the eastern end of the loch. Duntrune Castle stands on the northern shore. The River Add goes into it by the hamlet of Bellanoch.[1] It contains the islets of An-unalin, Black Rock, Eilean dà Mhèinn, Eilean Glas, and Eilean nan Coinean. References[edit]^ "The Gazetteer for Scotland". This Highland location article is a stub
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Loch Gilp
Loch Gilp (Scottish Gaelic: "Loch Gilb") is a small inlet on Loch Fyne which gives its name to Lochgilphead. The Crinan Canal extends from the loch across to Crinan itself.Loch Gilp - taken from Poltalloch Street in LochgilpheadCoordinates: 56°00′N 5°25′W / 56.000°N 5.417°W / 56.000; -5.417This Argyll and Bute location article is a stub
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Canal
Canals, or navigations, are human-made channels, or artificial waterways, for water conveyance, or to service water transport vehicles. In most cases, the engineered works will have a series of dams and locks that create reservoirs of low speed current flow. These reservoirs are referred to as slack water levels, often just called levels. A canal is also known as a navigation when it parallels a river and shares part of its waters and drainage basin, and leverages its resources by building dams and locks to increase and lengthen its stretches of slack water levels while staying in its valley. In contrast, a canal cuts across a drainage divide atop a ridge, generally requiring an external water source above the highest elevation. Many canals have been built at elevations towering over valleys and other water ways crossing far below. Canals with sources of water at a higher level can deliver water to a destination such as a city where water is needed
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Welland Canal
The Welland
Welland
Canal is a ship canal in Ontario, Canada, connecting Lake Ontario
Ontario
and Lake Erie. It forms a key section of the St. Lawrence Seaway. Traversing the Niagara Peninsula
Niagara Peninsula
from Port Weller to Port Colborne, it enables ships to ascend and descend the Niagara Escarpment and bypass Niagara Falls. The canal carries about 3,000 ships which carry about 40,000,000 tons of cargo a year
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LSJ
A Greek–English Lexicon, often referred to as Liddell & Scott (/ˈlɪdəl/),[1] Liddell–Scott–Jones, or LSJ, is a standard lexicographical work of the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
language.Contents1 Liddell and Scott's lexicon 2 Condensed editions 3 The Supplement 4 Electronic editions 5 Translations 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLiddell and Scott's lexicon[edit] The lexicon was begun in the nineteenth century and is now in its ninth (revised) edition
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Lake Erie
Lake
Lake
Erie[5] (/ˈɪəri/) is the fourth-largest lake (by surface area) of the five Great Lakes
Great Lakes
in North America, and the eleventh-largest globally if measured in terms of surface area.[1][6] It is the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume of the Great Lakes[7][8] and therefore also has the shortest average water residence time. At its deepest point Lake
Lake
Erie is 210 feet (64 metres) deep. Situated on the International Boundary between Canada
Canada
and the United States, Lake
Lake
Erie's northern shore is the Canadian province of Ontario, with the U.S. states of Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York on its western, southern and eastern shores. These jurisdictions divide the surface area of the lake with water boundaries. The lake was named by the Erie people, a Native American people who lived along its southern shore
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Red Sea
The Red Sea
Red Sea
(also the Erythraean Sea) is a seawater inlet of the Indian Ocean, lying between Africa
Africa
and Asia. The connection to the ocean is in the south through the Bab el Mandeb
Bab el Mandeb
strait and the Gulf of Aden. To the north lie the Sinai Peninsula, the Gulf of Aqaba, and the Gulf of Suez
Gulf of Suez
(leading to the Suez
Suez
Canal). The Red Sea
Red Sea
is a Global 200 ecoregion. The sea is underlain by the Red Sea Rift which is part of the Great Rift Valley. The Red Sea
Red Sea
has a surface area of roughly 438,000 km2 (169,100 mi2),[1][2] is about 2250 km (1398 mi) long and, at its widest point, 355 km (220.6 mi) wide
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Literal Translation
Literal translation, direct translation, or word-for-word translation is the rendering of text from one language to another one word at a time (Latin: "verbum pro verbo") with or without conveying the sense of the original whole. In translation studies, "literal translation" denotes technical translation of scientific, technical, technological or legal texts.[1] In translation theory, another term for "literal translation" is "metaphrase"; and for phrasal ("sense") translation — "paraphrase." When considered a bad practice of conveying word by word (lexeme to lexeme, or morpheme to lexeme) translation of non-technical type literal translations has the meaning of mistranslating idioms,[2] for example, or in the context of translating an analytic language to a synthetic language, it renders even the grammar unintelligible. The concept of literal translation may be viewed as an oxymoron (contradiction in terms), given that literal denotes something existing without interpretation, where
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Romanization Of Ancient Greek
Romanization
Romanization
of Greek is the transliteration (letter-mapping) or transcription (sound-mapping) of text from the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet
into the Latin
Latin
alphabet. The conventions for writing and romanizing Ancient Greek and Modern Greek
Modern Greek
differ markedly, which can create confusion. The sound of the English letter B (/b/) was written as β in ancient Greek but is now written as the digraph μπ, while the modern β sounds like the English letter V (/v/) instead. The Greek name Ἰωάννης became Johannes
Johannes
in Latin
Latin
and then John in English, but in Greek itself has instead become Γιάννης; this might be written as Yannis, Jani, Ioannis, Yiannis, or Giannis, but not Giannes or Giannēs as it would have been in ancient Greek
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Ancient Greek Language
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of AustraliaFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Advance Australia
Australia
Fair"[N 1]Capital Canberra 35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest city SydneyNational language English[N 2]DemonymAustralian Aussie
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Tasmania
Tasmania
Tasmania
(/tæzˈmeɪniə/;[11] abbreviated as Tas and known colloquially as Tassie) is an island state of Australia. It is located 240 km (150 mi) to the south of the Australian mainland, separated by the Bass Strait
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