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Imagination
Imagination, also called the faculty of imagining, is the creative ability to form images, ideas, and sensations in the mind without any immediate input of the senses (such as seeing or hearing). Imagination helps make knowledge applicable in solving problems and is fundamental to integrating experience and the learning process.[1][2][3][4] A basic training for imagination is listening to storytelling (narrative),[1][5] in which the exactness of the chosen words is the fundamental factor to "evoke worlds".[6] Imagination
Imagination
is a cognitive process used in mental functioning and sometimes used in conjunction with psychological imagery. The cognate term of mental imagery may be used in psychology for denoting the process of reviving in the mind recollections of objects formerly given in sense perception
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Dorsolateral Prefrontal
The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC or DL-PFC) is an area in the prefrontal cortex of the brain of humans and non-human primates. It is one of the most recently evolved parts of the human brain. It undergoes a prolonged period of maturation which lasts until adulthood.[1] The DLPFC is not an anatomical structure, but rather a functional one. It lies in the middle frontal gyrus of humans (i.e., lateral part of Brodmann's area (BA) 9 and 46[2]). In macaque monkeys, it is around the principal sulcus (i.e., in Brodmann's area 46[3][4][5])
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Role Playing
Role-playing
Role-playing
is the changing of one's behaviour to assume a role, either unconsciously to fill a social role, or consciously to act out an adopted role
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Albert Einstein
Albert Einstein
Albert Einstein
(/ˈaɪnstaɪn/ EYEN-styne;[4] German: [ˈalbɛɐ̯t ˈʔaɪnʃtaɪn] (listen); 14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist[5] who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics).[3][6]:274 His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science.[7][8] He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E
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Ruth M.J. Byrne
The most common meaning of Byrne
Byrne
(variations: Burns, Byrnes, O'Byrne) is a surname derived from the Irish name Ó Broin. There are two Irish surnames which have Byrne
Byrne
as their English spelling; the most common comes from Ó Broin, which refers to the Leinster-based family of Bran as described below, the less common family name is Ó Beirn or Ó Beirne in Irish comes from a different Sept or family and therefore has different origins. The latter is most commonly found in Mayo, Sligo and Donegal in the Northwest of Ireland.Contents1 History 2 List of people surnamed Byrne
Byrne
or O'Byrne 3 Other uses 4 Further reading 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] In the Irish language, Ó Broin means "descendant of Bran". The name has been traced back to the ancient Celtic chieftain, Bran mac Máelmórda, King of Leinster, deposed in 1018, (d
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Cultural Psychology
Cultural psychology
Cultural psychology
is the study of how cultures reflect and shape the psychological processes of their members.[1] The main tenet of cultural psychology is that mind and culture are inseparable and mutually constitutive, meaning that people are shaped by their culture and their culture is also shaped by them.[2] As Richard Shweder, one of the major proponents of the field, writes, " Cultural psycholo
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French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
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Verisimilitude
Verisimilitude (or truthlikeness) is a philosophical concept that distinguishes between the relative and apparent (or seemingly so) truth and falsity of assertions and hypotheses.[1] The problem of verisimilitude is the problem of articulating what it takes for one false theory to be closer to the truth than another false theory.[2][3] This problem was central to the philosophy of Karl Popper, largely because Popper was among the first to affirm that truth is the aim of scientific inquiry while acknowledging that most of the greatest scientific theories in the history of science are, strictly speaking, false.[4] If this long string of purportedly false theories is to constitute progress with respect to the goal of truth, then it must be at least possible for one false theory to be closer to the truth than o
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Olin Levi Warner
Olin Levi Warner
Olin Levi Warner
(April 9, 1844 – August 14, 1896) was an American sculptor and artist noted for the striking bas relief portrait medallions and busts he created in the late 19th century.[1] Life[edit] Warner was born in Suffield, Connecticut. Warner's great-great-uncle was the Revolutionary leader Seth Warner. As a young man he worked as an artisan and a telegraph operator. In 1869 he had saved up enough money to move to Paris, where he studied sculpture at the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts under François Jouffroy, and worked as an assistant to Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux.[2] When the French Third Republic
French Third Republic
was proclaimed in 1870, he enlisted in the Foreign Legion, resuming his studies when the siege was over (May 1871). [3] In 1872, he removed to New York City
New York City
and established a studio
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The Canterbury Tales
The Canterbury
Canterbury
Tales (Middle English: Tales of Caunterbury[2]) is a collection of 24 stories that runs to over 17,000 lines written in Middle English
Middle English
by Geoffrey Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
between 1387 and 1400.[3] In 1386, Chaucer became Controller of Customs and Justice of Peace and, in 1389, Clerk of the King's work.[4] It was during these years that Chaucer began working on his most famous text, The Canterbury
Canterbury
Tales. The tales (mostly written in verse, although some are in prose) are presented as part of a story-telling contest by a group of pilgrims as they travel together on a journey from London to Canterbury
Canterbury
to visit the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket
Thomas Becket
at Canterbury
Canterbury
Cathedral
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The Man Of Law's Prologue And Tale
The Man of Law's Tale
The Man of Law's Tale
is the fifth of the Canterbury Tales
Canterbury Tales
by Geoffrey Chaucer, written around 1387. John Gower's "Tale of Constance" in Confessio Amantis
Confessio Amantis
tells the same story and may have been a source for Chaucer.[1] Nicholas Trivet's Les chronicles was a source for both authors.[2]Contents1 Summary 2 Sources 3 Analysis3.1 Saints' lives genre 3.2 Rhetoric 3.3 John Gower 3.4 Sequence with other tales4 See also 5 References 6 External linksSummary[edit] Constance (Custance in Chaucer) is the daughter of the emperor in Rome. Syrian merchants report her great beauty to the Sultan. A marriage contract is negotiated by her father which requires the Sultan and his subjects to convert to Christianity. The Sultan's mother, enraged that her son would turn his back on Islam, kills her son at the wedding party and has Constance set adrift on the sea
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Geoffrey Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
(/ˈtʃɔːsər/; c. 1343 – 25 October 1400), known as the Father of English literature,[1] is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages. He was the first poet to be buried in Poets' Corner
Poets' Corner
of Westminster Abbey. While he achieved fame during his lifetime as an author, philosopher, and astronomer, composing a scientific treatise on the astrolabe for his ten-year-old son Lewis, Chaucer also maintained an active career in the civil service as a bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat. Among his many works are The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, The Legend of Good Women and Troilus
Troilus
and Criseyde
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Charybdis
Charybdis
Charybdis
(/kəˈrɪbdɪs/; Ancient Greek: Χάρυβδις, pronounced [kʰárybdis], Kharybdis) was a sea monster, later rationalized as a whirlpool and considered a shipping hazard in the Strait of Messina.Contents1 Description 2 Genealogy 3 Mythology3.1 Origin 3.2 The Odyssey 3.3 Jason and the Argonauts 3.4 Aesop4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit]The Strait of Messina, with Scylla
Scylla
(underlined in red) and Charybdis on the opposite shoresThe sea monster Charybdis
Charybdis
was believed to live under a small rock on one side of a narrow channel. Opposite her was Scylla, another sea monster, that lived inside a much larger rock. [Odyssey, Book XII] The sides of the strait were within an arrow-shot of each other, and sailors attempting to avoid one of them would come in reach of the other
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Gulf Of Gabès
A gulf is a large bay that is an arm of an ocean or a sea.Contents1 Places 2 Arts and media 3 Businesses and organizations 4 Other 5 See alsoPlaces[edit] See also: List of gulfs Gulf
Gulf
of Mexico, large body of water adjacent to the United States and Mexico Gulf
Gulf
Coast of the United StatesPersian Gulf, body of water between Iran (also known as Persia) and the Arabian Peninsula" Gulf
Gulf
countries" or "The Gulf", terms for Arab states of the Persian GulfIn Australia: Gulf
Gulf
of Carpentaria, northern Australia Gulf
Gulf
Country, the region surrounding the Gulf
Gulf
of CarpentariaIn Canada: Gulf
Gulf
of Saint Lawrence, outlet of the St
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Simile
A simile (/ˈsɪməli/) is a figure of speech that directly compares two things.[1][2] Although similes and metaphors are similar, similes explicitly use connecting words (such as like, as, so, than, or various verbs such as resemble),[1] though these specific words are not always necessary.[3] While similes are mainly used in forms of poetry that compare the inanimate and the living, there are also terms in which similes and personifications are used for humorous purposes and comparison.Contents1 Uses1.1 In literature 1.2 In comedy2 In languages other than English2.1 Arabic 2.2 Vietnamese3 See also 4 ReferencesUses[edit] In literature[edit]"O My Luve's like a red, red rose." "A Red, Red Rose," by Robert Burns.[1][4] John Milton, Paradise Lost, a Homeric simile:[5]As when a prowling Wolf, Whom hunger drives to seek new haunt for prey, Watching where Shepherds pen thir Flocks at eve In hurdl'd Cotes amid the field secure, Le
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Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero[n 1] (/ˈsɪsəroʊ/; Classical Latin: [ˈmaːr.kʊs ˈtʊl.lɪ.ʊs ˈkɪ.kɛ.roː]; 3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman politician and lawyer, who served as consul in the year 63 BC. He came from a wealthy municipal family of the Roman equestrian order, and is considered one of Rome's greatest orators and prose stylists.[2][3] His influence on the Latin
Latin
language was so immense that the subsequent history of prose, not only in
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