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Ijo Languages
The Ijaw languages (/ˈɔː/),[2] also spelt Ịjọ,[3] are the languages spoken by the Ijo people in southern Nigeria. The Ijo languages are traditionally considered a distinct branch of the Niger–Congo family (perhaps along with Defaka in a group called Ijoid).[4] They are notable for their subject–object–verb basic word order, which is otherwise an unusual feature in Niger–Congo, shared only by such distant potential branches as Mande and Dogon. Like Mande and Dogon, Ijoid lacks even traces of the noun class system considered characteristic of Niger–Congo. This motivated Joseph Greenberg, in his initial classification of Niger–Congo, to describe them as having split early from that family
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Ijo People
Ijaw people (also known by the subgroups "Ijo" or "Izon") are people in Niger Delta in Nigeria, inhabiting regions of the states of Ondo, Bayelsa (their original Homeland), Delta, Edo, Akwa Ibom and Rivers state.[2] Many are found as migrant fishermen in camps as far west as Sierra Leone and as far east as Gabon. Population figures for the Ijaws vary greatly,[3] though most range from 13 million to 15 million.[4][5][1][3] They have long lived in locations near many sea trade routes, and they were well connected to other areas by trade as early as the 15th century.[6] The Ijaw speak nine closely related Niger–Congo languages, all of which belong to the Ijoid branch of the Niger–Congo tree
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Languages Of Nigeria
There are over 525 native languages spoken in Nigeria.[1][2] The official language of Nigeria is English, the former language of colonial British Nigeria. As reported in 2003, Nigerian English and Nigerian Pidgin were spoken as a second language by 60 million people in Nigeria.[3] Communication in the English language is much more popular in the country's urban communities than it is in the rural areas, due to globalization.[4] The major native languages, in terms of population, are Hausa (over 63 million when including L2 speakers), Yoruba (over 42 million including L2 speakers), Igbo (over 35 million, including L2 speakers) Fulfulde (15 million), Efik-Ibibio cluster (10 million), Kanuri (8 million), Tiv (4 million), and approx
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Berbice Creole Dutch
Berbice Dutch Creole is a now extinct Dutch creole language. It had a lexicon partly based on a West African language, perhaps the ancestor of the modern Kalabari language.[3] In contrast to the widely known Negerhollands Dutch creole spoken in the Virgin Islands, Berbice Creole Dutch and its relative Skepi Creole Dutch, were more or less unknown to the outside world until Ian Robertson first reported on the two languages in 1975. Dutch linguist Silvia Kouwenberg subsequently investigated the creole language, publishing its grammar in 1994.[3] Berbice was settled in 1627 by the Dutchman Abraham van Peere. A few years later, Suriname was settled by Englishmen Lord Willoughby and Lawrence Hyde under a grant from the English King, Charles II. In the beginning, therefore, Suriname was a British and Berbice a Dutch possession. On 22 April 1796, the British occupied the territory
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Hausa Language
Hausa (/ˈhsə/;[5] Harshen/Halshen Hausa) is a Chadic language spoken by the Hausa people, the largest native ethnic group in Africa, mainly within the territories of Niger and the northern half of Nigeria, and with significant minorities in Ghana, Sudan, and Cameroon.[6][7] Hausa is a member of the Afroasiatic language family and is the most widely spoken language within the Chadic branch of that family
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