HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Ijaw People
Ijaw people (also known by the subgroups "Ijo" or "Izon") are people in Niger Delta in Nigeria, inhabiting regions of the states of Ondo, Bayelsa (their original Homeland), Delta, Edo, Akwa Ibom and Rivers state.[2] Many are found as migrant fishermen in camps as far west as Sierra Leone and as far east as Gabon. Population figures for the Ijaws vary greatly,[3] though most range from 13 million to 15 million.[4][5][1][3] They have long lived in locations near many sea trade routes, and they were well connected to other areas by trade as early as the 15th century.[6] The Ijaw speak nine closely related Niger–Congo languages, all of which belong to the Ijoid branch of the Niger–Congo tree
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Arogbo Clan
The Arogbo Izon People "are a Clan or Sub-ethnic group of the larger Izon Nation, the 3rd Largest Ethnic Nationatity in Nigeria. Izon Nation is surely the largest Ethnic Group in the Niger Delta Natural Region. They are very valiant and courageous folks. They have domiciled in the Southeastern part of present day Ondo State from about the 9th Century A.D. The Arogbo Izon Ibe covers over One Hundred And Twenty (120) Izon Towns and Villages with headquarters at AROGBO TOWN. Historically, the Arogbo Izon, a very warlike people, have had trading contacts with neighboring Ijaw groups (Apoi, Egbema) and the Ijebu and Ilaje Yoruba. Most Arogbo are bilingual, speaking dialects of both the Yoruba and Ijaw languages. The Arogbo Izon acted as middle men in the slave trade, selling captives from the interior to Europeans. The Freedom Post was erected at Arogbo Town in 1885. The Arogbo Izon hosted Nana Olomu in protection against colonialists who declared the Itsekiri Chief wanted
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Buseni Clan
The Buseni tribe (Biseni) lives in central Bayelsa State, Nigeria. It is a small tribe bordered by the Gbaran to the north and by the Zarama and Okordia clans to the northeast.[1]

Ijaw Languages
The Ijaw languages (
/ˈɔː/),[2] also spelt Ịjọ,[3] are the languages spoken by the Ijo people in southern Nigeria. The Ijo languages are traditionally considered a distinct branch of the Niger–Congo family (perhaps along with Defaka in a group called Ijoid).[4] They are notable for their subject–object–verb basic word order, which is otherwise an unusual feature in Niger–Congo, shared only by such distant potential branches as Mande and Dogon. Like Mande and Dogon, Ijoid lacks even traces of the noun class system considered characteristic of Niger–Congo. This motivated Joseph Greenberg, in his initial classification of Niger–Congo, to describe them as having split early from that family
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Ijo Languages
The Ijaw languages (
/ˈɔː/),[2] also spelt Ịjọ,[3] are the languages spoken by the Ijo people in southern Nigeria. The Ijo languages are traditionally considered a distinct branch of the Niger–Congo family (perhaps along with Defaka in a group called Ijoid).[4] They are notable for their subject–object–verb basic word order, which is otherwise an unusual feature in Niger–Congo, shared only by such distant potential branches as Mande and Dogon. Like Mande and Dogon, Ijoid lacks even traces of the noun class system considered characteristic of Niger–Congo. This motivated Joseph Greenberg, in his initial classification of Niger–Congo, to describe them as having split early from that family
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Ijoid Languages
Ijoid is a proposed but undemonstrated group of languages linking the
Ijaw languages (Ịjọ) with the endangered Defaka language. The similarities, however, may be due to Ijaw influence on Defaka.[2] The Ijoid, or perhaps just Ijaw, languages form a divergent branch of the Niger–Congo family and are noted for their subject–object–verb basic word order, which is otherwise an unusual feature in Niger–Congo, shared only by such distant branches as Mande and Dogon. Like Mande and Dogon, Ijoid lacks even traces of the noun class system considered characteristic of Niger–Congo, and so might have split early from that family
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Gabon
Coordinates: 1°S 12°E / 1°S 12°E / -1; 12 Gabonese music is lesser-known in comparison with regional giants like the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Cameroon. The Gabon also features internationally celebrated masks, such as the n'goltang (Fang) and the reliquary figures of the Kota. Each group has its own set of masks used for various reasons. They are mostly used in traditional ceremonies such as marriage, birth and funerals
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Akwa Ibom
Akwa Ibom is a state in Nigeria. It is located in the coastal southern part of the country, lying between latitudes 4°32′N and 5°33′N, and longitudes 7°25′E and 8°25′E. The state is located in the South-South geopolitical zone, and is bordered on the east by Cross River State, on the west by Rivers State and Abia State, and on the south by the Atlantic Ocean and the southernmost tip of Cross River State. Akwa Ibom is one of Nigeria's 36 states, with a population of over five million people. The state was created in 1987 by Ibrahim Babangida from the former Cross River State and is currently the highest oil- and gas-producing state in the country. The state's capital is Uyo, with over 500,000 inhabitants. Akwa Ibom has an airport and two major seaports on the Atlantic Ocean with a proposed construction of a seaport at Ibaka, Oron. The state also has a 30,000-seat sports complex
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]