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Cristóbal Rojas (artist)
Cristóbal Rojas (December 15, 1857 – November 8, 1890) was one of the most important and high-profile Venezuelan painters of the 19th century. Rojas's styles varied considerably throughout his life, and he displayed talents in painting that ranged primarily for dramatic effect, to works done in the impressionist style. Cristóbal Rojas Poleo was born in the city of Cúa in the Valles del Tuy to parents who worked in the medical profession.[1] Part of his childhood occurred during the middle of the federal war (1859–1863) and Cúa was particularly affected by the events of the war. He initiated studies under his grandfather, José Luis Rojas, who taught him how to draw and motivated him to improve. At 13 years old, his father died and he was forced to begin work in a tobacco factory in Cúa to help support his family.[1] In 1878, an earthquake devastated the Valles del Tuy region, and the Rojas faced poverty
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Roundworm

The nematodes (UK: /ˈnɛmətdz/ NEM-ə-tohdz, US: /ˈnm-/ NEEM- Greek: Νηματώδη; Latin: Nematoda) or roundworms constitute the phylum Nematoda (also called Nemathelminthes),[2][3] with plant-parasitic nematodes being known as eelworms.[citation needed] They are a diverse animal phylum inhabiting a broad range of environments. Taxonomically, they are classified along with insects and other moulting animals in the clade Ecdysozoa, and unlike flatworms, have tubular digestive systems with openings at both ends
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Shennong Bencaojing
Shennong Bencaojing (also The Classic of Herbal Medicine and Shen-nung Pen-tsao Ching; simplified Chinese: 神农本草经; traditional Chinese: 神農本草經; pinyin: Shénnóng Běncǎo Jīng; Wade–Giles: Shen2-nung2 Pen3-ts'ao3 Ching1) is a Chinese book on agriculture and medicinal plants, traditionally attributed to Shennong. Researchers believe the text is a compilation of oral traditions, written between about 200 and 250 CE. [1][2] The original text no longer exists but is said to have been composed of three volumes containing 365 entries on medicaments and their description. The first volume of the treatise included 120 drugs harmless to humans, the "stimulating properties": lingzhi, ginseng, jujube, the orange, Chinese cinnamon, Eucommia bark, cannabis, or the root of liquorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis)
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Ge Hong
Ge Hong (葛洪; b. 283 [1][2] - d. 343 [1] or 364 [2]) was an Eastern Jin Dynasty scholar, and the author of Essays on Chinese Characters. He is the originator of First Aid in TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) and influenced later generations. Ge Hong was born as the third son into a well-established family, his father died when he was 13. He was often asked to appraise his friends and acquittance as possible candidates for government office positions and was also chosen to perform military service. However he was unhappy with his life as an official. Although he never rejected the Confucianism, he grew interested in Daoist philosophy and using drugs so he could achieve the spiritual freedoms of an immortal
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Song Dynasty
The Song dynasty ([sʊ̂ŋ]; Chinese: 宋朝; pinyin: Sòng cháo; 960–1279) was an imperial dynasty of China that began in 960 and lasted until 1279. The dynasty was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of the Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporaneous Liao, Western Xia and Jin dynasties to its north. It was eventually conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy
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Daozang
Daozang (Chinese: 道藏; pinyin: Dàozàng; Wade-Giles: Tao Tsang), meaning "Taoist Canon", consists of around 1,400 texts that were collected c. 400 (after the Dao De Jing and Zhuang Zi which are the core Taoist texts). They were collected by Taoist monks of the period in an attempt to bring together all of the teachings of Taoism, including all the commentaries and expositions of the various masters from the original teachings found in the Tao Te Ching and Zhuangzi. It was split into Three Grottoes, which mirrors the Buddhist Tripitaka (three baskets) division
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Zhengyi Dao
Zhengyi Dao (Chinese: 正一道; pinyin: Zheng Yi Dào) or the Way of Orthodox Unity is a Chinese Daoist movement that emerged during the Tang dynasty as a transformation of the earlier Tianshi Dao movement. Like Tianshi Dao, the leader of Zhengyi Daoism was known as the Celestial Master. By the beginning of the Tang dynasty in 618, the term 'Celestial Master' had lost the potency it had in earlier movements such as the Five Pecks of Rice, and any prominent Daoist could be accorded the title.[1] Emperor Xuanzong (712-756) canonized the first Celestial Master Zhang Daoling during his reign. This did not benefit the original territory of his followers in Sichuan, but rather benefited a temple in the Jiangnan area of Jiangxi province. This temple, located at Mount Longhu, claimed to be the spot where Zhang Daoling had obtained the Tao, and where his descendants still lived
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Gu (poison)
Gu (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade–Giles: ku3) or jincan (traditional Chinese: 金蠶; simplified Chinese: 金蚕; pinyin: jīncán; Wade–Giles: chin1-ts'an2; lit. "gold silkworm") was a venom-based poison associated with cultures of south China, particularly Nanyue. The traditional preparation of gu poison involved sealing several venomous creatures (e.g., centipede, snake, scorpion) inside a closed container, where they devoured one another and allegedly concentrated their toxins into a single survivor, whose body would be fed upon by larvae until consumed. The last surviving larva held the complex poison. Gu was used in black magic practices such as manipulating sexual partners, creating malignant diseases, and causing death
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Nematode

The nematodes (UK: /ˈnɛmətdz/ NEM-ə-tohdz, US: /ˈnm-/ NEEM- Greek: Νηματώδη; Latin: Nematoda) or roundworms constitute the phylum Nematoda (also called Nemathelminthes),[2][3] with plant-parasitic nematodes being known as eelworms.[citation needed] They are a diverse animal phylum inhabiting a broad range of environments. Taxonomically, they are classified along with insects and other moulting animals in the clade Ecdysozoa, and unlike flatworms, have tubular digestive systems with openings at both ends
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Huangdi Neijing
Huangdi Neijing (simplified Chinese: 黄帝内经; traditional Chinese: 黃帝內經; pinyin: Huángdì Nèijīng), literally the Inner Canon of the Yellow Emperor or Esoteric Scripture of the Yellow Emperor, is an ancient Chinese medical text that has been treated as the fundamental doctrinal source for Chinese medicine for more than two millennia. The work is composed of two texts—each of eighty-one chapters or treatises in a question-and-answer format between the mythical Yellow Emperor and six of his equally legendary ministers. The first text, the Suwen (素問), also known as Basic Questions,[1] covers the theoretical foundation of Chinese Medicine and its diagnostic methods. The second and generally less referred-to text, the Lingshu (靈樞; Spiritual Pivot), discusses acupuncture therapy in great detail
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Fulu
Fulu (simplified Chinese: 符箓; traditional Chinese: 符籙), is a term for supernatural Taoist incantations and magic symbols as a Chinese incantation[1][2][3] or (written or painted) charm or a Chinese talisman as a Lingfu (simplified Chinese: 灵符; traditional Chinese: 靈符)[4] [5][6] by Taoist practitioners in the past, These practitioners are also called Fulu Pai (Chinese: 符籙派) or the Fulu Sect made up of daoshi from different schools or offshoots of Taojia
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Herodotus

Herodotus (/hɪˈrɒdətəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἡρόδοτος, Hēródotos, Attic Greek pronunciation: [hɛː.ró.do.tos]; c. 484 – c. 425 BC) was an ancient Greek historian who was born in Halicarnassus in the Persian Empire (modern-day Bodrum, Turkey). He is known for having written the book The Histories (Greek: Ἱστορίαι Historíai), a detailed record of his "inquiry" (ἱστορία historía) on the origins of the Greco-Persian Wars. He is widely considered to have been the first writer to have treated historical subjects using a method of systematic investigation—specifically, by collecting his materials and then critically arranging them into an historiographic narrative
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