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Barotseland

Barotseland (Lozi: Mubuso Bulozi) is a Kingdom between Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Angola. It is the homeland of the Lozi people or Barotse,[1] or Malozi, who are a unified group of over 20 individual formerly diverse tribes related through kinship, whose original branch are the Luyi (Maluyi), and also assimilated Southern Sotho tribe of South Africa known as the Makololo.[2][3] The Barotse speak Silozi, a language most closely related to Sesotho
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Boer

Boer (/bʊər/) is Dutch and Afrikaans for "farmer".[2] In South African contexts, "Boers" (Afrikaans: Boere) refers to the descendants of the proto-Afrikaans-speaking settlers of the eastern Cape frontier[3] in Southern Africa during the 18th and much of the 19th century. From 1652 to 1795, the Dutch East India Company controlled this area, but the United Kingdom incorporated it into the British Empire in 1806.[4] In addition, the term "Boeren" also applied to those who left the Cape Colony during the 19th century to settle in the Orange Free State, Transvaal (together known as the Boer Republics), and to a lesser extent Natal. They emigrated from the Cape primarily to escape British rule and to get away from the constant border wars between the British imperial government and the indigenous peoples on the eastern frontier.[4][
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Cape Colony

The Cape of Good Hope, also known as the Cape Colony (Dutch: Kaapkolonie), was a British colony in present-day South Africa, named after the Cape of Good Hope. The British colony was preceded by an earlier Corporate colony, that became a Dutch colony of the same name (controlled by France), the Kaap de Goede Hoop, established in 1652 by the United East India Company (VOC). The Cape was under VOC rule from 1652 to 1795 and under rule of the Batavia Republic from 1803 to 1806.[5] The VOC lost the colony to Great Britain following the 1795 Battle of Muizenberg, but it was acceded to the Batavia Republic following the 1802 Peace of Amiens. It was re-occupied by the UK following the Battle of Blaauwberg in 1806, and British possession affirmed with the Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1814.

Map of the Cape of Good Hope in 1885 (blue)
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Mzilikazi
Mzilikazi Khumalo (c. 1790 – 9 September 1868) was a Southern African king who founded the Mthwakazi Kingdom now known as Matebeleland, in what became British South Africa Company-ruled Rhodesia and is now Zimbabwe. His name means "the great road".[1] He was born the son of Mashobane kaMangethe near Mkuze, Zululand (now known as KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa), and died at Ingama, Matebeleland (near Bulawayo, Zimbabwe). Many consider him to be the greatest Southern African military leader after the Zulu king Shaka. In his autobiography, David Livingstone referred to Mzilikazi as the second most impressive leader he encountered on the African continent. Mzilikazi was originally a lieutenant of Shaka but had a quarrel with him in 1823 and rebelled. Rather than face ritual execution, he fled northwards with his followers
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Makololo
The Kololo or Makololo are a subgroup of the Sotho-Tswana people native to Southern Africa. In the early 19th century, they were displaced by the Zulu, migrating north to Barotseland, Zambia. They conquered the territory of the Luyana people and imposed their own language. The combination of Luyana and Kololo languages gave rise to the current Lozi language spoken by the Lozi people, descendants of the Luyana and nearby tribes. In 1864, the Kololo kingdom was overthrown and some chiefs moved to Chikwawa District, Malawi, with David Livingstone. The Kololo are also known as Makololo. When referring to Kololo people in plural, their endonym is Bakololo, which includes the Bantu clitic ba-. The Kololo appear to be named after Kololo, the wife of their first chief, Sebitwane. Another theory is that it is a Luyana word meaning "bald" referring to their conqueror's hairstyles.[
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Zambia
Coordinates: 15°S 30°E / 15°S 30°E / -15; 30 Zambia is a Christian nation according to the 1996 constitution,[89] but a wide variety of religious traditions exist. Traditional religious thoughts blend easily with Christian beliefs in many of the country's syncretic churches. About three-fourths of the population is Protestant while about 20% follow Roman Catholicism
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South African Republic

The South African Republic (Dutch: Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek; the ZAR; also known as the Transvaal Republic, Afrikaans: Suid-Afrikaanse Republiek) was an independent and internationally recognised state located in what is now South Africa, from 1852 to 1902. The Republic defeated the British Empire in what is often referred to as the First Boer War and remained independent until the end of the Second Boer War on 31 May 1902, when it was forced to surrender to the British after Lord Kitchener authorised the use of a scorched earth policy and concentration camps to hold captured Boer women and children. More than 27,000 of these civilians died as result. After the war the territory of the ZAR became the Transvaal Colony
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Setshele I
Sechele I a Motswasele "Rra Mokonopi" (1812–1892), also known as Setshele, was the ruler of the Kwêna people of Botswana. He was converted to Christianity by David Livingstone and in his role as ruler served as a missionary among his own and other African peoples. According to Livingstone biographer Stephen Tomkins, Sechele was Livingstone's only African convert to Christianity, even though Livingstone himself came to regard Sechele as a "backslider".[5] Sechele led the a coalition of Batswana (baKwêna, Bakaa, Balete, Batlokwa) in the Battle of Dimawe in 1852. Sechele was born in 1812, the son of the chief of the Kwêna tribe of Tswana people of what is modern-day Botswana.[5] When Sechele was ten years old, his father was killed and the leadership of the tribe was divided between his two uncles
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Tswana Language

The Tswana language (Setswana) is a Bantu language spoken in Southern Africa by about 8,2 million people.[1] It is a Bantu language belonging to the Niger–Congo language family within the Sotho-Tswana branch of Zone S (S.30), and is closely related to the Northern Sotho and Southern Sotho languages, as well as the Kgalagadi language and the Lozi language.[4] Setswana is an official language and lingua franca of Botswana and South Africa. Tswana-speakers are found in the north-west of South Africa, where four million people speak the language. An urbanised variety, which is part slang and not the formal Setswana, is known as Pretoria Sotho, and is the principal unique language of the city of Pretoria. It is a mixture of all Sotho languages. The three South African provinces with the most speakers are Gauteng (circa 11%), Northern Cape, and North West (over 70%)
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