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Hingham, Massachusetts
Hingham is a town in metropolitan Greater Boston on the South Shore of the U.S. state of Massachusetts in northern Plymouth County. At the 2010 census, the population was 22,157.[5] Hingham is known for its colonial history and location on Boston Harbor. The town was named after Hingham, Norfolk, England,[6] and was first settled by English colonists in 1633. The town of Hingham was dubbed "Bare Cove" by the first colonizing English in 1633, but two years later was incorporated as a town under the name "Hingham." [4][7] The land on which Hingham was settled was deeded to the English by the Wampanoag sachem Wompatuck in 1655.[8] The town was within Suffolk County from its founding in 1643 until 1803, and Plymouth County from 1803 to the present. The eastern part of the town split off to become Cohasset in 1770
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England

The 2nd-largest Christian practice is the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church. Since its reintroduction after the Catholic Emancipation, the Church has organised ecclesiastically on an England and Wales basis where there are 4.5 million members (most of whom are English).[252] There has been one Pope from England to date, Adrian IV; while saints Bede and Anselm are regarded as Doctors ofThe 2nd-largest Christian practice is the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church
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West Country

The West Country is bounded by the English Channel in the south and (perhaps partly) by the Bristol Channel in the north. However the West Country's eastern limit is not precisely defined, as different definitions are used. Some definitions are roughly synonymous with South West England,[4][5]The West Country is bounded by the English Channel in the south and (perhaps partly) by the Bristol Channel in the north. However the West Country's eastern limit is not precisely defined, as different definitions are used. Some definitions are roughly synonymous with South West England,[4][5][6] while others refer to only the southwestern part,[7] or in a wider sense to include areas such as Herefordshire (in the West Midlands region). West Country Carnival events take place in Devon, Dorset, Somerset and Wiltshire
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Magdalene College, Cambridge
Coordinates: 52°12′38″N 0°06′59″E / 52.2105°N 0.1165°E / 52.2105; 0.1165 (Magdalene College) Magdalene College (/ˈmɔːdlɪn/ MAWD-lin)[6] is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge. The college was founded in 1428 as a Benedictine hostel, in time coming to be known as Buckingham College, before being refounded in 1542 as the College of St Mary Magdalene. Magdalene counted some of the greatest men in the realm among its benefactors, including Britain's premier noble the Duke of Norfolk, the Duke of Buckingham and Lord Chief Justice Christopher Wray.[7] Thomas Audley, Lord Chancellor under Henry VIII, was responsible for the refoundation of the college and also established its motto—garde ta foy (Old French: "keep your faith")
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Chancel
In church architecture, the chancel is the space around the altar, including the choir and the sanctuary (sometimes called the presbytery), at the liturgical east end of a traditional Christian church building.[1] It may terminate in an apse. The chancel is generally the area used by the clergy and choir during worship, while the congregation is in the nave. Direct access may be provided by a priest's door, usually on the south side of the church.[2] This is one definition, sometimes called the "strict" one; in practice in churches where the eastern end contains other elements such as an ambulatory and side chapels, these are also often counted as part of the chancel, especially when discussing architecture.[3] In smaller churches, where the altar is backed by the outside east wall and there is no distinct choir, the chancel and sanctuary may be the same area
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Church Of England

Bishop Peter Ball was convicted in October 2015 on several charges of indecent assault against young adult men.[141] There are allegations of large-scale earlier cover-ups involving many British establishment figures which prevented Ball's earlier prosecution. There have also been allegations of Despite assurances from senior Church leadership there is concern that not enough may be done and historic abuse may still sometimes be covered up. Keith Porteous Wood of the National Secular Society stated: The problem wasn't that bishops weren't trained in such matters, it is the institutional culture of denial and the bullying of the abused and whistleblowers into silence. One report suggests that 13 bishops ignored letters written in the 1990s warning of abuse by Ball on behalf of a victim who later committed suicide. I have seen evidence that such bullying persists to this day
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Trainband
Trainbands or Trained Bands were companies of militia in England or the Americas,[1][2][3] first organized in the 16th century and dissolved in the 18th. The term was used after this time to describe the London militia. In the early American colonies the trainband was the most basic tactical unit.[4] However, no standard company size existed and variations were wide. As population grew these companies were organized into regiments to allow better management.[4] But trainbands were not combat units. Generally, upon reaching a certain age a man was required to join the local trainband in which he received periodic training for the next couple of decades. In wartime, military forces were formed by selecting men from trainbands on an individual basis and then forming them into a fighting unit. The exact derivation and usage is not clear
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New England Town
The New England town, generally referred to in New England simply as a town, is the basic unit of local government and local division of state authority in each of the six New England states and without a direct counterpart in most other U.S. states. New England towns overlay the entire area of a state, similar to civil townships in other states where they exist, but they are fully functioning municipal corporations, possessing powers similar to cities in other states. New Jersey's system of equally powerful townships, boroughs, towns, and cities is the system which is most similar to that of New England. New England towns are often governed by a town meeting legislative body. The great majority of municipal corporations in New England are based on the town model; there, statutory forms based on the concept of a compact populated place are uncommon, though elsewhere in the U.S. they are prevalent
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