HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Hesperornis
†H. regalis Marsh, 1872 †H. crassipes (Marsh, 1876) †H. gracilis Marsh, 1876 †H. altus (Marsh, 1893) †H. montana Schufeldt, 1915 †H. rossicus Nesov & Yarkov, 1993 †H. bairdi Martin & Lim, 2002 †H. chowi Martin & Lim, 2002 †H. macdonaldi Martin & Lim, 2002 †H. mengeli Martin & Lim, 2002 †H. lumgairi Aotsuka & Sato, 2016 (in press) [1]SynonymsLestornis Marsh, 1876 Coniornis Marsh, 1893 Hargeria Lucas, 1903 Hesperornis
Hesperornis
(meaning "western bird") is a genus of penguin-like bird that spanned the first half of the Campanian
Campanian
age of the Late Cretaceous
Cretaceous
period (83.5–78 mya). One of the lesser-known discoveries of the paleontologist O. C. Marsh in the late 19th century Bone Wars, it was an early find in the history of avian paleontology
[...More...]

picture info

Tanaidacea
The crustacean order Tanaidacea
Tanaidacea
(known as tanaids) make up a minor group within the class Malacostraca. There are about 940 species in this order.Contents1 Description 2 Habitat 3 Life cycle 4 Taxonomy 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDescription[edit] Tanaids are small, shrimp-like creatures ranging from 0.5 to 120 millimetres (0.020 to 4.7 in) in adult size, with most species being from 2 to 5 millimetres (0.08 to 0.2 in). Their carapace covers the first two segments of the thorax. There are three pairs of limbs on the thorax; a small pair of maxillipeds, a pair of large clawed gnathopods, and a pair of pereiopods adapted for burrowing into the mud. Unusually among crustaceans, the remaining six thoracic segments have no limbs at all, but each of the first five abdominal segments normally carry pleopods
[...More...]

picture info

Canada
Coordinates: 60°N 95°W / 60°N 95°W / 60; -95Canada Flag Coat of arms Motto: A Mari Usque Ad Mare  (Latin)"From Sea to Sea"Anthem: "O Canada"[a] CapitalOttawa45°24′N 75°40′W / 45.400°N 75.667°W / 45.400; -75.667Largest cityTorontoOfficial languagesEnglishFrenchEthnic groups (2016)[2] List of ethnicities 74.3% European 14.5% Asian 5.1% Indigenous 3.4% Caribbean and Latin American 2.9% African 0.2% Oceanian Religion (2011)[3] List of religions 67.2% Christianity
[...More...]

picture info

Crustacean
Thylacocephala? † BranchiopodaPhyllopoda SarsostracaRemipedia Cephalocarida MaxillopodaThecostraca Tantulocarida Branchiura Pentastomida Mystacocarida CopepodaOstracodaMyodocopa PodocopaMalacostracaPhyllocarida Hoplocarida EumalacostracaCladistically included but traditionally excluded groupsHexapodsCrustaceans (Crustacea /krʌˈsteɪʃə/) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such familiar animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimp, krill, woodlice, and barnacles.[1] The crustacean group is usually treated as a subphylum, and thanks to recent molecular studies it is now well accepted that the crustacean group is paraphyletic, and comprises all animals in the Pancrustacea clade other than hexapods.[2] Some crustaceans are more closely related to insects and other hexapods than they are to certain other crustaceans. The 67,000 described species range in size from
[...More...]

picture info

Frederic Augustus Lucas
Frederic Augustus Lucas, Sc.D. (March 25, 1852 – February 9, 1929) was an American museum director.Contents1 Biography1.1 Career 1.2 Formative years 1.3 Legacy 1.4 Death2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksBiography[edit] Career[edit] Frederic A. Lucas was prominent in the Great American Museum movement[clarification needed], which sought to bring Natural Science to the American public. He eventually became Curator
Curator
in Chief of the Brooklyn Museum, in Brooklyn, NY
Brooklyn, NY
(1904), and subsequently enjoyed an appointment as director at the American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
in Manhattan
Manhattan
(1911). Formative years[edit]Lucas in 1918The son of a merchant seaman who was captain of a sailing vessel, he accompanied his father on two long voyages, the first (1861-1862) at the age of 9 and the second (1869-1870) when he was 17
[...More...]

picture info

Genus
A genus (/ˈdʒiːnəs/, pl. genera /ˈdʒɛnərə/) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms, as well as viruses,[1] in biology. In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus.E.g. Panthera leo
Panthera leo
(lion) and Panthera onca
Panthera onca
(jaguar) are two species within the genus Panthera. Panthera
Panthera
is a genus within the family Felidae. The composition of a genus is determined by a taxonomist. The standards for genus classification are not strictly codified, so different authorities often produce different classifications for genera
[...More...]

picture info

Aquatic Bird
The term water bird, waterbird or aquatic bird (not to be confused with wading birds) is used to refer to birds that live on or around water. Some definitions apply the term especially to birds in freshwater habitats, though others make no distinction from birds that inhabit marine environments. In addition, some water birds are more terrestrial or aquatic than others, and their adaptations will vary depending on their environment. These adaptations include webbed feet, bills and legs adapted to feed in water, and the ability to dive from the surface or the air to catch prey in water.Play mediaVideo from Danube river in Vienna (2014)The term aquatic bird is sometimes also used in this context. A related term that has a narrower meaning is waterfowl. Some birds of prey, such as ospreys and sea eagles, take prey from water but are not considered water birds
[...More...]

picture info

Mya (unit)
A year is the orbital period of the Earth
Earth
moving in its orbit around the Sun. Due to the Earth's axial tilt, the course of a year sees the passing of the seasons, marked by changes in weather, the hours of daylight, and, consequently, vegetation and soil fertility. In temperate and subpolar regions around the planet, four seasons are generally recognized: spring, summer, autumn and winter. In tropical and subtropical regions several geographical sectors do not present defined seasons; but in the seasonal tropics, the annual wet and dry seasons are recognized and tracked. The current year is 2018. A calendar year is an approximation of the number of days of the Earth's orbital period as counted in a given calendar. The Gregorian, or modern, calendar, presents its calendar year to be either a common year of 365 days or a leap year of 366 days, as do the Julian calendars; see below
[...More...]

picture info

Bone Wars
The Bone Wars, also known as the Great Dinosaur
Dinosaur
Rush,[1] was a period of intense and ruthlessly competitive fossil hunting and discovery during the Gilded Age
Gilded Age
of American history, marked by a heated rivalry between Edward Drinker Cope
Edward Drinker Cope
(of the Academy of Natural Sciences
Academy of Natural Sciences
of Philadelphia) and Othniel Charles Marsh
Othniel Charles Marsh
(of the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale). Each of the two paleontologists used underhanded methods to try to outdo the other in the field, resorting to bribery, theft, and the destruction of bones. Each scientist also sought to ruin his rival's reputation and cut off his funding, using attacks in scientific publications. Their search for fossils led them west to rich bone beds in Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming
[...More...]

picture info

Limestone
Limestone
Limestone
is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). About 10% of sedimentary rocks are limestones. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years
[...More...]

picture info

Kansas
Kansas
Kansas
/ˈkænzəs/ ( listen) is a U.S. state
U.S. state
in the Midwestern United States.[10] Its capital is Topeka
Topeka
and its largest city is Wichita. Kansas
Kansas
is named after the Kansa Native American tribe, which inhabited the area.[11] The tribe's name (natively kką:ze) is often said to mean "people of the (south) wind" although this was probably not the term's original meaning.[12][13] For thousands of years, what is now Kansas
Kansas
was home to numerous and diverse Native American tribes. Tribes in the eastern part of the state generally lived in villages along the river valleys
[...More...]

picture info

Mesozoic
The Mesozoic
Mesozoic
Era ( /ˌmɛsəˈzoʊɪk, ˌmiː-, -soʊ-/ or /ˌmɛzəˈzoʊɪk, ˌmiː-, -soʊ-/[1][2]) is an interval of geological time from about 252 to 66 million years ago. It is also called the Age of Reptiles, a phrase introduced by the 19th century paleontologist Gideon Mantell
Gideon Mantell
who viewed it as dominated by diapsids such as Iguanodon, Megalosaurus, Plesiosaurus
Plesiosaurus
and Pterodactylus. This Era is also called from a paleobotanist view the Age of Conifers.[3] Mesozoic
Mesozoic
means "middle life", deriving from the Greek prefix meso-/μεσο- for "between" and zōon/ζῷον meaning "animal" or "living being".[4] It is one of three geologic eras of the Phanerozoic Eon, preceded by the Paleozoic
Paleozoic
("ancient life") and succeeded by the Cenozoic
Cenozoic
("new life")
[...More...]

picture info

Type Species
In zoological nomenclature, a type species (species typica) is the species name with which the name of a genus or subgenus is considered to be permanently taxonomically associated, i.e., the species that contains the biological type specimen(s).[1] A similar concept is used for suprageneric groups called a type genus. In botanical nomenclature, these terms have no formal standing under the code of nomenclature, but are sometimes borrowed from zoological nomenclature. In botany, the type of a genus name is a specimen (or, rarely, an illustration) which is also the type of a species name. The species name that has that type can also be referred to as the type of the genus name
[...More...]

picture info

Teeth
A tooth (plural teeth) is a hard, calcified structure found in the jaws (or mouths) of many vertebrates and used to break down food. Some animals, particularly carnivores, also use teeth for hunting or for defensive purposes. The roots of teeth are covered by gums. Teeth are not made of bone, but rather of multiple tissues of varying density and hardness. The cellular tissues that ultimately become teeth originate from the embryonic germ layer, the ectoderm. The general structure of teeth is similar across the vertebrates, although there is considerable variation in their form and position. The teeth of mammals have deep roots, and this pattern is also found in some fish, and in crocodilians. In most teleost fish, however, the teeth are attached to the outer surface of the bone, while in lizards they are attached to the inner surface of the jaw by one side
[...More...]

picture info

Beak
The beak, bill, or rostrum is an external anatomical structure of birds that is used for eating and for preening, manipulating objects, killing prey, fighting, probing for food, courtship and feeding young. The terms beak and rostrum are also used to refer to a similar mouth part in some dicynodonts, Ornithischians, cephalopods, cetaceans, billfishes, pufferfishes, turtles, Anuran
Anuran
tadpoles and sirens. Although beaks vary significantly in size, shape, color and texture, they share a similar underlying structure. Two bony projections—the upper and lower mandibles—are covered with a thin keratinized layer of epidermis known as the rhamphotheca
[...More...]

picture info

Theropod
Theropoda
Theropoda
(/θɪəˈrɒpədə/ or /ˌθɪərəˈpoʊdə/,[2] from Greek θηρίον "wild beast" and πούς, ποδός "foot") or theropods (/ˈθɪərəˌpɒdz/[3][4]) are a dinosaur suborder characterized by hollow bones and three-toed limbs. They are generally classed as a group of saurischian dinosaurs, though a 2017 paper[5] has put them in a proposed clade Ornithoscelida, along with the Ornithischia. Theropods were ancestrally carnivorous, although a number of theropod groups evolved to become herbivores, omnivores, piscivores, and insectivores. Theropods first appeared during the Carnian
Carnian
age of the late Triassic
Triassic
period 231.4 million years ago (Ma)[6] and included the sole large terrestrial carnivores from the Early Jurassic
Jurassic
until at least the close of the Cretaceous, about 66 Ma
[...More...]

.