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Harer
Harar
Harar
(Harari: ሐረር),[a] and known to its inhabitants as Gēy (Harari: ጌይ),[2] is a walled city in eastern Ethiopia. It was formerly the capital of Hararghe
Hararghe
and now the capital of the modern Harari Region
Harari Region
of Ethiopia. The city is located on a hilltop in the eastern extension of the Ethiopian Highlands, about five hundred kilometers from the national capital Addis Ababa
Addis Ababa
at an elevation of 1,885 meters
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Harare
Harare
Harare
(/həˈrɑːreɪ/;[3] officially called Salisbury until 1982[4]) is the capital and most populous city of Zimbabwe. Situated in the northeast of the country in the heart of historic Mashonaland, the city has an estimated population of 1,606,000 (2009),[5] with 2,800,000 in its metropolitan area (2006)
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Arab
Historically: Arabian mythology (Hubal · al-Lāt · Al-‘Uzzá · Manāt · Other Goddesses) Predominantly: Islam (Sunni · Shia · Sufi · Ibadi · Alawite · Ismaili) Sizable minority: Christianity (Eastern Orthodox · Maronite · Coptic Orthodox · Greek Orthodox · Greek Catholic · Chaldean Christian) Smaller minority: Other monotheistic religions (Druze · Bahá'í Faith · Sabianism · Bábism · Mandaeism)Related ethnic groupsOther Afroasiatic-speaking peoplesa Arab
Arab
ethnicity should not be confused with non- Arab
Arab
ethnicities that are also native to the Arab
Arab
world.[30] b Not all Arabs
Arabs
are Muslims
Muslims
and not all Muslims
Muslims
are Arabs
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Ethiopian Empire
The Ethiopian Empire
Empire
(Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ንጉሠ ነገሥት መንግሥተ, Mängəstä Ityop'p'ya), also known as Abyssinia (derived from the Arabic al-Habash),[10] was a kingdom that spanned a geographical area in the current state of Ethiopia
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Zaila
Zeila
Zeila
(Somali: Saylac, Arabic: زيلع‎), also known as Zaila or Zeyla, is a port city in the northwestern Awdal
Awdal
region of Somaliland.[1] In the Middle Ages, the Jewish traveller Benjamin of Tudela
Benjamin of Tudela
identified Zeila
Zeila
(or Zawilah) with the Biblical location of Havilah.[2] Most modern scholars identify it with the site of Avalites mentioned in the 1st-century Greco-Roman travelogue the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea and in Ptolemy, although this is not undisputed.[3][4] The town evolved into an early Islamic center with the arrival of Muslims shortly after the hegira
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Benjamin Tudela
Benjamin of Tudela
Benjamin of Tudela
(Hebrew: בִּנְיָמִין מִטּוּדֶלָה‬, pronounced [binjaˈmin mituˈdela]; Arabic: بنيامين التطيلي‎;‎ Tudela, Kingdom of Navarre, 1130 – Castile, 1173) was a medieval Jewish
Jewish
traveler who visited Europe, Asia, and Africa
Africa
in the 12th century. His vivid descriptions of western Asia
Asia
preceded those of Marco Polo
Marco Polo
by a hundred years. With his broad education and vast knowledge of languages, Benjamin of Tudela
Benjamin of Tudela
is a major figure in medieval geography and Jewish history. The Travels of Benjamin is an important work not only as a description of the Jewish
Jewish
communities, but also as a reliable source about the geography and ethnography of the Middle Ages
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Havilah
Havilah (Hebrew: חֲוִילָה‎ Ḥăwîlāh, "Circular"[1]), refers to both a land and people in several books of the Bible.Contents1 Biblical mentions 2 Extra-biblical mentions 3 Possible location 4 ReferencesBiblical mentions[edit] Havilah is mentioned in Genesis 2:10-11And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became into four heads. The name of the first is Pison: that is it which compasseth the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold;In addition to the region described in chapter 2 of Genesis two individuals named Havilah are listed in the Table of Nations
Table of Nations
which lists the descendants of Noah, who are considered eponymous ancestors of nations. They are mentioned in Genesis 10:7-29 and 1 Chronicles 1:9-23
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Al-Habash
Al-Habash was an ancient region in the Horn of Africa. Situated in the northern highlands of modern-day Eritrea
Eritrea
and Ethiopia,[1] it was inhabited by the Habash or Abyssinians, who were the forebears of the Habesha people.[2] Along with the neighboring Barbaroi (Berbers) of Barbara, the Habash are recorded in the 1st century Greek travelogue the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea as engaging in extensive commercial trade with Egypt, among other areas
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Argobba People
The Argobba are an ethnic group inhabiting Ethiopia. A Muslim community, they are spread out through isolated village networks and towns in the northeastern and eastern parts of the country. Group members have typically been astute traders and merchants, and have adjusted to the economic trends in their area. These factors have led to a decline in usage of the Argobba language.[2][3]Contents1 Distribution 2 Language 3 See also 4 References 5 External links 6 Further readingDistribution[edit] Argobba communities can be found in the Afar, Harari, Amhara, and Oromia Regions, in and along the Great Rift Valley. They include Yimlawo, Gusa, Shonke, Berehet, Khayr Amba, Melka Jilo, Aliyu Amba, Metehara, Shewa Robit, and the surrounding rural villages.[4] Language[edit] The Argobba traditionally speak the Argobba language, an Afro-Asiatic tongue of the Semitic branch. In some places, Argobba has homogenized with Oromo
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Sultanate Of Mogadishu
The Sultanate of Mogadishu
Mogadishu
(Somali: Saldanadda Muqdisho, Arabic: سلطنة مقديشو‎) (fl. 9th-13th centuries[1]), also known as the Kingdom of Magadazo,[1] was a medieval Somali trading empire centered in southern Somalia. It rose as one of the preeminent powers in the Horn of Africa
Horn of Africa
during the 10th, 11th and 12th centuries, before being served as the capital for the Ajuran Empire
Ajuran Empire
during the early 13th century. The Mogadishu
Mogadishu
Sultanate maintained a vast trading network, dominated the regional gold trade, minted its own currency, and left an extensive architectural legacy in present-day southern Somalia
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Amda Seyon I
Amda Seyon I
Amda Seyon I
(also Amde Tsiyon and other variants, Ge'ez
Ge'ez
ዐምደ ፡ ጽዮን ʿamda ṣiyōn, Amharic
Amharic
āmde ṣiyōn, "Pillar of Zion") was Emperor of Ethiopia
Emperor of Ethiopia
(1314–1344;[1] throne name Gebre Mesqel Ge'ez
Ge'ez
ገብረ ፡ መስቀል gabra masḳal, Amh. gebre mesḳel, "slave of the cross"), and a member of the Solomonic dynasty. According to the British expert on Ethiopia, Edward Ullendorff, "Amde Tseyon was one of the most outstanding Ethiopian kings of any age and a singular figure dominating the Horn of Africa
Horn of Africa
in the fourteenth century."[2] His conquests of Muslim
Muslim
borderlands greatly expanded Ethiopian territory and power in the region, maintained for centuries after his death
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Poetry
Poetry
Poetry
(the term derives from a variant of the Greek term, poiesis, "making") is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic[1][2][3] qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning. Poetry
Poetry
has a long history, dating back to the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh. Early poems evolved from folk songs such as the Chinese Shijing, or from a need to retell oral epics, as with the Sanskrit Vedas, Zoroastrian Gathas, and the Homeric epics, the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey. Ancient attempts to define poetry, such as Aristotle's Poetics, focused on the uses of speech in rhetoric, drama, song and comedy
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Defensive Wall
A defensive wall is a fortification usually used to protect a city, town or other settlement from potential aggressors. In ancient to modern times, they were used to enclose settlements. Generally, these are referred to as city walls or town walls, although there were also walls, such as the Great Wall
Wall
of China, Walls of Benin, Hadrian's Wall, Anastasian Wall, the Cyclopean
Cyclopean
Wall
Wall
Rajgir[1] and the metaphorical Atlantic Wall, which extended far beyond the borders of a city and were used to enclose regions or mark territorial boundaries. In mountainous terrain, defensive walls such as letzis were used in combination with castles to seal valleys from potential attack
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Coffee
Coffee
Coffee
is a brewed drink prepared from roasted coffee beans, which are the seeds of berries from the Coffea
Coffea
plant. The genus Coffea
Coffea
is native to tropical Africa (specifically having its origin in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and Sudan) and Madagascar, the Comoros, Mauritius, and Réunion
Réunion
in the Indian Ocean.[2] The plant was exported from Africa to countries around the world. Coffee
Coffee
plants are now cultivated in over 70 countries, primarily in the equatorial regions of the Americas, Southeast Asia, India, and Africa. The two most commonly grown are arabica and robusta. Once ripe, coffee berries are picked, processed, and dried. Dried coffee seeds (referred to as beans) are roasted to varying degrees, depending on the desired flavor
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Weaving
Weaving
Weaving
is a method of textile production in which two distinct sets of yarns or threads are interlaced at right angles to form a fabric or cloth. Other methods are knitting, crocheting, felting, and braiding or plaiting. The longitudinal threads are called the warp and the lateral threads are the weft or filling. ( Weft
Weft
or is an old English word meaning "that which is woven".[a]) The method in which these threads are inter-woven affects the characteristics of the cloth.[1] Cloth
Cloth
is usually woven on a loom, a device that holds the warp threads in place while filling threads are woven through them. A fabric band which meets this definition of cloth (warp threads with a weft thread winding between) can also be made using other methods, including tablet weaving, back-strap, or other techniques without looms.[2] The way the warp and filling threads interlace with each other is called the weave
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