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Hardback
A hardcover or hardback (also known as hardbound, and sometimes as case-bound) book is one bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with buckram or other cloth, heavy paper, or occasionally leather). It has a flexible, sewn spine which allows the book to lie flat on a surface when opened. Following the ISBN
ISBN
sequence numbers, books of this type may be identified by the abbreviation Hbk.Detail of "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea", first English edition (1873), showing cloth pattern on cover Hardcover
Hardcover
books are often printed on acid-free paper, and they are much more durable than paperbacks, which have flexible, easily damaged paper covers. Hardcover
Hardcover
books are marginally more costly to manufacture
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Hardcover (film)
Hardcover is a 2008 German comedy film directed by Christian Zübert.[1] Cast[edit]Wotan Wilke Möhring as Dominik 'Nick' 'Dom' Adler Lucas Gregorowicz as Christoph 'Goethe' Kreiss Justus von Dohnányi as Chico Waidner Anna Dereszowska as Ewa Lisa Potthoff as Sandy Charly Hübner as Klaus Filip Peeters as Kommissar Jürgens Sybille J. Schedwill as Chefin Autovermietung Eric Bouwer as Captain Cock Sebastian Kroehnert as Sir Fuckalot Daniel Flieger as Claus von Punani Ioan Gyuri Pascu as Thailand EmilReferences[edit]^ Kohl, Philipp (2008-04-03). "Ein Möchtegernliterat unter Gangstern". Die Welt. Retrieved 2016-03-11. External links[edit]Hardcover on IMDbThis article related to a German film of the 2000s is a stub
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Authors' Editor
An authors' editor is a language professional who works "with authors to make draft texts fit for purpose".[1] He or she edits manuscripts that have been drafted by the author (or authors) but have not yet been submitted to a publisher for publication.[2] This type of editing is called author editing, to distinguish it from other types of editing done for publishers on documents already accepted for publication: an authors' editor works "with (and, commonly, for) an author rather than for a publisher".[3] A term sometimes used synonymously with authors' editor is "manuscript editor" which, however, is less precise as it also refers to editors employed by scholarly journals to edit manuscripts after acceptance (in place of the term copy editor).[4] Authors' editors usually work with academic authors, researchers and scientists writing scholarly journal articles, books and grant proposals.[5] Thus, the authors' editor facilitates the academic writing process by acting before submission o
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Literary Agent
A literary agent (sometimes publishing agent, or writer's representative) is an agent who represents writers and their written works to publishers, theatrical producers, film producers, and film studios, and assists in the sale and deal negotiation of the same. Literary agents most often represent novelists, screenwriters, and non-fiction writers. They are paid a fixed percentage (usually twenty percent on foreign sales and ten to fifteen percent for domestic sales)[1] of the proceeds of sales they negotiate on behalf of their clients.Contents1 Advantages 2 Diversity 3 Cost 4 Querying 5 Notable agents 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksAdvantages[edit] Literary agents perform various services for authors
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Publisher's Reader
A publisher's reader or first reader is a person paid by a publisher or book club to read manuscripts from the slush pile, and to advise their employers as to quality and marketability of the work. In the US, most publishers use a full-time employee for this, if they do it at all. That employee is called an editorial assistant. Most publishers in the US prefer to receive some type of shorter query, decide if the subject and author fit their current plans, and then request a copy of the manuscript. When a writer ignores this request or guideline, and sends a full manuscript, many publishers return them unopened. These publishers, then, wouldn't have anyone "reading slush." The first person to read the submissions can exercise considerable influence over the offerings of the publishers for whom they work, and many unknown writers owed their first sale to a sympathetic publishers' reader or editorial assistant
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Intellectual Property
Intellectual property
Intellectual property
(or "IP") is a category of property that includes intangible creations of the human intellect, and primarily encompasses copyrights, patents, and trademarks. It also includes other types of rights, such as trade secrets, publicity rights, moral rights, and rights against unfair competition. Artistic works like music and literature, as well as some discoveries, inventions, words, phrases, symbols, and designs can all be protected as intellectual property.[1][2] Intellectual property
Intellectual property
law has evolved over centuries. It was not until the 19th century that the term "intellectual property" began to be used, and not until the late 20th century that it became commonplace in the majority of the world.[3] The main purpose of intellectual property law is to encourage the creation of a large variety of intellectual goods
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Editing
Editing
Editing
is the process of selecting and preparing written, visual, audible, and film media used to convey information. The editing process can involve correction, condensation, organization, and many other modifications performed with an intention of producing a correct, consistent, accurate and complete work.[1] The editing process often begins with the author's idea for the work itself, continuing as a collaboration between the author and the editor as the work is created. As such, editing can involve creative skills, human relations and a precise set of methods.[2][3]Editors work on producing an issue of Bild, West Berlin, 1977. Previous front pages are affixed to the wall behind them.There are various editorial positions in publishing. Typically, one finds editorial assistants reporting to the senior-level editorial staff and directors who report to senior executive editors
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Literary Editor
A literary editor is an editor in a newspaper, magazine or similar publication who deals with aspects concerning literature and books, especially reviews.[1] A literary editor may also help with editing books themselves, by providing services such as proof reading, copy-editing, and literary criticism. Consulting editor[edit] A consulting editor is a non-staff, independent literary editor.[citation needed] A consulting editor may be an independent, freelance editor, or a scholar providing expertise via consulting. See also[edit]Developmental editor Book
Book
editorReferences[edit]^ The Literary
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Commissioning Editor
In book publishing, a commissioning editor is essentially a buyer. It is the job of the commissioning editor to advise the publishing house on which books to publish. Usually the actual decision of whether to contract a book is taken by a senior manager rather than the editor.Contents1 Responsibilities 2 The commissioning process 3 The role 4 Qualities 5 References 6 External linksResponsibilities[edit] The other roles of commissioning editors vary between companies. Usually they are also responsible for ensuring that authors under contract deliver typescripts to specification and on time. They thus have an author management role. They usually have responsibility for ensuring that typescripts are of sufficient quality
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Developmental Editor
Developmental editing is a form of writing support that comes into play before or during the production of a publishable manuscript, especially in the area of non-fiction writing. As explained by Scott Norton in his book Developmental editing: a handbook for freelancers, authors, and publishers, developmental editing involves "significant structuring or restructuring of a manuscript's discourse".[1] Developmental editors are a type of language professional.Contents1 The work of developmental editors 2 Textbooks 3 In the setting of academic research 4 ReferencesThe work of developmental editors[edit] A developmental editor may guide an author (or group of authors) in conceiving the topic, planning the overall structure, and developing an outline—and may coach authors in their writing, chapter by chapter
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Book Editor
Editing
Editing
is the process of selecting and preparing written, visual, audible, and film media used to convey information. The editing process can involve correction, condensation, organization, and many other modifications performed with an intention of producing a correct, consistent, accurate and complete work.[1] The editing process often begins with the author's idea for the work itself, continuing as a collaboration between the author and the editor as the work is created. As such, editing can involve creative skills, human relations and a precise set of methods.[2][3]Editors work on producing an issue of Bild, West Berlin, 1977. Previous front pages are affixed to the wall behind them.There are various editorial positions in publishing. Typically, one finds editorial assistants reporting to the senior-level editorial staff and directors who report to senior executive editors
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Book
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
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Book Design
Book
Book
design is the art of incorporating the content, style, format, design, and sequence of the various components and elements of a book into a coherent whole. In the words of the renowned typographer Jan Tschichold (1902–1974), book design, "though largely forgotten today, [relies upon] methods and rules upon which it is impossible to improve, [and which] have been developed over centuries
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Typesetting
Typesetting
Typesetting
is the composition of text by means of arranging physical types[1] or the digital equivalents. Stored letters and other symbols (called sorts in mechanical systems and glyphs in digital systems) are retrieved and ordered according to a language's orthography for visual display. Typesetting
Typesetting
requires one or more fonts (which are widely but erroneously confused with and substituted for typefaces)
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Proofreading
Proofreading is the reading of a galley proof or an electronic copy of a publication to detect and correct production errors of text or art.[1]Contents1 Professional1.1 Traditional method 1.2 Alternative methods 1.3 Style guides and checklists 1.4 Qualifications 1.5 Proofreader testing 1.6 Economics 1.7 Vs copy-editing2 Self 3 Digital 4 In fiction 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksProfessional[edit] Traditional method[edit] A proof is a typeset version of copy or a manuscript page. They often contain typos introduced through human error. Traditionally, a proofreader looks at an increment of text on the copy and then compares it to the corresponding typeset increment, and then marks any errors (sometimes called line edits) using standard proofreaders' marks.[2] Unlike copy editing, proofreading's defining procedure is to work directly with two sets of information at the same time
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List Of Proofreader's Marks
This article is a list of standard proofreader's marks used to indicate and correct problems in a text. Marks come in two varieties, abbreviations and abstract symbols. These are usually handwritten on the paper containing the text. Symbols are interleaved in the text, while abbreviations may be placed in a margin with an arrow pointing to the problematic text
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