HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1500] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Hardback
A HARDCOVER or HARDBACK (also known as HARDBOUND, and sometimes as CASE-BOUND) book is one bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with buckram or other cloth , heavy paper , or occasionally leather ). It has a flexible, sewn spine which allows the book to lie flat on a surface when opened. Following the ISBN sequence numbers, books of this type may be identified by the abbreviation _Hbk_. Detail of "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea", first English edition (1873), showing cloth pattern on cover Hardcover books are often printed on acid-free paper , and are much more durable than paperbacks , which have flexible, easily damaged paper covers. Hardcover books are marginally more costly to manufacture. Hardcovers are frequently protected by artistic dust jackets , but a "jacketless" alternative is becoming increasingly popular: these "paper-over-board" or "jacketless hardcover" bindings forgo the dust jacket in favor of printing the cover design directly onto the board binding. CONTENTS * 1 Marketing * 2 Prices * 3 Typical structure * 4 Gallery * 5 See also * 6 References MARKETINGIf brisk sales are anticipated, a hardcover edition of a book is typically released first, followed by a "trade" paperback edition (same format as hardcover) the next year. Some publishers publish paperback originals if slow hardback sales are anticipated
[...More...]

"Hardback" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hardcover (film)
HARDCOVER is a 2008 German comedy film directed by Christian Zübert . CAST * Wotan Wilke Möhring as Dominik 'Nick' 'Dom' Adler * Lucas Gregorowicz as Christoph 'Goethe' Kreiss * Justus von Dohnányi as Chico Waidner * Anna Dereszowska as Ewa * Lisa Potthoff as Sandy * Charly Hübner as Klaus * Filip Peeters as Kommissar Jürgens * Sybille J. Schedwill as Chefin Autovermietung * Eric Bouwer as Captain Cock * Sebastian Kroehnert as Sir Fuckalot * Daniel Flieger as Claus von Punani * Ioan Gyuri Pascu as Thailand EmilREFERENCES * ^ Kohl, Philipp (2008-04-03). "Ein Möchtegernliterat unter Gangstern". Die Welt
[...More...]

"Hardcover (film)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Book
A BOOK is a set of sheets of paper , parchment , or similar materials that are fastened together to hinge at one side. A single sheet within a book is a leaf , and each side of a leaf is a page . Writing or images can be printed or drawn on a book's pages. An electronic image that is formatted to resemble a book on a computer screen, smartphone or e-reader device is known as an electronic book or e-book . The term "books" may also refer to a body of works of literature , or a main division of literature (e.g., children\'s literature ) . In library and information science , a book is called a monograph , to distinguish it from serial periodicals such as magazines , journals , or newspapers . In novels and sometimes other types of books (for example, biographies), a book may be divided into several large sections, also called books ( Book 1, Book 2, Book 3, and so on). An avid reader or collector of books or a book lover is a bibliophile or colloquially, "bookworm". A shop where books are bought and sold is a bookshop or bookstore. Books are also sold in some department stores, drugstores and newspaper vendors. Books can also be borrowed from libraries . Google has estimated that as of 2010, approximately 130,000,000 distinct titles had been published. In some wealthier nations, the sale of printed books has decreased because of the use of e-books , though sales of e-books declined in the first half of 2015
[...More...]

"Book" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bookbinding
BOOKBINDING is the process of physically assembling a book from an ordered stack of paper sheets that are folded together into sections or sometimes left as a stack of individual sheets. The stack is then bound together along one edge by either sewing with thread through the folds or by a layer of flexible adhesive. For protection, the bound stack is either wrapped in a flexible cover or attached to stiff boards. Finally, an attractive cover is adhered to the boards and a label with identifying information is attached to the covers along with additional decoration. Book artists or specialists in book decoration can greatly expand the previous explanation to include book like objects of visual art with high value and artistic merit of exceptional quality in addition to the book's content of text and illustrations. Before the computer age, the bookbinding trade involved two divisions. First, there was STATIONERY binding (known as vellum binding in the trade) which deals with making new books to be written into and intended for handwritten entries such as accounting ledgers, business journals, blank books, and guest log books, along with other general office stationery such as note books , manifold books, day books, diaries, portfolios, etc. Second was LETTERPRESS binding which deals with making new books intended to be read from and includes library binding , fine binding, edition binding, and publisher's bindings
[...More...]

"Bookbinding" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Binder's Board
BOOKBINDING is the process of physically assembling a book from an ordered stack of paper sheets that are folded together into sections or sometimes left as a stack of individual sheets. The stack is then bound together along one edge by either sewing with thread through the folds or by a layer of flexible adhesive. For protection, the bound stack is either wrapped in a flexible cover or attached to stiff boards. Finally, an attractive cover is adhered to the boards and a label with identifying information is attached to the covers along with additional decoration. Book
Book
artists or specialists in book decoration can greatly expand the previous explanation to include book like objects of visual art with high value and artistic merit of exceptional quality in addition to the book's content of text and illustrations. Before the computer age, the bookbinding trade involved two divisions. First, there was STATIONERY binding (known as vellum binding in the trade) which deals with making new books to be written into and intended for handwritten entries such as accounting ledgers, business journals, blank books, and guest log books, along with other general office stationery such as note books , manifold books, day books, diaries, portfolios, etc. Second was LETTERPRESS binding which deals with making new books intended to be read from and includes library binding , fine binding, edition binding, and publisher's bindings
[...More...]

"Binder's Board" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Buckram
BUCKRAM is a stiff cloth , made of cotton , and still occasionally linen , which is used to cover and protect books . Buckram can also be used to stiffen clothes . Modern buckrams have been stiffened by soaking in a substance, usually now pyroxylin , to fill the gaps between the fibres. In the Middle Ages , "bokeram" was fine cotton cloth, not stiff. The etymology of the term is uncertain; the commonly mentioned derivation from Bokhara is, according to the _ Oxford English Dictionary _, uncertain. Millinery buckram is different from bookbinding buckram. It is impregnated with a starch, which allows it to be softened in water, pulled over a hat block , and left to dry into a hard shape. White buckram is most commonly used in hatmaking, though black is available as well. Millinery buckram comes in three weights: baby buckram (often used for children's and dolls' hats), single-ply buckram, and double buckram (also known as "theatrical crown"). American-made Buckram book cloth is a poly-cotton base cloth coated in aqueous acrylic. It was designed to withstand heavy use in libraries and offers strength, moisture resistance and mildew resistance. Buckram is available in different grades. It also can be used in electric boards for binding and is very stretchable. In the US, F grade buckram is offered in 15 glossy colors
[...More...]

"Buckram" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cloth
A TEXTILE or CLOTH is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread ). Yarn is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool , flax , cotton , hemp , or other material to produce long strands. Textiles are formed by weaving , knitting , crocheting , knotting , or felting . The words _FABRIC_ and _cloth_ are used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking ) as synonyms for _textile_. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. _Textile_ refers to any material made of interlacing fibres. A _fabric_ is a material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.). _Cloth_ may be used synonymously with _fabric_ but is often a finished piece of fabric used for a specific purpose (e.g., _table cloth_). Alpaca textile at the Otavalo Artisan Market in the Andes Mountains, Ecuador CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 History * 3 Uses * 4 Sources and types * 4.1 Animal textiles * 4.2 Plant textiles * 4.3 Mineral textiles * 4.4 Synthetic textiles * 5 Production methods * 6 Treatments * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 Further reading ETYMOLOGYThe word 'textile' is from Latin , from the adjective _textilis_, meaning 'woven', from _textus_, the past participle of the verb _texere_, 'to weave'
[...More...]

"Cloth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Paper
PAPER is a thin material produced by pressing together moist fibres of cellulose pulp derived from wood , rags or grasses , and drying them into flexible sheets. It is a versatile material with many uses, including writing , printing , packaging, cleaning , and a number of industrial and construction processes. The pulp papermaking process is said to have been developed in China during the early 2nd century CE, possibly as early as the year 105 CE, by the Han court eunuch Cai Lun , although the earliest archaeological fragments of paper derive from the 2nd century BCE in China. The modern pulp and paper industry is global, with China leading its production and the United States right behind it. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Early sources of fibre * 3 Etymology * 4 Papermaking * 4.1 Chemical pulping * 4.2 Mechanical pulping * 4.3 De-inked pulp * 4.4 Additives * 4.5 Producing paper * 4.6 Finishing * 4.6.1 Paper grain * 5 Applications * 6 Types, thickness and weight * 7 Paper stability * 8 Environmental impact of paper * 9 Future of paper * 10 See also * 11 Notes * 12 References * 13 Further reading * 14 External links HISTORY Main article: History of paper Hemp wrapping paper , China, circa 100 BC. The oldest known archaeological fragments of the immediate precursor to modern paper, date to the 2nd century BCE in China
[...More...]

"Paper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Calf-binding
BOOKBINDING is the process of physically assembling a book from an ordered stack of paper sheets that are folded together into sections or sometimes left as a stack of individual sheets. The stack is then bound together along one edge by either sewing with thread through the folds or by a layer of flexible adhesive. For protection, the bound stack is either wrapped in a flexible cover or attached to stiff boards. Finally, an attractive cover is adhered to the boards and a label with identifying information is attached to the covers along with additional decoration. Book
Book
artists or specialists in book decoration can greatly expand the previous explanation to include book like objects of visual art with high value and artistic merit of exceptional quality in addition to the book's content of text and illustrations. Before the computer age, the bookbinding trade involved two divisions. First, there was STATIONERY binding (known as vellum binding in the trade) which deals with making new books to be written into and intended for handwritten entries such as accounting ledgers, business journals, blank books, and guest log books, along with other general office stationery such as note books , manifold books, day books, diaries, portfolios, etc. Second was LETTERPRESS binding which deals with making new books intended to be read from and includes library binding , fine binding, edition binding, and publisher's bindings
[...More...]

"Calf-binding" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

ISBN
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero). Occasionally, a book may appear without a printed ISBN if it is printed privately or the author does not follow the usual ISBN procedure; however, this can be rectified later. Another identifier, the International Standard Serial Number (ISSN), identifies periodical publications such as magazines ; and the International Standard Music Number (ISMN) covers for musical scores
[...More...]

"ISBN" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Acid-free Paper
ACID-FREE PAPER is paper that if infused in water yields a neutral or basic pH (7 or slightly greater). It can be made from any cellulose fiber as long as the active acid pulp is eliminated during processing. It is also lignin - and sulfur -free. Acid-free paper
Acid-free paper
addresses the problem of preserving documents and artwork for long periods. CONTENTS * 1 Overview * 2 Standards * 3 Archival paper * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links OVERVIEW Paper
Paper
made from wood-based pulp that has not had its lignin removed turns yellow, becomes brittle, and deteriorates over time. When exposed to light and/or heat, the molecules in the acidic paper will break down even faster. Acidic wood-pulp paper became commonplace in the late 19th century, and in the 1930s William Barrow (a chemist and librarian) published a report about the deterioration of acidic paper in the libraries. For fear of the gradual disintegration of written materials, measures have since been taken to improve the quality of paper. During production, acid-free paper may be treated with a mild base (usually calcium or magnesium bicarbonate ) to neutralize the natural acids occurring in wood pulp , and it may also be buffered to prevent the formation of additional acids (as may develop from the application of sizing )
[...More...]

"Acid-free Paper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Paperback
A PAPERBACK is a type of book characterized by a thick paper or paperboard cover, and often held together with glue rather than stitches or staples . In contrast, hardcover or hardback books are bound with cardboard covered with cloth. The pages on the inside are made of paper. Inexpensive books bound in paper have existed since at least the 19th century in such forms as pamphlets , yellowbacks , dime novels , and airport novels . Modern paperbacks can be differentiated by size. In the U.S., there are "mass-market paperbacks " and larger, more durable "trade paperbacks ." In the U.K., there are A-format, B-format , and the largest C-format sizes. Paperback editions of books are issued when a publisher decides to release a book in a low-cost format. Cheaper, lower quality paper; glued (rather than stapled or sewn) bindings; and the lack of a hard cover may contribute to the lower cost of paperbacks. Paperbacks can be the preferred medium when a book is not expected to be a major seller or where the publisher wishes to release a book without putting forth a large investment. Examples include many novels, and newer editions or reprintings of older books. Since hardcovers tend to have a larger profit margin , many publishers try to balance the profit to be made by selling fewer hardcovers against the potential profit to be made by selling more paperbacks with a smaller profit per unit
[...More...]

"Paperback" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dust Jacket
The DUST JACKET (sometimes BOOK JACKET, DUST WRAPPER or DUST COVER) of a book is the detachable outer cover, usually made of paper and printed with text and illustrations. This outer cover has folded flaps that hold it to the front and back book covers . Often the back panel or flaps are printed with biographical information about the author, a summary of the book from the publisher (known as a blurb ), and/or critical praise from celebrities or authorities in the book's subject area. In addition to its promotional role, the dust jacket protects the book covers from damage. However, since it is itself relatively fragile, and since dust jackets have practical, aesthetic, and sometimes financial value, the jacket may in turn be wrapped in another jacket, usually transparent, especially if the book is a library volume. CONTENTS* 1 Early history * 1.1 Oldest dust jackets * 2 Late 19th and early 20th centuries * 2.1 Supplementary bands * 3 As collectible items * 4 See also * 5 Notes * 6 References * 7 External links EARLY HISTORYBefore the 1820s, most books were published as unbound sheets and were generally sold to customers either in this form, or in simple bindings executed for the bookseller, or in bespoke bindings commissioned by the customer. At this date, publishers did not have their books bound in uniform "house" bindings, so there was no reason for them to issue dust jackets
[...More...]

"Dust Jacket" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mass Market Paperback
A PAPERBACK is a type of book characterized by a thick paper or paperboard cover, and often held together with glue rather than stitches or staples . In contrast, hardcover or hardback books are bound with cardboard covered with cloth. The pages on the inside are made of paper. Inexpensive books bound in paper have existed since at least the 19th century in such forms as pamphlets , yellowbacks , dime novels , and airport novels . Modern paperbacks can be differentiated by size. In the U.S., there are "mass-market paperbacks " and larger, more durable "trade paperbacks ." In the U.K., there are A-format, B-format , and the largest C-format sizes. Paperback editions of books are issued when a publisher decides to release a book in a low-cost format. Cheaper, lower quality paper; glued (rather than stapled or sewn) bindings; and the lack of a hard cover may contribute to the lower cost of paperbacks. Paperbacks can be the preferred medium when a book is not expected to be a major seller or where the publisher wishes to release a book without putting forth a large investment. Examples include many novels, and newer editions or reprintings of older books. Since hardcovers tend to have a larger profit margin , many publishers try to balance the profit to be made by selling fewer hardcovers against the potential profit to be made by selling more paperbacks with a smaller profit per unit
[...More...]

"Mass Market Paperback" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Typeset
TYPESETTING is the composition of text by means of arranging physical types or the digital equivalents. Stored letters and other symbols (called sorts in mechanical systems and glyphs in digital systems) are retrieved and ordered according to a language's orthography for visual display. Typesetting requires the prior process of designing a font (which is widely but erroneously confused with and substituted for typeface ). One significant effect of typesetting was that authorship of works could be spotted more easily, making it difficult for copiers who have not gained permission. CONTENTS* 1 Pre-digital era * 1.1 Manual typesetting * 1.2 Hot metal typesetting * 1.3 Phototypesetting * 2 Digital era * 2.1 SCRIPT variants * 2.2 SGML and XML
XML
systems * 2.3 Troff and successors * 2.4 TeX and La TeX * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links PRE-DIGITAL ERAMANUAL TYPESETTING Main article: Movable type During much of the letterpress era , movable type was composed by hand for each page . Cast metal sorts were composed into words, then lines, then paragraphs, then pages of text and tightly bound together to make up a form, with all letter faces exactly the same “height to paper”, creating an even surface of type. The form was placed in a press, inked, and an impression made on paper
[...More...]

"Typeset" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gore Vidal
EUGENE LOUIS "GORE" VIDAL (/ˌɡɔːr vᵻˈdɑːl/ October 3, 1925 – July 31, 2012) was an American writer and public intellectual known for his patrician manner, epigrammatic wit, and polished style of writing. He was born to a political family; his maternal grandfather, Thomas Pryor Gore , served as United States senator from Oklahoma (1907–1921 and 1931–1937). He was a Democratic Party politician who twice sought elected office; first to the United States House of Representatives (New York State, 1960), then to the U.S. Senate (California, 1982). As a political commentator and essayist, Vidal's principal subject was the history of the United States and its society, especially how the militaristic foreign policy reduced the country to a decadent empire . His political and cultural essays were published in _The Nation _, the _ New Statesman _, the _ New York Review of Books _, and _Esquire _ magazines. As a public intellectual, Gore Vidal's topical debates on sex, politics, and religion with other intellectuals and writers occasionally turned into quarrels with the likes of William F. Buckley Jr. and Norman Mailer . As such, and because he thought all men and women are potentially bisexual , Vidal rejected the adjectives "homosexual" and "heterosexual" when used as nouns, as inherently false terms used to classify and control people in society
[...More...]

"Gore Vidal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo