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Grade I Listed Building

A listed building, or listed structure, is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England in England, Historic Environment Scotland in Scotland, Cadw in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland. The term has also been used in Ireland, where buildings are surveyed for the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage in accordance with the country's obligations under the Granada Convention. However, the preferred term in Ireland is protected structure.[1] A listed building may not be demolished, extended, or altered without special permission from the local planning authority, which typically consults the relevant central government agency, particularly for significant alterations to the more notable listed buildings
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St Andrew's Church, Moretonhampstead
St Andrew's Church, Moretonhampstead is a Grade I listed parish church in the Church of England Diocese of Exeter in Moretonhampstead, Devon.[3] The church comprises an early 15th century tower, with a late 15th century nave and aisles. In 1856-57, the church was re-pewed. The north side was started in October 1856[4] and the south side completed shortly afterwards. The medieval chancel screen was reportedly in a poor condition and removed. A further restoration was carried out between 1904–05. The chancel was lengthened by 9 feet (2.7 m) to make room for an organ which was the gift of Mr Tilby of Teignmouth in memory of his wife. A stained glass window was added to the chancel in memory of William Henry Smith. A new chancel screen was erected to a similar design to that removed in 1856. All of the seating was replaced with oak pews. The wooden flooring in the aisles was replaced with Minton tiling
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Ipplepen

Ipplepen is a village and civil parish located within the Teignbridge district of the county of Devon in south-west England. A priory was located there. There is an electoral ward with the same name. The population at the 2011 census is 2,469.[1]

Ipplepen is situated about 3.7 miles (6 km) to the southwest of the market town of Newton Abbot. Ipplepen is also located just 5.6 miles (9 km) from the southern edge of Dartmoor and about 6.8 miles (11 km) to the northwest of Torquay. Other nearby villages include Torbryan, Broadhempston, Denbury, Marldon and Abbotskerswell. Ipplepen now has one public house ('The Wellington') and it is situated close to the heart of the village and alongside the main road. The village's second public house ('The Plough Inn') was closed in January 2009 and then put up for sale, it was adjacent to the Conservative Club
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Mamhead House
Mamhead House, Mamhead, Devon is a country house dating from 1827. Its origins are older but the present building was constructed for Robert William Newman, an Exeter merchant, in 1827-1833 by Anthony Salvin. The house is Grade I listed. The parkland has its own Grade II* Listing. It was for a time known as Dawlish College. The Mamhead estate is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as belonging to Ralph de Pomeroy.[1] It was owned by the Carew and Ball families, of which latter Thomas Ball (1671-1749) was a merchant who planted many exotic trees
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Moretonhampstead

The Domesday Book of 1086 records the manor as MORTONE.[7] This part of the name derives from the Old English for a farmstead in moorland, referring to the town's situation on the edge of Dartmoor. By 1493 "Hampstead" had been added to the name. This addition simply means "homestead", and The Oxford Names Companion (1991) speculates that this may be a family name, or a nearby place.[8] However The Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names (2004) simply says the reason for the addition is unknown.[9] The central region of Devon was occupied by the Saxons soon after 682 AD. It was divided into vast estates, and one of these divisions included all land within the boundaries of the rivers Teign and Bovey, with Moreton as its major settlement. The present parish of over 6,000 acres (24 km2) is the residue of that ancient royal estate
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Bradley (house)
Bradley is a medieval manor house in Newton Abbot, Devon, England. It is set amongst woodland and meadows in the valley of the River Lemon about a half mile to the west of the main town. The house is now in the ownership of the National Trust. Bradley is one of the smaller manor houses of the early fifteenth century, and has the advantage of having a contemporary chapel detached from the main house. The architect may have been influenced by Dartington Hall, some six miles to the south. Interesting features include the missing gatehouse, the interior of the chapel, the fenestration of the east front and the wall paintings.[1] The house is one of the most complete medieval manor houses in Devon. Much of it is the creation of Richard and Joan Yarde who owned it from 1402. Richard Yarde was Sheriff of Devon in 1442. On the walls of an upstairs room is preserved a late medieval pattern of stencilled black fleur-de-lys
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Haccombe With Combe

Haccombe with Combe is a civil parish in the Teignbridge Haccombe with Combe is a civil parish in the Teignbridge local government district of Devon, England. The parish lies immediately to the east of the town of Newton Abbot, and south of the estuary of the River Teign. Across the estuary are the parishes of Kingsteignton and Bishopsteignton. The parish is bordered on the east by Stokeinteignhead and on the south by Coffinswell.[1] Most of the southern boundary of the parish follows the minor ridge road that runs between the suburbs of Milber in Newton Abbot and Barton in Torquay and it bisects the Iron Age hill fort of Milber Down.[2] In 2001 the population of the parish was 729, much increased from 415 in 1901. The main settlement is the village of Combeinteignhead, with its parish church and public house, the Wild Goose Inn
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Newton Abbot

Newton Abbot is a market town and civil parish on the River Teign in the Teignbridge District of Devon, England, with a population of 25,556.[1] It grew rapidly in the Victorian era as the home of the South Devon Railway locomotive works. This later became a major steam engine shed, retained to service British Railways diesel locomotives until 1981. It now houses the Brunel industrial estate
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