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Geneticist
A geneticist is a biologist who studies genetics, the science of genes, heredity, and variation of organisms.[1] Description[edit] A geneticist can be employed as a scientist or lecturer.[1] Geneticists perform general research on genetic processes as well as development of genetic technologies to aid in the medicine and agriculture industries[1]. Some geneticists perform experiments in model organisms such as Drosophila, C. elegans, Zebrafish, rodents or Humans
Humans
and analyze data to interpret the inheritance of biological traits. A geneticist can be a scientist who has earned a Ph.D in Genetics
Genetics
or a physician (who has earned any of the following medical degrees: MBBS/MBChB (non-U.S.), D.O. (U.S.-only), or M.D.) who has been trained in genetics as a specialization
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Science Journalism
Science
Science
journalism conveys reporting about science to the public. The field typically involves interactions between scientists, journalists, and the public.Contents1 Aims 2 Status2.1 Chocolate hoax 2.2 Criticism3 Types 4 Notable science journalists 5 See also 6 References 7 External links 8 Further readingAims[edit] Science
Science
values detail, precision, the impersonal, the technical, the lasting, facts, numbers and being right. Journalism
Journalism
values brevity, approximation, the personal, the colloquial, the immediate, stories, words and being right now. There are going to be tensions. — Quentin Cooper, of BBC Radio 4’s Material World, [2]The aim of a science journalist is to render very detailed, specific, and often jargon-laden information produced by scientists into a form that non-scientists can understand and appreciate while still communicating the information accurately
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Pharmacogenomics
Pharmacogenomics
Pharmacogenomics
is the study of the role of the genome in drug response. Its name (pharmaco- + genomics) reflects its combining of pharmacology and genomics. Pharmacogenomics
Pharmacogenomics
analyzes how the genetic makeup of an individual affects his/her response to drugs.[1] It deals with the influence of acquired and inherited genetic variation on drug response in patients by correlating gene expression or single-nucleotide polymorphisms with pharmacokinetics (drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination) and pharmacodynamics (effects mediated through a drug's biological targets).[2][3][4] The term pharmacogenomics is often used interchangeably with pharmacogenetics
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Physics
Physics
Physics
(from Ancient Greek: φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), translit. physikḗ (epistḗmē), lit. 'knowledge of nature', from φύσις phýsis "nature"[1][2][3]) is the natural science that studies matter[4] and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force.[5] Physics
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Mathematics
Mathematics
Mathematics
(from Greek μάθημα máthēma, "knowledge, study, learning") is the study of such topics as quantity,[1] structure,[2] space,[1] and change.[3][4][5] It has no generally accepted definition.[6][7] Mathematicians seek out patterns[8][9] and use them to formulate new conjectures. Mathematicians resolve the truth or falsity of conjectures by mathematical proof. When mathematical structures are good models of real phenomena, then mathematical reasoning can provide insight or predictions about nature. Through the use of abstraction and logic, mathematics developed from counting, calculation, measurement, and the systematic study of the shapes and motions of physical objects. Practical mathematics has been a human activity from as far back as written records exist
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Agriculture
Agriculture
Agriculture
is the cultivation and breeding of animals and plants to provide food, fiber, medicinal plants and other products to sustain and enhance life.[1] Agriculture
Agriculture
was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities. The study of agriculture is known as agricultural science. The history of agriculture dates back thousands of years; people gathered wild grains at least 105,000 years ago, and began to plant them around 11,500 years ago, before they became domesticated. Pigs, sheep, and cattle were domesticated over 10,000 years ago. Crops originate from at least 11 regions of the world
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Wildlife
Wildlife
Wildlife
traditionally refers to undomesticated animal species, but has come to include all plants, fungi, and other organisms that grow or live wild in an area without being introduced by humans.[1] Wildlife
Wildlife
can be found in all ecosystems. Deserts, forests, rain forests, plains, grasslands and other areas including the most developed urban areas, all have distinct forms of wildlife. While the term in popular culture usually refers to animals that are untouched by human factors, most scientists agree that much wildlife is affected by human activities.[2] Humans have historically tended to separate civilization from wildlife in a number of ways including the legal, social, and moral sense. Some animals, however, have adapted to suburban environments. This includes such animals as domesticated cats, dogs, mice, and gerbils
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Research And Development
Research
Research
and development (R&D, R+D, or Rn'D), also known in Europe as research and technological development (RTD), refers to innovative activities undertaken by corporations or governments in developing new services or products, or improving existing services or products.[1] Research
Research
and development constitutes the first stage of development of a potential new service or the production process. R&D activities differ from institution to institution, with two primary models[1] of an R&D department either staffed by engineers and tasked with directly developing new products, or staffed with industrial scientists and tasked with applied research in scientific or technological fields, which may facilitate future product development
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Clinical Research
Clinical research is a branch of healthcare science that determines the safety and effectiveness (efficacy) of medications, devices, diagnostic products and treatment regimens intended for human use. These may be used for prevention, treatment, diagnosis or for relieving symptoms of a disease. Clinical research is different from clinical practice. In clinical practice established treatments are used, while in clinical research evidence is collected to establish a treatment.Contents1 Overview 2 Phases 3 Educational Resources 4 See also 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] The term "clinical research" refers to the entire bibliography of a drug/device/biologic, in fact any test article from its inception in the lab to its introduction to the consumer market and beyond
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Gene Therapy
In the medicine field, gene therapy (also called human gene transfer) is the therapeutic delivery of nucleic acid into a patient's cells as a drug to treat disease.[1] The first attempt at modifying human DNA was performed in 1980 by Martin Cline, but the first successful nuclear gene transfer in humans, approved by the National Institutes of Health, was performed in May 1989.[2] The first therapeutic use of gene transfer as well as the first direct insertion of human DNA
DNA
into the nuclear genome was performed by French Anderson in a trial starting in September 1990. Between 1989 and February 2016, over 2,300 clinical trials had been conducted, more than half of them in phase I.[3] Not all medical procedures that introduce alterations to a patient's genetic makeup can be considered gene therapy
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Molecular Ecology
[1] Molecular ecology is a field of evolutionary biology that is concerned with applying molecular population genetics, molecular phylogenetics, and more recently genomics to traditional ecological questions (e.g., species diagnosis, conservation and assessment of biodiversity, species-area relationships, and many questions in behavioral ecology). It is virtually synonymous with the field of "Ecological Genetics" as pioneered by Theodosius Dobzhansky, E. B. Ford, Godfrey M. Hewitt and others.[citation needed] These fields are united in their attempt to study genetic-based questions "out in the field" as opposed to the laboratory. Molecular ecology is related to the field of Conservation genetics. Methods frequently include using microsatellites to determine gene flow and hybridization between populations
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Biology
Biology
Biology
is the natural science that involves the study of life and living organisms, including their physical structure, chemical composition, function, development and evolution.[1] Modern biology is a vast field, composed of many branches. Despite the broad scope and the complexity of the science, there are certain unifying concepts that consolidate it into a single, coherent field. Biology
Biology
recognizes the cell as the basic unit of life, genes as the basic unit of heredity, and evolution as the engine that propels the creation of new species. Living organisms are open systems that survive by transforming energy and decreasing their local entropy[2] to maintain a stable and vital condition defined as homeostasis
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Animal Breeding
Animal breeding
Animal breeding
is a branch of animal science that addresses the evaluation (using best linear unbiased prediction and other methods) of the genetic value (estimated breeding value, EBV) of livestock. Selecting for breeding animals with superior EBV in growth rate, egg, meat, milk, or wool production, or with other desirable traits has revolutionized livestock production throughout the world
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Biotechnology
Biotechnology
Biotechnology
is the use of living systems and organisms to develop or make products, or "any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms, or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use" (UN Convention on Biological Diversity, Art. 2).[1] Depending on the tools and applications, it often overlaps with the (related) fields of bioengineering, biomedical engineering, biomanufacturing, molecular engineering, etc. For thousands of years, humankind has used biotechnology in agriculture, food production, and medicine.[2] The term is largely believed to have been coined in 1919 by Hungarian engineer Károly Ereky
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Proteomics
Proteomics
Proteomics
is the large-scale study of proteins.[1][2] Proteins are vital parts of living organisms, with many functions. The term proteomics was coined in 1997[3] in analogy with genomics, the study of the genome. The word proteome is a portmanteau of protein and genome, and was coined by Marc Wilkins in 1994 while he was a PhD student at Macquarie University.[4] Macquarie University
Macquarie University
also founded the first dedicated proteomics laboratory in 1995[5] (the Australian Proteome Analysis Facility – APAF).[6]. The proteome is the entire set of proteins that are produced or modified by an organism or system
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Microbial Genetics
Microbial genetics
Microbial genetics
is a subject area within microbiology and genetic engineering. It studies the genetics of very small (micro) organisms; bacteria, archaea, viruses and some protozoa and fungi.[1] This involves the study of the genotype of microbial species and also the expression system in the form of phenotypes. Since the discovery of microorganisms by Robert Hooke and Antoni van Leeuwenhoek during the period 1665-1885[2] they have been used to study many processes and have had applications in various areas of study in genetics
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