HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







France Location Map
In geography, location or place are used to denote a region (point, line, or area) on the earth's surface or elsewhere. The term location generally implies a higher degree of certainty than place, the latter often indicating an entity with an ambiguous boundary, relying more on human or social attributes of place identity and sense of place than on geometry. A locality, settlement, or populated place is likely to have a well-defined name but a boundary that is not well defined varies by context. London, for instance, has a legal boundary, but this is unlikely to completely match with general usage. An area within a town, such as Covent Garden in London, also almost always has some ambiguity as to its extent. In geography, location is considered to be more precise than "place".

Relative location

A relative location, or situation, is described as a displacement from another site
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Greenwich

Greenwich (/ˈɡrɛnɪ/ (listen) GREN-itch, /ˈɡrɪnɪ/ GRIN-ij, /ˈɡrɪnɪ/ GRIN-itch, or /ˈɡrɛnɪ/ GREN-ij[1][2]) is an area of South East London, England, centred 5.5 miles (8.9 km) east-southeast of Charing Cross. It is within the Royal Borough of Greenwich, to which it lends its name
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Natural Area Code
The Natural Area Code (or Universal Address) is a proprietary geocode system for identifying an area anywhere on the Earth, or a volume of space anywhere around the Earth. The use of thirty alphanumeric characters instead of only ten digits makes a NAC shorter than its numerical latitude/longitude equivalent. Instead of numerical longitudes and latitudes, a grid with 30 rows and 30 columns - each cell denoted by the numbers 0-9 and the twenty consonants of the Latin alphabet - is laid over the flattened globe. A NAC cell (or block) can be subdivided repeatedly into smaller NAC grids to yield an arbitrarily small area, subject to the ±1 m limitations of the World Geodetic System (WGS) data of 1984. A NAC represents an area on the earth—the longer the NAC, the smaller the area (and thereby, location) represented. A ten-character NAC can uniquely specify any building, house, or fixed object in the world
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Geopositioning
Geopositioning, also known as geotracking, geolocalization, geolocating, or geolocation (as a verb), is the process of identification or estimation of the geographic position (as a noun) of an object,[1][2][3][4][5][6] such as a radar source, mobile phone, or Internet-connected computer terminal
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Geographical Feature
Geographic features are features of the Earth, natural or not. Natural geographical features consist of landforms and ecosystems. For example, terrain types (physical factors of the environment) are natural geographical features. Conversely, human settlements or other engineered forms are considered types of artificial geographical features. Cartographic features are types of abstract geographical features, which appear on maps but not on the planet itself, even though they are located on the planet. For example, latitudes, latitudes, longitudes, the Equator, and the Prime Meridian are shown on maps of the Earth, but it do not physically exist
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Equator
Earth's Equator (spelled with capital E) is a specific case of a planetary equator. It is about 40,075 km (24,901 mi) long, of which 78.8% lies across water and 21.3% over land.[citation needed] In spatial (3D) geometry, as applied in astronomy, the equator of a rotating spheroid (such as a planet) is the parallel (circle of latitude) at which latitude is defined to be 0°. It is the imaginary line on the spheroid, equidistant from its poles, dividing it into northern and southern hemispheres
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]