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Eomyidae
†Apeomyinae †Eomyinae †Yoderimyinae Eomyidae
Eomyidae
is a family of extinct rodents from North America
North America
and Eurasia related to modern day pocket gophers and kangaroo rats
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Precambrian
The Precambrian
Precambrian
(or Pre-Cambrian, sometimes abbreviated pЄ, or Cryptozoic) is the earliest part of Earth's history, set before the current Phanerozoic
Phanerozoic
Eon. The Precambrian
Precambrian
is so named because it preceded the Cambrian, the first period of the Phanerozoic
Phanerozoic
eon, which is named after Cambria, the Latinised name for Wales, where rocks from this age were first studied. The Precambrian
Precambrian
accounts for 88% of the Earth's geologic time. The Precambrian
Precambrian
(colored green in the timeline figure) is a supereon that is subdivided into three eons (Hadean, Archean, Proterozoic) of the geologic time scale
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Late Miocene
The Late Miocene
Miocene
(also known as Upper Miocene) is a sub-epoch of the Miocene
Miocene
Epoch made up of two stages. The Tortonian and Messinian stages comprise the Late Miocene
Miocene
sub-epoch. The sub-epoch lasted from 11.608 ± 0.005 Ma (million years ago) to 5.332 ± 0.005 Ma. The Late Miocene
Miocene
Period was when the Australian and Central African species, respectively Thylacinus potens
Thylacinus potens
and Amphimachairodus
Amphimachairodus
kabir,[1] lived. References[edit]^ Peignéa, Stéphane; Louis de Bonisa; Andossa Likiusb; Hassane Taïsso Mackayeb; Patrick Vignauda; Michel Bruneta (2005). "A new machairodontine (Carnivora, Felidae) from the Late Miocene
Miocene
hominid locality of TM 266, Toros-Menalla, Chad". Comptes Rendus Palevol. 4 (3): 243–253. doi:10.1016/j.crpv.2004.10.002
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Extinct
In biology and ecology, extinction is the termination of an organism or of a group of organisms (taxon), normally a species. The moment of extinction is generally considered to be the death of the last individual of the species, although the capacity to breed and recover may have been lost before this point. Because a species' potential range may be very large, determining this moment is difficult, and is usually done retrospectively
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North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
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Eurasia
Eurasia
Eurasia
/jʊəˈreɪʒə/ is a combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia.[3][4][5] The term is a portmanteau of its constituent continents ( Europe
Europe
and Asia)
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Pocket Gopher
Cratogeomys Geomys Orthogeomys Pappogeomys Thomomys ZygogeomysPocket gophers, commonly referred to as gophers, are burrowing rodents of the family Geomyidae.[2] There are about 35 species, all endemic to North and Central America.[3] They are commonly known for their extensive tunneling activities. The name "pocket gopher" on its own may be used to refer to any of a number of genera within the family. These are the "true" gophers, but several ground squirrels in the distantly related family Sciuridae
Sciuridae
are often called gophers, as well. The origin of the word "gopher" is uncertain
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Heteromyidae
Dipodomyinae Heteromyinae Perognathinae Heteromyidae
Heteromyidae
is a family of rodents consisting of kangaroo rats, kangaroo mice, pocket mice and spiny pocket mice. Most heteromyids live in complex burrows within the deserts and grasslands of western North America, though species within the genus Heteromys
Heteromys
are also found in forests and their range extends down as far as northern South America. They feed mostly on seeds and other plant parts, which they carry in their fur-lined cheek pouches[1] to their burrows.[2] Although they are very different in physical appearance, the closest relatives of the heteromyids are pocket gophers in the family Geomyidae.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Behaviour 4 Ecology 5 Taxonomy 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] There are about fifty-nine members of the family Heteromyidae
Heteromyidae
divided among six genera
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Cambrian
The Cambrian
Cambrian
Period ( /ˈkæmbriən/ or /ˈkeɪmbriən/) was the first geological period of the Paleozoic
Paleozoic
Era, of the Phanerozoic
Phanerozoic
Eon.[6] The Cambrian
Cambrian
lasted 55.6 million years from the end of the preceding Ediacaran
Ediacaran
Period 541 million years ago (mya) to the beginning of the Ordovician
Ordovician
Period 485.4 mya.[7] Its subdivisions, and its base, are somewhat in flux
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Late Eocene
The Eocene
Eocene
( /ˈiːəˌsiːn, ˈiːoʊ-/[2][3]) Epoch, lasting from 56 to 33.9 million years ago, is a major division of the geologic timescale and the second epoch of the Paleogene Period in the Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era. The Eocene
Eocene
spans the time from the end of the Paleocene Epoch to the beginning of the Oligocene
Oligocene
Epoch. The start of the Eocene is marked by a brief period in which the concentration of the carbon isotope 13C in the atmosphere was exceptionally low in comparison with the more common isotope 12C. The end is set at a major extinction event called the Grande Coupure (the "Great Break" in continuity) or the Eocene– Oligocene
Oligocene
extinction event, which may be related to the impact of one or more large bolides in Siberia and in what is now Chesapeake Bay
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Herluf Winge
Adolf Herluf Winge (19 March 1857 – 10 November 1923) was a Danish zoologist. Biography[edit] As a young student, along with his brother Oluf, Winge was interested in small mammals, particularly moles, shrews and insectivora. He studied mammalian dentition and produced a comparison of cusp similarities. He worked at the Zoological Museum in the University of Copenhagen from 1885. A major work was his three volumes of E Museo Lundii on the extinct fauna of South America with 75 plates that he drew. He also studied the animal remains found in the kitchen-middens of Denmark.[1][2] Winge was described as a Lamarckist by some authors.[3] References[edit]^ Anon. (1923). "Obituary". Nature. 112 (2826): 946–947. Bibcode:1923Natur.112..946M. doi:10.1038/112946b0.  ^ Böving, AG (1924). "Herluf Winge, 1857–1923". Journal of Mammalogy. 5 (3): 196–199. doi:10.2307/1373288.  ^ Hansen, P (1902). Illustreret dansk Litteraturhistorie. Volume 3 (in Danish)
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Pleistocene
The Pleistocene
Pleistocene
( /ˈplaɪstəˌsiːn, -toʊ-/,[2] often colloquially referred to as the Ice Age) is the geological epoch which lasted from about 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago, spanning the world's most recent period of repeated glaciations
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Eutheria
Eutheria
Eutheria
(/juːˈθɪəriə/; from Greek εὐ-, eu- "good" or "right" and θηρίον, thēríon "beast" hence "true beasts") is one of two mammalian clades with extant members that diverged in the Early Cretaceous
Cretaceous
or perhaps the Late Jurassic. Except for the Virginia opossum, from North America, which is a metatherian, all post-Miocene mammals indigenous to Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America north of Mexico are eutherians. Extant eutherians, their last common ancestor, and all extinct descendants of that ancestor are members of Placentalia. Eutherians are distinguished from noneutherians by various phenotypic traits of the feet, ankles, jaws and teeth. All extant eutherians lack epipubic bones, which are present in all other living mammals (marsupials and monotremes)
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