HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Engine
An engine or motor is a machine designed to convert one form of energy into mechanical energy.[1][2] Heat
Heat
engines burn a fuel to create heat which is then used to do work. Electric motors convert electrical energy into mechanical motion; pneumatic motors use compressed air; and clockwork motors in wind-up toys use elastic energy
[...More...]

"Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oar
An oar is an implement used for water-borne propulsion. Oars have a flat blade at one end. Rowers grasp the oar at the other end. The difference between oars and paddles are that paddles are held by the paddler, and are not connected with the vessel. Oars generally are connected to the vessel by means of rowlocks or tholes which transmit the applied force to the boat. In this system (known as a second class lever)[1] the water is the fulcrum. Rowers generally face the stern of the vessel, reach towards the stern, and insert the blade of their oar in the water. As they lean back, towards the vessel's bow, the blade of their oars sweeps the water towards the stern, providing forward thrust – see lever. For thousands of years vessels were powered either by sails, or the mechanical work of rowers, or paddlers
[...More...]

"Oar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Elastic Energy
Elastic energy is the potential mechanical energy stored in the configuration of a material or physical system as work is performed to distort its volume or shape.[citation needed] Elastic energy occurs when objects are compressed and stretched, or generally deformed in any manner. Elasticity theory primarily develops formalisms for the mechanics of solid bodies and materials.[1] (Note however, the work done by a stretched rubber band is not an example of elastic energy. It is an example of entropic elasticity.) The elastic potential energy equation is used in calculations of positions of mechanical equilibrium. The energy is potential as it will be converted into the second form of energy, such as kinetic
[...More...]

"Elastic Energy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Battering Ram
A battering ram is a siege engine that originated in ancient times and designed to break open the masonry walls of fortifications or splinter their wooden gates. In its simplest form, a battering ram is just a large, heavy log carried by several people and propelled with force against an obstacle; the ram would be sufficient to damage the target if the log were massive enough and/or it were moved quickly enough (that is, if it had enough momentum). Later rams encased the log in an arrow-proof, fire-resistant canopy mounted on wheels. Inside the canopy, the log was swung from suspensory chains or ropes. Rams proved effective weapons of war because old fashioned wall-building materials such as stone and brick were weak in tension, and therefore prone to cracking when impacted with force. With repeated blows, the cracks would grow steadily until a hole was created
[...More...]

"Battering Ram" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Motor (other)
A motor is a mechanical or electrical device that creates motion. Motor
Motor
or Motors may also refer to: Motor
Motor
vehicle, a self-propelled road vehicle Mator or
[...More...]

"Motor (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Old French
Old French
Old French
(franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France
France
from the 8th century to the 14th century. In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc or Occitan language
Occitan language
in the south of France
[...More...]

"Old French" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chemical Energy
In chemistry, chemical energy is the potential of a chemical substance to undergo a transformation through a chemical reaction to transform other chemical substances. Examples include batteries, food, gasoline, and more. Breaking or making of chemical bonds involves energy, which may be either absorbed or evolved from a chemical system. A very common misconception is that energy is released when bonds are broken, whereas energy is required to break bonds. Energy
Energy
that can be released (or absorbed) because of a reaction between a set of chemical substances is equal to the difference between the energy content of the products and the reactants, if the initial and final temperatures are the same. This change in energy can be estimated from the bond energies of the various chemical bonds in the reactants and products
[...More...]

"Chemical Energy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Muscle
Muscle
Muscle
is a soft tissue found in most animals. Muscle
Muscle
cells contain protein filaments of actin and myosin that slide past one another, producing a contraction that changes both the length and the shape of the cell. Muscles function to produce force and motion. They are primarily responsible for maintaining and changing posture, locomotion, as well as movement of internal organs, such as the contraction of the heart and the movement of food through the digestive system via peristalsis. Muscle
Muscle
tissues are derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells in a process known as myogenesis. There are three types of muscle, skeletal or striated, cardiac, and smooth. Muscle
Muscle
action can be classified as being either voluntary or involuntary
[...More...]

"Muscle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Myosin
Myosins (/ˈmaɪəsɪn, -oʊ-/[1][2]) are a superfamily of motor proteins best known for their roles in muscle contraction and in a wide range of other motility processes in eukaryotes. They are ATP-dependent and responsible for actin-based motility. The term was originally used to describe a group of similar ATPases found in the cells of both striated muscle tissue and smooth muscle tissue.[3] Following the discovery by Pollard and Korn (1973) of enzymes with myosin-like function in Acanthamoeba
Acanthamoeba
castellanii, a global range of divergent myosin genes have been discovered throughout the realm of eukaryotes. Although myosin was originally thought to be restricted to muscle cells (hence myo-(s) + -in), there is no single "myosin"; rather it is a very large superfamily of genes whose protein products share the basic properties of actin binding, ATP hydrolysis ( ATPase
ATPase
enzyme activity), and force transduction
[...More...]

"Myosin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Siege Engine
A siege engine is a device that is designed to break or circumvent heavy castle doors, thick city walls and other fortifications in siege warfare. Some are immobile, constructed in place by sappers to attack enemy fortifications from a distance, while others have wheels to enable advancing up to the enemy fortification. There are many distinct types, such as siege towers to allow attacking soldiers to scale walls and attack the defenders, battering rams to break walls or gates, to catapults, ballistae, trebuchets and other similar constructions used to attack from a distance and fire a projectile; some complex siege engines were combinations of these types. Siege engines are fairly large constructions—from the size of a small house to a large building. From antiquity up to the development of gunpowder, they were made largely of wood, using rope or leather to help bind them, possibly with a few pieces of metal at key stress points
[...More...]

"Siege Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Energy
In physics, energy is the quantitative property that must be transferred to an object in order to perform work on, or to heat, the object.[note 1] Energy
Energy
is a conserved quantity; the law of conservation of energy states that energy can be converted in form, but not created or destroyed. The SI unit of energy is the joule, which is the energy transferred to an object by the work of moving it a distance of 1 metre against a force of 1 newton. Common forms of energy include the kinetic energy of a moving object, the potential energy stored by an object's position in a force field (gravitational, electric or magnetic), the elastic energy stored by stretching solid objects, the chemical energy released when a fuel burns, the radiant energy carried by light, and the thermal energy due to an object's temperature. Mass
Mass
and energy are closely related
[...More...]

"Energy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mace (bludgeon)
A mace is a blunt weapon, a type of club or virge that uses a heavy head on the end of a handle to deliver powerful blows. A mace typically consists of a strong, heavy, wooden or metal shaft, often reinforced with metal, featuring a head made of stone, copper, bronze, iron, or steel. The head of a military mace can be shaped with flanges or knobs to allow greater penetration of plate armour. The length of maces can vary considerably. The maces of foot soldiers were usually quite short (two or three feet, or seventy to ninety centimetres). The maces of cavalrymen were longer and thus better suited for blows delivered from horseback. Two-handed maces could be even larger. Maces are rarely used today for actual combat, but a large number of government bodies (for instance, the British House of Commons
British House of Commons
and the U.S. Congress), universities and other institutions have ceremonial maces and continue to display them as symbols of authority
[...More...]

"Mace (bludgeon)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fuel
A fuel is any material that can be made to react with other substances so that it releases energy as heat energy or to be used for work. The concept was originally applied solely to those materials capable of releasing chemical energy but has since also been applied to other sources of heat energy such as nuclear energy (via nuclear fission and nuclear fusion). The heat energy released by reactions of fuels is converted into mechanical energy via a heat engine. Other times the heat itself is valued for warmth, cooking, or industrial processes, as well as the illumination that comes with combustion. Fuels are also used in the cells of organisms in a process known as cellular respiration, where organic molecules are oxidized to release usable energy
[...More...]

"Fuel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Model Rocket Motor Classification
Motors for rockets[1] and high-powered rockets[2] (together, consumer rockets) are classified by total impulse into a set of letter-designated ranges, from ⅛A up to O. The total impulse is the integral of the thrust over burn time. P T = ∫ 0 t F t h r u s t ( t ′ ) d t ′ = F a v e t . displaystyle P_ T =int limits _ 0 ^ t F_ thrust (t^ prime )dt^ prime =F_ ave t
[...More...]

"Model Rocket Motor Classification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Compressed Air
Compressed air
Compressed air
is air kept under a pressure that is greater than atmospheric pressure. Compressed air
Compressed air
is an important medium for transfer of energy in industrial processes. Compressed air
Compressed air
is used for power tools such as air hammers, drills, wrenches and others. Compressed air
Compressed air
is used to atomize paint, to operate air cylinders for automation, and can also be used to propel vehicles. Brakes applied by compressed air made large railway trains safer and more efficient to operate. Compressed air
Compressed air
brakes are also found on large highway vehicles. Compressed air
Compressed air
is used as a breathing gas by underwater divers
[...More...]

"Compressed Air" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cotton Gin
A cotton gin is a machine that quickly and easily separates cotton fibers from their seeds, enabling much greater productivity than manual cotton separation.[1] The fibers are then processed into various cotton goods such as linens, while any undamaged cotton is used largely for textiles like clothing. Seeds may be used to grow more cotton or to produce cottonseed oil. Handheld roller gins had been used in the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
since at earliest AD 500 and then in other regions.[2] The Indian worm-gear roller gin, invented some time around the sixteenth century,[3] has, according to Lakwete, remained virtually unchanged up to the present time. A modern mechanical cotton gin was created by American inventor Eli Whitney
Eli Whitney
in 1793 and patented in 1794
[...More...]

"Cotton Gin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.