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Economy Of Equatorial Guinea
The economy of Equatorial Guinea has traditionally been dependent on commodities such as cocoa and coffee but is now heavily dependent on petroleum due to the discovery and exploitation of significant oil reserves in the 1980s.[11] Equatorial Guinea enjoys a purchasing power parity GDP per capita of more than US$38,699, which is the highest in Africa and the 31st highest in the world as of 2016. In 2017, it graduated from "Least Developed Country" status, the only Sub-Saharan African nation that managed to do so alongside Botswana. However, despite the economic growth and improving infrastructure, the country has been ranked only 138th out of 188 countries on the United Nations Human Development Index in 2015 and despite its impressive GNI figure, it is still plagued by extreme poverty because its Gini coefficient of 65.0 is the highest in the entire world
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Cocoa Bean

The cocoa bean or simply cocoa (/ˈk.k/), which is also called the cacao bean or cacao (/kəˈk/),[1] is the dried and fully fermented seed of Theobroma cacao, from which cocoa solids (a mixture of nonfat substances) and cocoa butter (the fat) can be extracted
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Italy

The automotive industry is a significant part of the Italian manufacturing sector, with over 144,000 firms and almost 485,000 employed people in 2015,[226] and a contribution of 8.5% to Italian GDP.[227] Fiat Chrysler Automobiles or FCA is currently the world's seventh-largest auto maker.[228] The country boasts a wide range of acclaimed products, from very compact city cars to luxury supercars such as Maserati, Lamborghini, and Ferrari, which was rated the world's most powerful brand by Brand Finance.[229] Italy is part of the European single market which represents more than 500 million consumers
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Brazil

Brazil is the largest national economy in Latin America, the world's ninth largest economy and the eighth largest in purchasing power parity (PPP) according to 2018 estimates. Brazil has a mixed economy with abundant natural resources. After rapid growth in preceding decades, the country entered an ongoing recession in 2014 amid a political corruption scandal and nationwide protests. Its Gross domestic product (PPP) per capita was $15,919 in 2017[261] putting Brazil in the 77th position according to IMF data
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List Of Countries By Public Debt
These are lists of countries by public debt, based on data from the CIA's World Factbook and the IMF. Net debt figure is the cumulative total of all government borrowings less repayments that are denominated in a country's home currency.[further explanation needed] Gross government debt is the total amount of debt the government has issued and is the most relevant data for discussions of government default and debt ceilings. It is different from external debt, which includes the foreign currency liabilities of non-government entities. Net debt subtracts financial assets a government holds from the gross debt amount. Net debt would decrease by about one-third of GDP. The public debt relative information provided by national sources (CIA) is not always objective and true, given the fact that there is no independent research in these matters
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Oil Reserves
Oil reserves denote the amount of crude oil that can be technically recovered at a cost that is financially feasible at the present price of oil.[1] Hence reserves will change with the price, unlike oil resources, which include all oil that can be technically recovered at any price. Reserves may be for a well, a reservoir, a field, a nation, or the world. Different classifications of reserves are related to their degree of certainty. The total estimated amount of oil in an oil reservoir, including both producible and non-producible oil, is called oil in place. However, because of reservoir characteristics and limitations in petroleum extraction technologies, only a fraction of this oil can be brought to the surface, and it is only this producible fraction that is considered to be reserves. The ratio of reserves to the total amount of oil in a particular reservoir is called the recovery factor
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Sub-Saharan Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa is, geographically and ethnoculturally, the area of the continent of Africa that lies south of the Sahara. According to the United Nations, it consists of all African countries and territories that are fully or partially south of the Sahara.[2] While the Sub-Saharan Africa is, geographically and ethnoculturally, the area of the continent of Africa that lies south of the Sahara. According to the United Nations, it consists of all African countries and territories that are fully or partially south of the Sahara.[2] While the United Nations geoscheme for Africa excludes Sudan from its definition of sub-Saharan Africa, the African Union's definition includes Sudan but instead excludes Mauritania. It contrasts with North Africa, whose countries are part of the League of Arab states within the Arab world
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Extreme Poverty

Extreme poverty, deep poverty, abject poverty, absolute poverty, destitution, or penury, is the most severe type of poverty, defined by the United Nations (UN) as "a condition characterized by severe deprivation of basic human needs, including food, safe drinking water, sanitation facilities, health, shelter, education and information. It depends not only on income but also on access to services" (UN 1995 report of the World Summit for Social Development)[3] Historically, other definitions have been proposed within the United Nations. In 2018, extreme poverty widely refers to an income below the international poverty line of $1.90 per day (in 2011 prices, equivalent to $2.16 in 2019), set by the World Bank
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