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Dutugamunu
Dutugamunu
Dutugamunu
(Sinhalese: දුටුගැමුණු, lit. 'දුටුගැමුණු', Tamil: துட்டகாமினி, lit. 'Tuṭṭakāmiṉi', also spelled as Dutthagamani, also known as Dutthagamani Abhaya "fearless Gamini"[1]), was a Sinhalese king of Sri Lanka[2] who reigned from 161 BC to 137 BC. He is renowned for defeating and overthrowing Ellalan, the usurping Tamil prince from the Chola Kingdom, who had invaded the Kingdom of Rajarata
Rajarata
in 205 BC
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Coronation
A coronation is the act of placement or bestowal of a crown upon a monarch's head. The term generally also refers not only to the physical crowning but to the whole ceremony wherein the act of crowning occurs, along with the presentation of other items of regalia, marking the formal investiture of a monarch with regal power. Aside from the crowning, a coronation ceremony may comprise many other rituals such as the taking of special vows by the monarch, the investing and presentation of regalia to the monarch, and acts of homage by the new ruler's subjects and the performance of other ritual deeds of special significance to the particular nation. Western-style coronations have often included anointing the monarch with holy oil, or chrism as it is often called; the anointing ritual's religious significance follows examples found in the Bible
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Indo-Greek
The Indo-Greek
Indo-Greek
Kingdoms or were partly Hellenistic
Hellenistic
kingdoms covering various parts of Afghanistan, and the northwest regions of the Indian subcontinent (parts of modern Pakistan
Pakistan
and northwestern India),[1][2][3][4][5][6] during the last two centuries BC and was ruled by more than thirty kings, often conflicting with one another. Euthydemus I
Euthydemus I
was, according to Polybius,[7] a Magnesian Greek. His son, Demetrius I, founder of the Indo-Greek
Indo-Greek
kingdom, was therefore of Greek ethnicity at least by his father
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Buddhist
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Chariots
A chariot is a type of carriage driven by a charioteer using primarily horses[a] to provide rapid motive power. Chariots were used by armies as transport or mobile archery platforms, for hunting or for racing, and as a conveniently fast way to travel for many ancient people. The word "chariot" comes from the Latin
Latin
term carrus, a loanword from Gaulish. A chariot of war or one used in military parades was called a car. In ancient Rome and some other ancient Mediterranean civilizations, a biga required two horses, a triga three, and a quadriga four. The horse chariot was a fast, light, open, two-wheeled conveyance drawn by two or more horses that were hitched side by side, and was little more than a floor with a waist-high guard at the front and sides
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Relic
In religion, a relic usually consists of the physical remains of a saint or the personal effects of the saint or venerated person preserved for purposes of veneration as a tangible memorial. Relics are an important aspect of some forms of Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Shamanism, and many other religions. Relic
Relic
derives from the Latin
Latin
reliquiae, meaning "remains", and a form of the Latin verb relinquere, to "leave behind, or abandon"
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Battle Of Vijithapura
The Battle of Vijithapura
Vijithapura
was a decisive and major battle in the campaign carried out by Sri Lankan king Dutthagamani
Dutthagamani
against the invading South Indian king Ellalan. The battle is documented in detail in the ancient chronicles of the country. However, they only provide the viewpoint of Dutthagamani
Dutthagamani
and his army, and details are scarce on Elara's side. After launching a campaign to regain the country from Elara, Dutthagamani
Dutthagamani
captured a number of his strongholds before coming to the fortified city of Vijithapura
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Vijithapura
Vijithapura (Sinhala: විජිතපුර, Tamil:விஜித நகரம்), also known as Vijitha Nagara or Vijithagama, was a fortress–city in ancient Sri Lanka. When Vijaya, the first recorded ruler of the country arrived from India, he brought a large retinue of his followers with him. These followers spread throughout the country, and established settlements. One of his chief followers named Vijitha founded the establishment which was then known as Vijitha Nagara (city of Vijitha) or Vijithagama (village of Vijitha).[1] The city is believed to have been founded during the reign of king Panduvasudeva, the third recorded king of Sri Lanka, who was the brother in law of the chieftain Vijitha.[2] The city is mentioned again in the chronicles Mahavamsa, Dipavamsa, Rajavaliya and Thupavamsa nearly 300 years later during the reign of king Dutthagamani
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Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha[note 3] (c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama,[note 4] Shakyamuni Buddha,[4][note 5] or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage,[4] on whose teachings Buddhism
Buddhism
was founded.[5] He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE.[6][note 6] Gautama taught a Middle Way
Middle Way
between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement[7] common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India
India
such as Magadha
Magadha
and Kosala.[6][8] Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism
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Alexandria Of The Caucasus
Alexandria
Alexandria
in the Caucasus (medieval Kapisa, modern Bagram) was a colony of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
(one of many colonies designated with the name Alexandria)
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Mahadharmaraksita
Mahadhammarakkhita (Sanskrit: Mahadharmaraksita, literally "Great protector of the Dharma") was a Greek (in Pali:"Yona", lit. "Ionian") Buddhist master, who lived during the 2nd century BCE during the reign of the Indo-Greek king Menander. In the Mahavamsa, a key Pali historical text, he is recorded as having travelled from “Alasandra” (thought to be Alexandria of the Caucasus, around 150 kilometers north of today's Kabul, or possibly Alexandria of the Arachosians), with 30,000 monks for the dedication ceremony of the Maha Thupa ("Great stupa") at Anuradhapura in Sri Lanka, when it was completed shortly after the death of the Sri Lankan king Dutthagamani Abhaya (r
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Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Kataragama Deviyo
Kataragama deviyo (also called: Skanda Kumara, Kartikeya, Sinhalese: කතරගම දෙවියෝ) is a guardian deity of Sri Lanka. A popular deity who is considered to be very powerful, shrines dedicated to Kataragama deviyo are found in many places of the country.[1] Sinhalese Buddhists believe him also as a divine patron of the Buddha Sasana in Sri Lanka.[2] An ancient temple dedicated to God Kataragama, known as Ruhunu Maha Kataragama Devalaya is situated in the South-Eastern town of Kataragama in Monaragala District of Uva Province. Today Ruhunu Maha Kataragama devalaya has become a temple which attracts and unites people of all religions and faiths.[3] Thousands of devotees from Sri Lanka and other parts of the world visit this temple daily.[4] Kataragama deviyo is identified with God Skanda of Hindu tradition, who is called as Murugan by the Tamil people. There is also an identical guardian deity of Mahayana Buddhism, known as Skanda
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Tangalle
Tangalle (Sinhala තංගල්ල [ˈtaŋɡalːə], Tamil: தங்கல்லை) (also known as Tangalla) is a large town in Hambantota District, Southern Province, Sri Lanka, governed by an Urban Council. It is one of the largest towns in southern province. It is located 195 km (121 mi) south of Colombo and 35 km (22 mi) east of Matara. It has a mild climate, in comparison to the rest of the district, and sandy beaches. Tangalle is a regionally important fishing port, situated on one of the largest bays in Sri Lanka, which is protected from the ocean by an enclosing reef.[1][2] It is a centre of tourism and a popular holiday destination on the south coast. In the town centre there is an old Dutch fort which is used as a prison today.[3][4] The Dutch and subsequently the British used Tangalle as an important anchorage on the southern coast of the island
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Kiri Vehera
Kiri Vehera is an ancient stupa situated in Kataragama, Sri Lanka. This stupa probably dates back to the 6th century BC and is believed to be built by King Mahasena, a regional ruler of Kataragama area.[1][2] One of the most popular Buddhist pilgrimage sites in the country, Kiri Vehera is among the Solosmasthana, the 16 most sacred Buddhist pilgrimage sites of ancient Sri Lanka. This stupa which is 95 ft. in height with a circumference of 280 ft. is located 800 m North to the famous Ruhunu Maha Kataragama Devalaya. Venerable Kobawaka Dhamminda Thera is the present Chief Prelate of Kirivehera Rajamaha Viharaya.[3] See also[edit]Kataragama deviyo Kataragama BodhiyaReferences and Notes[edit]^ "How God Skanda Helps the Faithful". Retrieved 2007-03-05.  ^ Amarasekara, Janani (13 January 2008). "Blessed Kataragama". Sunday Observer. Retrieved 29 December 2014.  ^ Ven
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Hiru TV
Hiru TV
Hiru TV
(Sinhala: හිරු ටීවී) is a television channel in Sri Lanka, owned by Asia Broadcasting Corporation. Hiru TV
Hiru TV
is Sri Lanka's first and only digital television channel which has the DVB-T2 pictures and stereo sounds.[2][3][4] It currently holds all island coverage
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