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Dumnonii
The Dumnonii
Dumnonii
or Dumnones were a British tribe who inhabited Dumnonia, the area now known as Devon
Devon
and Cornwall
Cornwall
(and some areas of present-day Dorset
Dorset
and Somerset) in the further parts of the South West peninsula of Britain, from at least the Iron Age
Iron Age
up to the early Saxon period
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Poleis
Polis
Polis
(/ˈpɒlɪs/; Greek: πόλις pronounced [pólis]), plural poleis (/ˈpɒleɪz/, πόλεις [póleːs]), literally means city in Greek. It can also mean a body of citizens. In modern historiography, polis is normally used to indicate the ancient Greek city-states, like Classical Athens
Classical Athens
and its contemporaries, and thus is often translated as "city-state". These cities consisted of a fortified city centre built on an acropolis or harbor and controlled surrounding territories of land (khôra). The Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
city-state developed during the Archaic period as the ancestor of city, state, and citizenship and persisted (though with decreasing influence) well into Roman times, when the equivalent Latin
Latin
word was civitas, also meaning "citizenhood", while municipium applied to a non-sovereign local entity
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Tristram Risdon
Tristram Risdon
Tristram Risdon
(c. 1580 – 1640) was an English antiquarian and topographer, and the author of Survey of the County of Devon. He was able to devote most of his life to writing this work. After he completed it in about 1632 it circulated around interested people in several manuscript copies for almost 80 years before it was first published by Curll in a very inferior form. A full version was not published until 1811. Risdon also collected information about genealogy and heraldry in a note-book; this was edited and published in 1897.Contents1 Biography 2 The Survey2.1 Publication3 The Note-Book 4 Notes 5 References 6 Sources 7 Further readingBiography[edit] Risdon was born at Winscott, in the parish of St Giles in the Wood, near Great Torrington
Great Torrington
in Devon, England
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Brythonic Languages
The Brittonic, Brythonic or British Celtic languages
Celtic languages
(Welsh: ieithoedd Brythonaidd/Prydeinig, Cornish: yethow brythonek/predennek, Breton: yezhoù predenek) form one of the two branches of the Insular Celtic language family; the other is Goidelic.[2] The name Brythonic was derived by Welsh Celticist John Rhys
John Rhys
from the Welsh word Brython, meaning an indigenous Briton as opposed to an Anglo-Saxon or Gael. The name Brittonic derives ultimately from the name Πρεττανική (Prettanike), recorded by Greek authors for the British Isles. The Brittonic languages
Brittonic languages
derive from the Common Brittonic
Common Brittonic
language, spoken throughout Great Britain
Great Britain
south of the Firth of Forth
Firth of Forth
during the Iron Age and Roman period
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Cornish Language
Cornish (Kernowek) is a revived language that became extinct as a first language in the late 18th century.[5][6] It is a Southwestern Brittonic Celtic language that was native to Cornwall
Cornwall
in south-west England. A revival began in the early 20th century. The language is considered to be an important part of Cornish identity, culture and heritage.[7][8] Cornish is currently a recognised minority language under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages.[9]. It has a growing number of second language speakers.[10] A few parents are inspired to create new first language speakers, by teaching their children the language from birth.[11][12][13][14] Along with Welsh and Breton, Cornish is descended directly from the Common Brittonic
Common Brittonic
language spoken throughout much of Britain before the English language
English language
came to dominate
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Amedée Simon Dominique Thierry
Amédée Simon Dominique Thierry (2 August 1797, Blois, Loir-et-Cher – 27 March 1873, Paris), French journalist and historian, was the younger brother of Augustin.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Amédée Thierry
Amédée Thierry
began life as a journalist (after an essay, like his brother, at schoolmastering). Connected with the romantic harbinger Globe, he obtained a small government clerkship. His first book was a brief history of Guienne
Guienne
in 1825, and three years later appeared the first volume of the Histoire des Gaulois, which was received with much favour, and obtained him, from the royalist premier Martignac, a history professorship at Besançon
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Southwestern Brythonic
The Southwestern Brittonic languages
Brittonic languages
are the Brittonic Celtic tongues spoken in South West England
South West England
and Brittany
Brittany
since the Early Middle Ages. During the period of their earliest attestation, the languages appear to be indistinguishable, but eventually they evolved into the Cornish and Breton languages. They evolved from the Common Brittonic
Common Brittonic
formerly spoken across most of Britain and were thus related to the Welsh and Cumbric
Cumbric
varieties spoken in Wales
Wales
and Hen Ogledd
Hen Ogledd
(northern Britain), respectively. The earliest stage of the languages, Primitive Cornish/Primitive Breton, is unattested. Written sources are extant from the Old Cornish/Breton period, roughly 800–1100, in which phase the languages are basically identical
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Breton Language
50-ABB-b (varieties: 50-ABB-ba to -be)Regional distribution of Breton speakers (2004)This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.Breton (/ˈbrɛtən/; brezhoneg [bʁeˈzõːnɛk] ( listen)[5] or [brəhõˈnek] in Morbihan) is a Southwestern Brittonic Celtic language spoken in Brittany. Breton was brought from Great Britain
Great Britain
to Armorica
Armorica
by migrating Britons during the Early Middle Ages; it is thus an Insular Celtic language, and as such not closely related to the Continental Celtic Gaulish language which had been spoken in pre-Roman Gaul
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Irish People
Irish Travellers, Anglo-Irish, Bretons, Cornish, English, Icelanders,[12] Manx, Norse, Scots, Ulster
Ulster
Scots, Welsh Other Northern European
Northern European
ethnic gro
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Déisi
The Déisi
Déisi
were a class of peoples in ancient and medieval Ireland. The term is Old Irish, and derives from the word déis, meaning "vassal" or "subject"; in its original sense, it designated groups who were vassals or rent-payers to a landowner.[1] Later, it became a proper name for certain septs and their own subjects throughout Ireland.[2] The various peoples listed under the heading déis shared the same status in Gaelic Ireland, and had little or no actual kinship, though they were often thought of as genetically related. Déisi
Déisi
groups included the Déisi Muman
Déisi Muman
(the Déisi
Déisi
of Munster), Déisi
Déisi
Temro (of Tara), Déisi
Déisi
Becc (located in the Kingdom of Mide) and the Déisi Tuisceart
Déisi Tuisceart
(the Northern Déisi; a sept of which would become famous as the Dál gCais)
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Ogham
Ogham
Ogham
(/ˈɒɡəm/;[1] Modern Irish [ˈoːmˠ] or [ˈoːəmˠ]; Old Irish: ogam [ˈɔɣamˠ]) is an Early Medieval
Early Medieval
alphabet used to write the early Irish language
Irish language
(in the "orthodox" inscriptions, 1st to 6th centuries AD), and later the Old Irish language (scholastic ogham, 6th to 9th centuries). There are roughly 400 surviving orthodox inscriptions on stone monuments throughout Ireland and western Britain; the bulk of which are in southern Munster.[2] The largest number outside Ireland are in Pembrokeshire, Wales.[3] The vast majority of the inscriptions consist of personal names. According to the High Medieval Bríatharogam, names of various trees can be ascribed to individual letters. The etymology of the word ogam or ogham remains unclear
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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South Hams
South Hams
South Hams
is a local government district on the south coast of Devon, England. It is administered partly by South Hams
South Hams
District Council, which has its headquarters in the town of Totnes, and partly by Devon County Council in the nearby city of Exeter. The area also contains the towns of Dartmouth, Kingsbridge, Salcombe
Salcombe
and Ivybridge, the last of which is the largest, with a population of 11,851. To the north, it includes part of Dartmoor
Dartmoor
National Park, to the east borders Torbay, and to the west Plymouth. It contains some of the most unspoilt coastline on the south coast, including the promontories of Start Point and Bolt Head
Bolt Head
The entire coastline, along with the lower Avon and Dart valleys, form most of the South Devon
Devon
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Connacht
Patron Saint: Ciarán of Clonmacnoise[3] a. ^ Connacht
Connacht
is part of the Midlands–North-West constituency; the five Connacht
Connacht
counties contain 32.7% of the population of this constituency.[4]Connacht[1] /ˈkɒnɔːxt/ or Connaught (Irish: Connacht[1] or Cúige Chonnacht) is one of the provinces of Ireland, situated in the west of the country. Up to the 9th century it consisted of several independent major kingdoms (Lúighne, Uí Maine, and Iarthar Connacht). Between the reigns of Conchobar mac Taidg Mór (died 882) and his descendant, Aedh mac Ruaidri Ó Conchobair (reigned 1228–33), it became a kingdom under the rule of the Uí Briúin
Uí Briúin
Aí dynasty, whose ruling sept adopted the surname Ua Conchobair
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Ravenna Cosmography
The Ravenna
Ravenna
Cosmography
Cosmography
(Latin: Ravennatis Anonymi Cosmographia, lit. "The Cosmography
Cosmography
of the Unknown Ravennese") is a list of place-names covering the world from India
India
to Ireland, compiled by an anonymous cleric in Ravenna
Ravenna
around AD 700. Textual evidence indicates that the author frequently used maps as his source.Contents1 The Text 2 See also 3 External links3.1 The Cosmographia 3.2 Sites dealing with the British section 3.3 Sites dealing with the Iberian section4 ReferencesThe Text[edit] The most recent critical edition of the three manuscripts is that of Joseph Schnetz in 1942.[1] The surviving texts are quite challenging. The three manuscript copies are distanced from the autograph (original manuscript) by three or four generations
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Sub-Roman Britain
Sub- Roman Britain
Roman Britain
is the transition period between the Roman Empire's Crisis of the Third Century
Crisis of the Third Century
around AD 235 (and the subsequent collapse and end of Roman Britain), until the start of the Early Medieval
Medieval
period. The term is derived from an archaeological label for the material culture of Great Britain
Great Britain
in Late Antiquity. The term Post- Roman Britain
Roman Britain
is also used for the period, mainly in non-archaeological contexts. The term "sub-Roman" was originally used to describe archaeological remains such as potsherds found in sites of the 5th and 6th centuries, and hinted at the decay of locally-made wares from a previous higher standard that had existed under the Roman Empire
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