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Dreambox
Dreambox
Dreambox
is a series of Linux-powered DVB satellite, terrestrial and cable digital television receivers (set-top boxes), produced by German multimedia vendor Dream Multimedia.Contents1 History and description 2 Dreambox
Dreambox
models2.1 Table 2.2 DM 7000 2.3 DM 5600, DM 5620 2.4 DM 500, DM 500+, DM500HD 2.5 DM 7020 2.6 DM 7025, DM 7025+ 2.7 DM 600 PVR 2.8 DM 800HD PVR / DM 800 HD se 2.9 DM 8000 HD PVR 2.10 "Project Goliath"3 Alternative firmware and plug-ins3.1 Plug-ins4 Clones 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory and description[edit] The Linux-based production software originally used by Dreambox
Dreambox
was originally developed for DBox2, by the Tuxbox project. The Dbox2 was a proprietary design distributed by KirchMedia for their pay TV services. The bankruptcy of KirchMedia flooded the market with unsold boxes available for Linux
Linux
enthusiasts
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Joint Test Action Group
JTAG
JTAG
(named after the Joint Test Action Group
Joint Test Action Group
which codified it) is an industry standard for verifying designs and testing printed circuit boards after manufacture. JTAG
JTAG
implements standards for on-chip instrumentation in electronic design automation (EDA) as a complementary tool to digital simulation.[1] It specifies the use of a dedicated debug port implementing a serial communications interface for low-overhead access without requiring direct external access to the system address and data buses. The interface connects to an on-chip test access port (TAP) that implements a stateful protocol to access a set of test registers that present chip logic levels and device capabilities of various parts. The Joint Test Action Group
Joint Test Action Group
formed in 1985 to develop a method of verifying designs and testing printed circuit boards after manufacture
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SCART
Status & Aspect Ratio up[c]0–2 V → off +5–8 V → on/16:9 +9.5–12 V → on/4:3Pin 9RGB Green ground (pin 11 ground)Pin 10Clock / Data 2[d] Control bus (AV.link)Pin 11RGB Green up Component Y up[b]Pin 12Reserved / Data 1[d]Pin 13RGB Red ground (pin 15 ground)Pin 14Usually Data signal ground (pins 8, 10 & 12 ground)Pin 15RGB Red up S- Video
Video
C up Component PR up[b]Pin 16Blanking signal up RGB-selection voltage up0–0.4 V → composite 1–3 V → R
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Common Interface
In Digital Video Broadcasting, the Common Interface (also called DVB-CI) is a technology which allows decryption of pay TV channels. Pay TV stations want to choose which encryption method to use. The Common Interface allows TV manufacturers to support many different pay TV stations, by allowing to plug in exchangeable CAM modules for various encryption schemes. The Common Interface is the connection between the TV tuner (TV or set-top box) and the module (CAM) that decrypts the TV signal. The CAM module, in turn, then accepts the pay-to-view subscriber card, which contains the access keys and permissions. The host (TV or set-top box) is responsible for tuning to pay TV channels and demodulation of the RF signal, while CAM is responsible for CA descrambling. The Common Interface allows them to communicate with each other. All Common Interface equipment must comply with the EN 50221-1997 standard
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CompactFlash
CompactFlash
CompactFlash
(CF) is a flash memory mass storage device used mainly in portable electronic devices. The format was specified and the devices were first manufactured by SanDisk
SanDisk
in 1994.[4] CompactFlash
CompactFlash
became the most successful of the early memory card formats, surpassing Miniature Card
Miniature Card
and SmartMedia. Subsequent formats, such as MMC/SD, various Memory Stick
Memory Stick
formats, and xD-Picture Card offered stiff competition. Most of these cards are smaller than CompactFlash
CompactFlash
while offering comparable capacity and speed
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Smart Card
A smart card, chip card, or integrated circuit card (ICC), is any pocket-sized card that has embedded integrated circuits.[1] Smart cards are made of plastic, generally polyvinyl chloride, but sometimes polyethylene-terephthalate-based polyesters, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene or polycarbonate. Since April 2009, a Japanese company has manufactured reusable financial smart cards made from paper.[2] Smart cards can be contact, contactless, or both
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Universal Serial Bus
USB, short for Universal Serial Bus, is an industry standard that was developed to define cables, connectors and protocols for connection, communication, and power supply between personal computers and their peripheral devices. [3] USB
USB
was designed to standardize the connection of computer peripherals (including keyboards, pointing devices, digital cameras, printers, portable media players, disk drives and network adapters) to personal computers, both to communicate and to supply electric power. It has largely replaced interfaces such as serial ports and parallel ports, and has become commonplace on a wide range of devices
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RS232
In telecommunications, RS-232, Recommended Standard 232[1] is a standard introduced in 1960[2] for serial communication transmission of data. It formally defines the signals connecting between a DTE (data terminal equipment) such as a computer terminal, and a DCE (data circuit-terminating equipment or data communication equipment), such as a modem. The RS-232
RS-232
standard had been commonly used in computer serial ports. The standard defines the electrical characteristics and timing of signals, the meaning of signals, and the physical size and pinout of connectors
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Local Area Network
A local area network (LAN) is a computer network that interconnects computers within a limited area such as a residence, school, laboratory, university campus or office building.[1] By contrast, a wide area network (WAN) not only covers a larger geographic distance, but also generally involves leased telecommunication circuits. Ethernet
Ethernet
and Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
are the two most common technologies in use for local area networks. Historical technologies include ARCNET, Token ring, and AppleTalk.Contents1 History 2 Cabling 3 Wireless media 4 Technical aspects 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The increasing demand and use of computers in universities and research labs in the late 1960s generated the need to provide high-speed interconnections between computer systems
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Hard Disk Drive
A hard disk drive (HDD), hard disk, hard drive or fixed disk[b] is a data storage device that uses magnetic storage to store and retrieve digital information using one or more rigid rapidly rotating disks (platters) coated with magnetic material. The platters are paired with magnetic heads, usually arranged on a moving actuator arm, which read and write data to the platter surfaces.[2] Data is accessed in a random-access manner, meaning that individual blocks of data can be stored or retrieved in any order and not only sequentially. HDDs are a type of non-volatile storage, retaining stored data even when powered off.[3][4][5] Introduced by IBM
IBM
in 1956,[6] HDDs became the dominant secondary storage device for general-purpose computers by the early 1960s. Continuously improved, HDDs have maintained this position into the modern era of servers and personal computers
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ESATA
Serial ATA
Serial ATA
(SATA, abbreviated from Serial AT Attachment)[2] is a computer bus interface that connects host bus adapters to mass storage devices such as hard disk drives, optical drives, and solid-state drives. Serial ATA
Serial ATA
succeeded the older Parallel ATA
Parallel ATA
(PATA) standard,[a] offering several advantages over the older interface: reduced cable size and cost (seven conductors instead of 40 or 80), native hot swapping, faster data transfer through higher signaling rates, and more efficient transfer through an (optional) I/O
I/O
queuing protocol
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AT Attachment
Parallel ATA
Parallel ATA
(PATA), originally AT Attachment, is an interface standard for the connection of storage devices such as hard disk drives, floppy disk drives, and optical disc drives in computers. The standard is maintained by the X3/ INCITS committee.[1] It uses the underlying AT Attachment (ATA) and AT Attachment Packet Interface (ATAPI) standards. The Parallel ATA
Parallel ATA
standard is the result of a long history of incremental technical development, which began with the original AT Attachment interface, developed for use in early PC AT
PC AT
equipment. The ATA interface itself evolved in several stages from Western Digital's original Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) interface. As a result, many near-synonyms for ATA/ATAPI and its previous incarnations are still in common informal use, in particular Extended IDE (EIDE) and Ultra ATA (UATA)
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RF Connector
A coaxial R F connector
F connector
(radio frequency connector) is an electrical connector designed to work at radio frequencies in the multi-megahertz range. RF connectors are typically used with coaxial cables and are designed to maintain the shielding that the coaxial design offers. Better models also minimize the change in transmission line impedance at the connection. Mechanically, they may provide a fastening mechanism (thread, bayonet, braces, blind mate) and springs for a low ohmic electric contact while sparing the gold surface, thus allowing very high mating cycles and reducing the insertion force
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HDMI
HDMI
HDMI
(High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is a proprietary audio/video interface for transmitting uncompressed video data and compressed or uncompressed digital audio data from an HDMI-compliant source device, such as a display controller, to a compatible computer monitor, video projector, digital television, or digital audio device.[4] HDMI
HDMI
is a digital replacement for analog video standards. HDMI
HDMI
implements the EIA/ CEA-861 standards, which define video formats and waveforms, transport of compressed, uncompressed, and LPCM audio, auxiliary data, and implementations of the VESA EDID.[5][6](p. III) CEA-861 signals carried by HDMI
HDMI
are electrically compatible with the CEA-861 signals used by the digital visual interface (DVI)
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RISC
A reduced instruction set computer, or RISC (pronounced 'risk', /ɹɪsk/), is one whose instruction set architecture (ISA) allows it to have fewer cycles per instruction (CPI) than a complex instruction set computer (CISC).[1] Various suggestions have been made regarding a precise definition of RISC, but the general concept is that such a computer has a small set of simple and general instructions, rather than a large set of complex and specialized instructions. Another common RISC trait is their load/store architecture,[2] in which memory is accessed through specific instructions rather than as a part of most instructions. Although a number of computers from the 1960s and '70s have been identified as forerunners of RISCs, the modern concept dates to the 1980s
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HDCP
High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) is a form of digital copy protection developed by Intel
Intel
Corporation[1] to prevent copying of digital audio & video content as it travels across connections. Types of connections include DisplayPort
DisplayPort
(DP), Digital Visual Interface (DVI), and High-Definition Multimedia Interface
High-Definition Multimedia Interface
(HDMI), as well as less popular or now deprecated protocols like Gigabit Video Interface (GVIF) and Unified Display Interface (UDI). The system is meant to stop HDCP-encrypted content from being played on unauthorized devices or devices which have been modified to copy HDCP content.[2][3] Before sending data, a transmitting device checks that the receiver is authorized to receive it
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