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Dornford Yates
Dornford Yates
Dornford Yates
was the pseudonym of the English novelist, Cecil William Mercer (7 August 1885 – 5 March 1960), whose novels and short stories, some humorous (the Berry books), some thrillers (the Chandos books), were best-sellers in the 21-year interwar period between the First and Second world wars. The pen name, Dornford Yates, first in print in 1910, resulted from combining the surnames of his grandmothers – the paternal Eliza Mary Dornford, and the maternal Harriet Yates.Contents1 Early life 2 The Great War and afterwards 3 French residence 4 The Second World War
Second World War
and the Rhodesian years 5 Writings 6 Bibliography 7 Stage, cinema, and other media 8 Related Works 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit] William (Bill) Mercer was born in Walmer, Kent, the son of Cecil John Mercer (1850–1921) and Helen Wall (1858–1918)
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Law Degree
A law degree is an academic degree conferred for studies in law. Such degrees are generally preparation for legal careers; but while their curricula may be reviewed by legal authority, they do not themselves confer a license. A legal license is granted (typically by examination) and exercised locally; while the law degree can have local, international, and world-wide aspects- e.g., in Britain the Legal Practice Course is required to become a British solicitor[1][2] or the Bar Professional Training Course
Bar Professional Training Course
(BPTC) to become a barrister.[3]Contents1 History 2 Types of degrees 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first academic degrees were all law degrees-and the first law degrees were doctorates
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Canterbury
Canterbury
Canterbury
(/ˈkæntərbri/ ( listen), /-bəri/, or /-bɛri/)[3] is a historic English cathedral city and UNESCO World Heritage Site, which lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a local government district of Kent, England. It lies on the River Stour. The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
is the primate of the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion
owing to the importance of St Augustine, who served as the apostle to the pagan Kingdom of Kent around the turn of the 7th century. The city's cathedral became a major focus of pilgrimage following the 1170 martyrdom of Thomas Becket, although it had already been a well-trodden pilgrim destination since the murder of St Alphege
Alphege
by the men of King Canute in 1012
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Hampshire
Hampshire
Hampshire
(/ˈhæmpʃər/, /-ʃɪər/ ( listen); abbreviated Hants)[a] is a county on the southern coast of England
England
in the United Kingdom. The county town of Hampshire
Hampshire
is Winchester, the former capital city of England.[1] Hampshire
Hampshire
is the most populous ceremonial county in the United Kingdom (excluding the metropolitan counties). Its the two largest settlements, Southampton
Southampton
and Portsmouth, are administered separately as unitary authorities. The rest of the area forms the administrative county, which is governed by Hampshire
Hampshire
County Council
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Departments Of France
(including overseas)Departments (including overseas)ArrondissementsCantonsIntercommunality Métropole Communauté urbaine Communauté d'agglomération Communauté de communesCommunes Associated communes Municipal arrondissementsOthers in Overseas France Overseas collectivities Sui generis collectivity Overseas country Overseas territory Clipperton IslandIn the administrative divisions of France, the department (French: département, pronounced [depaʁt(ə)mɑ̃]) is one of the three levels of government below the national level ("territorial collectivities"), between the administrative regions and the commune. There are 96 departments in metropolitan France, and 5 overseas departments, which are also classified as regions
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Pyrenees
The Pyrenees
Pyrenees
(/ˈpɪrɪniːz/; Spanish: Pirineos [piɾiˈneos], French: Pyrénées [piʁene], Aragonese: Pirineus, Catalan: Pirineus [piɾiˈnɛus], Occitan: Pirenèus, Basque: Pirinioak [piˈɾinioˌak]) is a range of mountains in southwest Europe
Europe
that forms a natural border between Spain
Spain
and France. Reaching a height of 3,404 metres (11,168 ft) altitude at the peak of Aneto, the range separates the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
from the rest of continental Europe, and extends for about 491 km (305 mi) from the Bay of Biscay (Cap Higuer) to the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
(Cap de Creus). For the most part, the main crest forms a divide between Spain
Spain
and France, with the microstate of Andorra
Andorra
sandwiched in between
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Bar (law)
In law, the bar is the legal profession as an institution. The term is a metonym for the line (or "bar") that separates the parts of a courtroom reserved for spectators and those reserved for participants in a trial such as lawyers.Contents1 Courtroom
Courtroom
division 2 License and certification2.1 U.S
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Marylebone
Marylebone
Marylebone
(/ˈmærɪləbən/ or /ˈmærələbən/[1], both appropriate for the Parish Church of St. Marylebone, /ˈmærɪbən/, /ˈmɑːrlɪbən/, or /ˈmærɪlɪboʊn/[2]) is an affluent inner-city area of central London, England, located within the City of Westminster
Westminster
and part of the West End
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Old Stagers
The Old Stagers (OS) is an amateur theatre group, founded in 1842 by Hon. Frederick Ponsonby (later Earl of Bessborough) to perform during Kent's annual Canterbury Cricket Week.[1] Originally the Canterbury Old Stagers, it took its current name in 1851.[2] It claims to be the oldest surviving amateur dramatic company in the world, having staged its first shows in Canterbury in 1842.[3][4] It has continued to give annual performances every year since (with intermissions for the two World Wars).[4] It now stages its plays at the Gulbenkian Theatre in Canterbury. The Old Stagers has close links to Kent County Cricket Club and the I Zingari nomadic amateur cricket club. Ponsonby was also a founder of I Zingari, and later became president of Surrey County Cricket Club
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Daily Mirror
Labour Left-WingHeadquarters One Canada Square, London, United KingdomCirculation 587,803 Daily (as of November 2017)[1] OCLC
OCLC
number 223228477Website www.mirror.co.ukThe Daily Mirror
Daily Mirror
is a British national daily tabloid newspaper founded in 1903. It is owned by parent company Trinity Mirror. From 1985 to 1987, and from 1997 to 2002, the title on its masthead was simply The Mirror. It had an average daily print circulation of 716,923 in December 2016, dropping markedly to 587,803 the following year.[2] Its Sunday sister paper is the Sunday Mirror
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Kismet (musical)
Kismet is a musical with lyrics and musical adaptation (as well as some original music) by Robert Wright and George Forrest, adapted from the music of Alexander Borodin, and a book by Charles Lederer
Charles Lederer
and Luther Davis, based on Kismet, the 1911 play by Edward Knoblock. The story concerns a wily poet who talks his way out of trouble several times; meanwhile, his beautiful daughter meets and falls in love with the young Caliph. The musical was first produced on Broadway in 1953 and won the Tony Award for best musical in 1954. It was also successful in London's West End and has been given several revivals
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Punch (magazine)
Punch; or, The London
London
Charivari was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire established in 1841 by Henry Mayhew
Henry Mayhew
and engraver Ebenezer Landells. Historically, it was most influential in the 1840s and 1850s, when it helped to coin the term "cartoon" in its modern sense as a humorous illustration. After the 1940s, when its circulation peaked, it went into a long decline, closing in 1992. It was revived in 1996, but closed again in 2002.Contents1 History 2 Later years2.1 Punch table3 Gallery of selected early covers 4 Contributors4.1 Editors 4.2 Cartoonists 4.3 Authors5 Influence 6 See also 7 Notes 8 Works cited 9 External linksHistory[edit] Punch was founded on 17 July 1841 by Henry Mayhew
Henry Mayhew
and engraver Ebenezer Landells, on an initial investment of £25. It was jointly edited by Mayhew and Mark Lemon
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St James's, Spanish Place
St James' Church, is a large English gothic Roman Catholic church in George Street, Marylebone, London. Although currently situated in George Street, the church maintains its connection with Spanish Place, the road opposite the current church, because of its historic connection with the Spanish Embassy. It is grade II* listed with Historic England.[1]Contents1 Site 2 History 3 Architecture 4 Liturgy 5 Organ 6 Transport connections 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksSite[edit] The church is located in George Street, Marylebone, behind the Wallace Collection and close to Marylebone
Marylebone
High Street.[2] History[edit]Cross of St. James, badge of the Order of Santiago.In the reign of Elizabeth I the Bishops of Ely let their palace and chapel in Ely Place
Ely Place
to the Spanish Ambassador and, until the reign of Charles I, it was occupied by the High Representative of the Court of Spain
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St John's Wood
St John's Wood
St John's Wood
is a district of north-west London, in the City of Westminster
Westminster
and Camden[1], and on the north-west side of Regent's Park
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War Office
The War Office[1] was a department of the British Government responsible for the administration of the British Army
British Army
between 1857 and 1964, when its functions were transferred to the Ministry of Defence. Until 1855 a number of independent offices and individuals were responsible for various aspects of Army administration. The three most important were the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, the Secretary at War and the Secretary of State for War
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Edward VII Of The United Kingdom
Edward VII
Edward VII
(Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions
British Dominions
and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death in 1910. The eldest son of Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Edward was related to royalty throughout Europe. Before his accession to the throne, he was heir apparent and held the title of Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
for longer than any of his predecessors. During the long reign of his mother, he was largely excluded from political power, and came to personify the fashionable, leisured elite. He travelled throughout Britain performing ceremonial public duties, and represented Britain on visits abroad
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