HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Demosthenes
Demosthenes
Demosthenes
(/dɪˈmɒs.θəniːz/; Greek: Δημοσθένης Dēmosthénēs; Attic Greek: [dɛːmosˈtʰenɛːs]; 384 – 12 October 322 BC) was a Greek statesman and orator of ancient Athens. His orations constitute a significant expression of contemporary Athenian intellectual prowess and provide an insight into the politics and culture of ancient Greece during the 4th century BC. Demosthenes
Demosthenes
learned rhetoric by studying the speeches of previous great orators. He delivered his first judicial speeches at the age of 20, in which he argued effectively to gain from his guardians what was left of his inheritance
[...More...]

"Demosthenes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Constantine Paparrigopoulos
Constantine Paparrigopoulos
Constantine Paparrigopoulos
(Greek: Κωνσταντίνος Παπαρρηγόπουλος; 1815 – 14 April 1891) was a Greek historian, who is considered the founder of modern Greek historiography. He is the founder of the concept of historical continuity of Greece
Greece
from antiquity to the present, establishing the tripartite division of Greek history in ancient, medieval and modern, and sought to set aside the prevailing views at the time that the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
was a period of decadence and degeneration, not recognized as part of Greek history. Paparrigopoulos introduced this division in his teaching at the University of Athens
[...More...]

"Constantine Paparrigopoulos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quintilian
Marcus Fabius Quintilianus (c. 35 – c. 100 AD) was a Roman rhetorician from Hispania, widely referred to in medieval schools of rhetoric and in Renaissance
Renaissance
writing. In English translation, he is usually referred to as Quintilian
Quintilian
(/kwɪnˈtɪliən/), although the alternate spellings of Quintillian and Quinctilian are occasionally seen, the latter in older texts.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Institutio Oratoria 4 Placement of Quintilian's rhetoric 5 Influence of Quintilian 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksLife[edit] Quintilian
Quintilian
was born c. 35 in Calagurris (Calahorra, La Rioja) in Hispania. His father, a well-educated man, sent him to Rome
Rome
to study rhetoric early in the reign of Nero. While there, he cultivated a relationship with Domitius Afer, who died in 59
[...More...]

"Quintilian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

British Museum
5,906,716 (2017)[2]Ranked 1st nationallyChairman Sir Richard LambertDirector Hartwig FischerPublic transit access Goodge Street; Holborn; Tottenham Court Road; Russell Square;Website britishmuseum.orgArea 807,000 sq ft (75,000 m2) in 94 GalleriesThe centre of the museum was redeveloped in 2001 to become the Great Court, surrounding the original Reading Room.The British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture
[...More...]

"British Museum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aristarchus Of Samothrace
Aristarchus of Samothrace
Aristarchus of Samothrace
(Greek: Ἀρίσταρχος ὁ Σαμόθραξ; c. 220 – c. 143 BC) was a grammarian noted as the most influential of all scholars of Homeric poetry. He was the librarian of the library of Alexandria
Alexandria
and seems to have succeeded his teacher Aristophanes of Byzantium in that role. He left Samothrace island at a young age and went to Alexandria
Alexandria
where he studied with the director of the library. Later at first he was a teacher at the Royal courtyard and then director of the library from 153 to 145 BC
[...More...]

"Aristarchus Of Samothrace" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Aristophanes Of Byzantium
Aristophanes of Byzantium
Byzantium
(Greek: Ἀριστοφάνης ὁ Βυζάντιος; c. 257 – c. 185/180 BC) was a Hellenistic Greek scholar, critic and grammarian, particularly renowned for his work in Homeric scholarship, but also for work on other classical authors such as Pindar
Pindar
and Hesiod. Born in Byzantium about 257 BC, he soon moved to Alexandria
Alexandria
and studied under Zenodotus, Callimachus, and Dionysius Iambus
[...More...]

"Aristophanes Of Byzantium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Olympiad
An Olympiad
Olympiad
(Greek: Ὀλυμπιάς, Olympiás) is a period of four years associated with the Olympic Games
Olympic Games
of the Ancient Greeks. During the Hellenistic period, beginning with Ephorus, it was used as a calendar epoch. Converting to the modern BC/AD dating system the first Olympiad
Olympiad
began in the summer of 776 BC and lasted until the summer of 772 BC, when the second Olympiad
Olympiad
would begin with the commencement of the next games. By extrapolation to the Gregorian calendar, the 2nd year of the 699th Olympiad
Olympiad
begins in (Northern-Hemisphere) mid-summer 2018. A modern Olympiad
Olympiad
refers to a four-year period beginning on the opening of the Olympic Games
Olympic Games
for the summer sports
[...More...]

"Olympiad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bust (sculpture)
A bust is a sculpted or cast representation of the upper part of the human figure, depicting a person's head and neck, and a variable portion of the chest and shoulders. The piece is normally supported by a plinth. These forms recreate the likeness of an individual. These may be of any medium used for sculpture, such as marble, bronze, terracotta or wood. A parallel term, aust, is a representation of the upper part of an animal or mythical creature. Sculptural portrait heads from classical antiquity are sometimes displayed as busts. However, these are often fragments from full-body statues, or were created to be inserted into an existing body; these portrait heads are not included in this article.Contents1 Pictorial timeline 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksPictorial timeline[edit] Pericles with the Corinthian helmet
Pericles with the Corinthian helmet
(marble, Roman after a Greek original, c
[...More...]

"Bust (sculpture)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Deme
In Ancient Greece, a deme or demos (Greek: δῆμος) was a suburb of Athens or a subdivision of Attica, the region of Greece
Greece
surrounding Athens. Demes as simple subdivisions of land in the countryside seem to have existed in the 6th century BC and earlier, but did not acquire particular significance until the reforms of Cleisthenes
Cleisthenes
in 508 BC. In those reforms, enrollment in the citizen-lists of a deme became the requirement for citizenship; prior to that time, citizenship had been based on membership in a phratry, or family group. At this same time, demes were established in the city of Athens itself, where they had not previously existed; in all, at the end of Cleisthenes' reforms, Attica
Attica
was divided into 139 demes[1] to which one should add Berenikidai, established in 224/223 BC, Apollonieis (201/200 BC) and Antinoeis (126/127)
[...More...]

"Deme" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lawsuit
A lawsuit (or suit in law[a]) is "a vernacular term for a suit, action, or cause instituted or depending between two private persons in the courts of law."[1] A lawsuit is any proceeding by a party or parties against another in a court of law.[2] Sometimes, the term "lawsuit" is in reference to a civil action brought in a court of law in which a plaintiff, a party who claims to have incurred loss as a result of a defendant's actions, demands a legal or equitable remedy. The defendant is required to respond to the plaintiff's complaint. If the plaintiff is successful, judgment is in the plaintiff's favor, and a variety of court orders may be issued to enforce a right, award damages, or impose a temporary or permanent injunction to prevent an act or compel an act. A declaratory judgment may be issued to prevent future legal disputes. A lawsuit may involve dispute resolution of private law issues between individuals, business entities or non-profit organizations
[...More...]

"Lawsuit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Speech Impediment
Speech disorders or speech impediments are a type of communication disorder where 'normal' speech is disrupted. This can mean stuttering, lisps, etc. Someone who is unable to speak due to a speech disorder is considered mute.[1]Contents1 Classification1.1 Types of disorder2 Causes 3 Treatment 4 Social effects 5 Language disorders 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksClassification[edit] Classifying speech into normal and disordered is more problematic than it first seems
[...More...]

"Speech Impediment" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Attic Talent
The Attic talent
Attic talent
(a talent of the Attic standard), also known as the Athenian talent or Greek talent (Greek: τάλαντον, talanton), is an ancient unit of mass equal to 26 kg, as well as a unit of value equal to this amount of pure silver.[1] A talent was originally intended to be the mass of water required to fill an amphora (one cubic foot) [2] At the 2017 price of $547/kg, a silver talent is worth $14,113.[3] It was equivalent to 60 minae, 6,000 drachmae or 36,000 oboloi.[1] During the Peloponnesian War, a trireme crew of 200 rowers was paid a talent for a month's worth of work, one drachma, or 4.3 grams of silver per rower per day.[4] According to wage rates from 377 BC, a talent was the value of nine man-years of skilled work.[5] This corresponds to 2340 work days or 11.1 grams of silver per worker per workday
[...More...]

"Attic Talent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Politics
Politics
Politics
(from Greek: πολιτικά, translit. Politiká, meaning "affairs of the cities") is the process of making decisions that apply to members of a group.[1] It refers to achieving and exercising positions of governance—organized control over a human community, particularly a state.[2] In modern nation states, people have formed political parties to represent their ideas. They agree to take the same position on many issues, and agree to support the same changes to law and the same leaders.[3] An election is usually a competition between different parties.[4] Some examples of political parties are the African National Congress (ANC) in South Africa, the Tories
Tories
in Great Britain
Great Britain
and the Indian National Congress. Politics
Politics
is a multifaceted word
[...More...]

"Politics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Plataea
Plataea
Plataea
(/pləˈtiːə/) or Plataeae (/pləˈtiːiː/; Ancient Greek: Πλάταια or Πλαταιαί) was an ancient city, located in Greece
Greece
in southeastern Boeotia, south of Thebes.[1] It was the location of the Battle of Plataea
Battle of Plataea
in 479 BC, in which an alliance of Greek city-states defeated the Persians. Plataea
Plataea
was destroyed in the Peloponnesian War
Peloponnesian War
by Thebes and Sparta
Sparta
in 427 BC and rebuilt in 386 BC
[...More...]

"Plataea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Friedrich Nietzsche
Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
Nietzsche
(/ˈniːtʃə/[6] or /ˈniːtʃi/;[7] German: [ˈfʁiːdʁɪç ˈvɪlhɛlm ˈniːtʃə] ( listen); 15 October 1844 – 25 August 1900) was a German philosopher, cultural critic, composer, poet, philologist, and Latin
Latin
and Greek scholar whose work has exerted a profound influence on Western philosophy and modern intellectual history.[8][9][10][11] He began his career as a classical philologist before turning to philosophy
[...More...]

"Friedrich Nietzsche" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Louvre
8.1 million (2017)Ranked 1st nationally Ranked 1st globallyDirector Jean-Luc MartinezCurator Marie-Laure de RochebrunePublic transit accessPalais Royal – Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
Louvre-Rivoli Website www.louvre.frThe Louvre
Louvre
(US: /ˈluːv(rə)/),[1] or the Louvre
Louvre
Museum (French: Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
[myze dy luvʁ] ( listen)), is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine
Seine
in the city's 1st arrondissement (district or ward)
[...More...]

"Louvre" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.