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Damnonii
The Damnonii
Damnonii
(also referred to as Damnii) were a Brittonic people of the late 2nd century who lived in what became the Kingdom of Strathclyde by the Early Middle Ages, and is now southern Scotland. They are mentioned briefly in Ptolemy's Geography, where he uses both of the terms "Damnonii" and "Damnii" to describe them, and there is no other historical record of them, except arguably by Gildas
Gildas
three centuries later.[1] Their cultural and linguistic affinity is presumed to be Brythonic. However, there is no unbroken historical record, and a partly Pictish origin is not precluded. The Romans under Agricola had campaigned in the area in 81, and it was Roman-occupied (at least nominally) between the time that Hadrian's Wall was built (c. 122), through the building of the Antonine Wall
Antonine Wall
(c. 142), until the pullback to Hadrian's Wall
Hadrian's Wall
in 164
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Inchkeith
Forth Ports[8] [9] Inchkeith
Inchkeith
(from the Scottish Gaelic: Innis Cheith) is an island in the Firth of Forth, Scotland, administratively part of the Fife
Fife
council area. Inchkeith
Inchkeith
has had a colourful history as a result of its proximity to Edinburgh
Edinburgh
and strategic location for use as home for a lighthouse and for military purposes defending the Firth of Forth
Firth of Forth
from attack from shipping, and more recently protecting the upstream Forth Bridge
Forth Bridge
and Rosyth Dockyard
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Glasgow
Glasgow
Glasgow
(/ˈɡlɑːzɡoʊ, ˈɡlɑːs-, ˈɡlæz-, ˈɡlæs-/;[6][7] Scots: Glesga /ˈɡlezɡə/; Scottish Gaelic: Glaschu [ˈkl̪ˠas̪əxu]) is the largest city in Scotland, and third most populous in the United Kingdom. Historically part of Lanarkshire, the city now forms the Glasgow
Glasgow
City council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland; the local authority is Glasgow
Glasgow
City Council. Glasgow
Glasgow
is situated on the River Clyde
River Clyde
in the country's West Central Lowlands. Inhabitants of the city are referred to as "Glaswegians" or "Weegies". It is the fourth most visited city in the UK. Glasgow
Glasgow
grew from a small rural settlement on the River Clyde
River Clyde
to become the largest seaport in Britain
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Stirling
Stirling
Stirling
(/ˈstɜːrlɪŋ/; Scots: Stirlin; Scottish Gaelic: Sruighlea [ˈs̪t̪ruʝlə]) is a city in central Scotland. The market town, surrounded by rich farmland, grew up connecting the royal citadel, the medieval old town with its merchants and tradesmen,[3] the bridge and the port. Located on the River Forth, Stirling
Stirling
is the administrative centre for the Stirling
Stirling
council area, and is traditionally the county town of Stirlingshire. Proverbially it is the strategically important "Gateway to the Highlands". It has been said that "Stirling, like a huge brooch clasps Highlands and Lowlands together".[4][5] Similarly "he who holds Stirling, holds Scotland" is often quoted
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Allan Water
The Allan Water (Scottish Gaelic: Uisge Alain) is a river in central Scotland. Rising in the Ochil Hills, it runs through Strathallan to Dunblane and Bridge of Allan before joining the River Forth. It is liable to cause floods in lower Bridge of Allan.[1] It shares its name with a tributary of the River Teviot. The name is similar to the Ale Water in Berwickshire, the River Alness in Ross-shire, the Allander Water in Stirlingshire, the River Alne and the Ayle Burn in Northumberland, the River Ellen in Cumbria, and several names in the south of England, Wales and Cornwall.[2] Ptolemy, who wrote his Geography about 150 AD, gave the names of some of these rivers as Alauna or Alaunos.[3] Ekwall says that Alauna or Alaunos are British [i.e. Brythonic or P-Celtic] river names.[4] Nicolaisen says that the name Allan is of Pre-Celtic Indo-European origin. Its original form was Alauna, from the Indo-European root *el-/ol-, meaning "to flow, to stream"
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Britons (Celtic People)
The Britons, also known as Celtic Britons
Celtic Britons
or Ancient Britons, were Celtic people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the British Iron Age into the Middle Ages, at which point their culture and language diverged into the modern Welsh, Cornish and Bretons
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Lanark
Lanark
Lanark
(/ˈlænərk/; Scottish Gaelic: Lannraig,[2] Scots: Lanrik)[3] is a small town in the central belt of Scotland. The name is believed to come from the Cumbric
Cumbric
Lanerc meaning "clear space, glade".[4] Lanark
Lanark
is traditionally the county town of Lanarkshire, though there are several larger towns in the county. Lanark railway station
Lanark railway station
and coach station have frequent services to Glasgow. There is little industry in Lanark
Lanark
and some residents commute to work in Glasgow
Glasgow
and Edinburgh. Its shops serve the local agricultural community and surrounding villages
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Carstairs
Carstairs (/kɑːrˈstɛərz/, Scottish Gaelic: Caisteal Tarrais) is a village in South Lanarkshire, Scotland. Carstairs is located 5 miles (8 km) east of the county town of Lanark and the West Coast Main Line runs through the village. The village is served by Carstairs railway station, which is served by the Caledonian Sleeper to and from London Euston. Carstairs is best known as the location of the State Hospital. Carstairs is applied to the places Carstairs Village and the village of Carstairs Junction where the railway station is situated. The two places are two completely different villages divided by 1 mile (2 km) of land, a parkland area (Monteith Park) and the railway line. Carstairs Village has massively expanded since 2007 with the building of Millwood Estate.Contents1 History 2 Transport 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] A Roman fort was built at Castledyke in the first and second century AD
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Peebles
Peebles (Scottish Gaelic: Na Pùballan)[1] is a royal burgh in Peeblesshire, of which it is the county town, within the Scottish Borders region. According to the 2011 Census, the population was 8,376.[2]Contents1 History 2 Location 3 Historic features and traditions 4 Coat of arms 5 Notable people 6 Facilities 7 Twin town 8 Surnames 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit] Initially a market town, Peebles played a role in the woollen industry of the Borders during the 19th and early 20th Century.[3] Most mills closed by the 1960s, although the last one remained open until 2015.[4] The composition of Peebles has now changed; the town is home to many people who commute to work in Edinburgh, as well as being a popular tourist destination, especially in the summer
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Kirkintilloch
Kirkintilloch
Kirkintilloch
(/ˌkɜːrkɪnˈtɪləx/; Scottish Gaelic: Cair Cheann Tulaich)[3][4] is a town and former royal burgh in East Dunbartonshire, Scotland. It lies on the Forth and Clyde Canal
Forth and Clyde Canal
and on the south side of Strathkelvin, about 8 miles (13 km) northeast of central Glasgow
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Linlithgow
Linlithgow
Linlithgow
(/lɪnˈlɪθɡoʊ/; Scottish Gaelic: Gleann Iucha, Scots: Lithgae) is a town in West Lothian, Scotland. It is West Lothian's county town, reflected in the county's alternative name of Linlithgowshire. An ancient town, it lies south of its two most prominent landmarks: Linlithgow Palace
Linlithgow Palace
and Linlithgow
Linlithgow
Loch, and north of the Union Canal. Linlithgow's patron saint is Saint Michael
Saint Michael
and its motto is St. Michael is kinde to straingers
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Camelon
Camelon
Camelon
(/ˈkeɪmələn/; Scots: Caimlan, Scottish Gaelic: Camlann)[2] is a large settlement within the Falkirk
Falkirk
council area, Scotland. The village is in the Forth Valley, 1.3 miles (2.1 km) west of Falkirk, 1.3 miles (2.1 km) south of Larbert
Larbert
and 2.6 miles (4.2 km) east of Bonnybridge. The main road through Camelon
Camelon
is the A803 road
A803 road
which links the village to Falkirk
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Crieff
Crieff
Crieff
(/kriːf/ ( listen); Scottish Gaelic: Craoibh, meaning "tree") is a market town in Perth and Kinross, Scotland. It lies on the A85 road
A85 road
between Perth and Crianlarich, and the A822 between Greenloaning
Greenloaning
and Aberfeldy. The A822 joins the A823, which leads to Dunfermline. Crieff
Crieff
has become a hub for tourism, famous for its whisky and history of cattle droving. Attractions include the Caithness Glass Visitor Centre and Glenturret Distillery. The nearby Innerpeffray Library
Innerpeffray Library
(founded about 1680), is Scotland's oldest lending library. St Mary's Chapel, adjacent to the library, dates from 1508
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Abernethy, Perth And Kinross
Kinross
Kinross
(Gaelic: Ceann Rois) is a burgh in Perth and Kinross, Scotland. It is the traditional county town of the historic county of Kinross-shire.Contents1 Location and transport 2 Tourism 3 Population 4 Sport and recreation 5 Notable people 6 Twinned Cities 7 Schools 8 References 9 External linksLocation and transport[edit] The site of the original parish church and churchyard are located down a small wynd overlooking Loch
Loch
Leven, a little away from the town.A map of Kinross
Kinross
from 1945 Kinross
Kinross
was originally linked by railway to Perthshire, Fife
Fife
and Clackmannanshire
Clackmannanshire
until the rail links gradually disappeared. At one time three independent railway companies had their termini at the town
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Perth, Scotland
Perth
Perth
(/ˈpɜːrθ/ ( listen); Scottish Gaelic: Peairt [ˈpʰɛuɾt̪])[4] is a city in central Scotland, located on the banks of the River Tay. It is the administrative centre of Perth
Perth
and Kinross
Kinross
council area and the historic county of Perthshire. It has a population of about 47,180.[5] Perth
Perth
has been known as The Fair City since the publication of the story Fair Maid of Perth
Fair Maid of Perth
by Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott
Sir Walter Scott
in 1828. During the later medieval period the city was also called St John's Toun or Saint Johnstoun by its inhabitants in reference to the main church dedicated to St John the Baptist
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Paisley, Renfrewshire
Paisley (/ˈpeɪzli/; Scottish Gaelic: Pàislig [ˈpʰaːʃʎikʲ]) is the largest town in the historic county of Renfrewshire
Renfrewshire
in the west central Lowlands of Scotland
Scotland
and serves as the administrative centre for the Renfrewshire
Renfrewshire
council area. The town is situated on the northern edge of the Gleniffer Braes, straddling the banks of the White Cart Water, a tributary of the River Clyde. The town came to prominence with the establishment of Paisley Abbey
Paisley Abbey
in the 12th century, an important religious hub which formerly had control over the other churches in the local area. It is often cited as "Scotland's largest town", as it does not have city status. By the 19th century, Paisley had established itself as a centre of the weaving industry, giving its name to the Paisley shawl
Paisley shawl
and the Paisley Pattern
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