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Coulis
A coulis (/kˈl/ koo-LEE) is a form of thin sauce made from puréed and strained vegetables or fruits. A vegetable coulis is commonly used on meat and vegetable dishes, and it can also be used as a base for soups or other sauces. Fruit coulis are most often used on desserts
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Mukimono
Mukimono (剥き物) is the traditional Japanese art of decorative garnishing. Examples of this include carving traditional images (flowers, cranes, turtles and dragons[1]) into skins of fruit and vegetables, as well as carving vegetables (such as daikon, carrot, eggplant) into attractive shapes such as flowers, twists, and fan shapes. These are commonly served as a garnish on the same plate as the meal, or on a small side plate. Carving is done using a kitchen knife. Mukimono is different from the Thai fruit carving that uses a sharp thin knife specifically designed for this purpose.[2] Cutting food in Mukimono style is a way to create a sense of the four seasons
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Duxelles
Duxelles (French: [dyksɛl]) is a finely chopped (minced) mixture of mushrooms or mushroom stems, onions or shallots, herbs such as thyme or parsley, and black pepper, sautéed in butter and reduced to a paste. Cream is sometimes used as well, and some recipes add a dash of madeira or sherry. It is a basic preparation used in stuffings and sauces (notably, Beef Wellington) or as a garnish.[1][2] Duxelles can also be filled into a pocket of raw pastry and baked as a savory tart.[3] Duxelles is made with any cultivated or wild mushroom, depending on the recipe
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Fried Onion
Fried onions are slices of onions that are either pan fried (sautéed) or deep fried[1] — and consumed as a popular snack food, garnish,[2] or vegetable accompaniment to various recipes. Common fried onions are cooked by basic pan frying or sautéing of sliced onions. This produces a fairly soft cooked onion, which may brown some from a Maillard reaction, depending on the length of cooking and the temperature. The Philadelphia cheesesteak is a hot sandwich commonly served with sautéed onions, and they are half of the dish called liver and onions. In the Middle East, mujaddara is a dish made of lentils and rice topped with fried onions. In Indian cuisine, fried onions are one of the key ingredients for the rice dish called biryani.
French fried onions
If the much higher temperature, immersive, deep frying is used, this prepares the onions in a manner similar to that of French fried potatoes
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Gremolata
Gremolata (Italian pronunciation: [ɡremoˈlaːta]) or gremolada (IPA: [ɡremoˈlaːda]) is a green sauce made of chopped parsley, lemon zest, and garlic. It is the standard accompaniment to the Milanese braised veal shank dish ossobuco alla milanese.[1] Gremolata is also used as a garnish.[2] Gremolata usually includes grated lemon peel, although the zest from other citrus fruits (lime, orange, grapefruit, etc.) may be used
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Microgreen
Microgreens are vegetable greens (not to be confused with sprouts or shoots) harvested just after the cotyledon leaves have developed (and possibly, with one set of true leaves). They are used as a nutrition supplement, a visual enhancement, and a flavor and texture enhancement. Microgreens can add sweetness and spiciness to foods. Microgreens are smaller than “baby greens” because they are consumed very soon after sprouting, rather than after the plant has matured to produce multiple leaves. Among upscale grocers, they are now considered a specialty genre of greens, good for garnishing salads, soups, sandwiches, and plates.[1][2] Edible young greens are produced from various kinds of vegetables, herbs, or other plants. They range in size from 1 to 3 inches (2.5 to 7.6 cm), including the stem and leaves. The stem is cut just above the soil line during harvesting
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Nori
Nori (海苔) is the Japanese name for edible seaweed (a "sea vegetable") species of the red algae genus Pyropia, including P. yezoensis and P. tenera. It has a strong and distinctive flavor. It is used chiefly in Japanese cuisine as an ingredient to wrap rolls of sushi or onigiri, in which case the term refers to the dried sheets. The finished dried sheets are made by a shredding and rack-drying process that resembles papermaking. They are sold in packs in grocery stores for culinary purposes
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Persillade
Persillade (French pronunciation: ​[pɛʁsijad]) is a sauce or seasoning mixture of parsley (French: persil) chopped together with seasonings including garlic, herbs, oil, and vinegar.[1] In its simplest form, just parsley and garlic, it is a common ingredient in many dishes, part of a sauté cook's mise en place. If added early in cooking, it becomes mellow, but when it is added at the end of cooking or as a garnish,[2] it provides a garlicky jolt. It is extensively used in French and French-influenced cuisines, as well as in Cajun, Louisiana Creole, and Québécois cuisines
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Maraschino Cherry

The name maraschino originates from the Marasca cherry of Croatian origin[4] and the maraschino liqueur made from it, in which Marasca cherries were crushed and preserved after being pickled.[5] Whole cherries preserved in this liqueur were known as "maraschino cherries".[6] This had been a local means of preserving the fruit in Dalmatia.[5] In the 19th century, these became popular in the rest of Europe, but the supply in Dalmatia was too small for the whole continent, so they came to be seen as a delicacy for royalty and the wealthy. Because of the relative scarcity of the Marasca, other cherries came to be preserved in various ways and sold as "maraschino".

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