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Corporation
A corporation is a company or group of people authorized to act as a single entity (legally a person) and recognized as such in law. Early incorporated entities were established by charter (i.e. by an ad hoc act granted by a monarch or passed by a parliament or legislature). Most jurisdictions now allow the creation of new corporations through registration
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Holding Company
A holding company is a company that owns other companies' outstanding stock. A holding company usually does not produce goods or services itself; rather, its purpose is to own shares of other companies to form a corporate group. Holding companies allow the reduction of risk for the owners and can allow the ownership and control of a number of different companies. In the United States, 80% of stock, in voting and value, must be owned before tax consolidation benefits such as tax-free dividends can be claimed.[1] That is, if Company A owns 80% or more of the stock of Company B, Company A will not pay taxes on dividends paid by Company B to its stockholders, as the payment of dividends from B to A is essentially transferring cash from one company to the other
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Cayman Islands Company Law
Cayman Islands
Cayman Islands
company law is primarily codified in the Companies Law (2016 Revision) and the Limited Liability Companies Law, 2016,[1] and to a lesser extent in the Securities and Investment Business Law (2015 Revision). The Cayman Islands
Cayman Islands
is a leading Offshore Financial Centre, and financial services forms a significant part of the economy of the Cayman Islands
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Anguillan Company Law
Anguillan company law is primarily codified in three principal statutes:the International Business Companies Act (Cap I.20);[1] the Companies Act (Cap C.65); and the Limited Liability Companies Act (Cap L.65).The Companies Act is generally reserved for companies which engaged in business physically in Anguilla, and companies formed under it are generally referred to as either "CACs" (an acronym for Companies Act Companies) or "ABCs" (an acronym for Anguillan Business Company)
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British Virgin Islands Company Law
British Virgin Islands
British Virgin Islands
company law is primarily codified in the BVI Business Companies Act, 2004, and to a lesser extent by the Insolvency Act, 2003 and the Securities and Investment Business Act, 2010. The British Virgin Islands
British Virgin Islands
has approximately 30 registered companies per head of population, which is probably the highest ratio of any country in the world. Annual company registration fees provide a significant part of Government revenue in the British Virgin Islands, which accounts for the comparative lack of other taxation
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Public Limited Company
A public limited company (legally abbreviated to plc) is a type of public company under the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
company law, some Commonwealth jurisdictions, and the Republic of Ireland. It is a limited liability company whose shares may be freely sold and traded to the public (although a plc may also be privately held, often by another plc), with a minimum share capital of £50,000 and usually with the letters PLC after its name.[1] Similar companies in the United States are called publicly traded companies. Public limited companies will also have a separate legal identity. A PLC can be either an unlisted or listed company on the stock exchanges. In the United Kingdom, a public limited company usually must include the words "public limited company" or the abbreviation "PLC" or "plc" at the end and as part of the legal company name
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European Corporate Law
European corporate law
European corporate law
is a part of European Union
European Union
law, which concerns the formation, operation and insolvency of corporations in the European Union. There is no substantive European company law as such, although a host of minimum standards are applicable to companies throughout the European Union. All member states continue to operate separate companies acts, which are amended from time to time to comply with EU Directives and Regulations
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Societas Cooperativa Europaea
The European Cooperative
Cooperative
Society (SCE, for Latin
Latin
societas cooperativa Europaea) is, in company law, a European co-operative type of company, established in 2006 and related to the European Company. European Cooperative
Cooperative
Societies may be established, and may operate, throughout the European Economic Area
European Economic Area
(including the European Community). The legal form was created to remove the need for co-operatives to establish a subsidiary in each Member State in which they operate, and to allow them to move their registered office and head office freely from one Member State to another, keeping their legal identity and without having to register or wind up any legal persons
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Societas Privata Europaea
A European Private Company
Company
(Latin: societas privata Europaea, SPE) is a legal form for a limited liability company that is being proposed by the European Commission
European Commission
to be introduced across the European Union. It forms a company of limited liability, similar to the English limited company, the Austrian or the German GmbH, the Dutch BV, the Belgian BVBA
BVBA
or the French SARL
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Industrial And Provident Society
An industrial and provident society (IPS) was a legal entity for a trading business or voluntary organisation in the United Kingdom, the Republic of Ireland, and New Zealand. The name is still used in New Zealand,[1] the Republic of Ireland[2] and within the UK in Northern Ireland.[3] Recent legal developments in Great Britain
Great Britain
include the Co-operative and Community Benefit Societies Act 2014, which has renamed these societies as co-operative or community benefit societies. From 1 August 2014 a new society has had to register as either a co-operative or a community benefit society rather than, as was the case previously, a society that meets either requirement
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Societas Unius Personae
A societas unius personae (SUP; single-person company) is a legal form for a single-member private limited liability company proposed by the European Commission. See also[edit]European corporate lawSocietas Europaea Societas cooperativa Europaea Societas privata EuropaeaExternal links[edit]2014 Memo by the Commissionv t e European corporate forms Societas Europaea
Societas Europaea
(SE) Societas privata Europa
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Sole Proprietorship
A sole proprietorship, also known as the sole trader or simply a proprietorship, is a type of enterprise that is owned and run by one natural person and in which there is no legal distinction between the owner and the business entity. The owner is in direct control of all elements and is legally accountable for the finances of such business and this may include debts, loans, loss, etc. The sole trader receives all profits (subject to taxation specific to the business) and has unlimited responsibility for all losses and debts. Every asset of the business is owned by the proprietor and all debts of the business are the proprietor's. It is a "sole" proprietorship in contrast with partnerships (which have at least two owners). A sole proprietor may use a trade name or business name other than his, her, or its legal name
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French Company Law
French company law
French company law
is the law governing corporations incorporated in France
France
or under French corporate law. History[edit] In the wake of the French Revolution
French Revolution
in 1791, the right to free registration for all private companies was proclaimed. There was a boom in registrations, but this was followed by a bust in 1793. The law was reversed until 1796 when the principle of free incorporation was established again. The law was consolidated in Napoleon's Code de commerce of 1807 using a concession system. While previously public companies with special privileges were created by a special act of the state, the Code allowed the companies to be formed according to general company law rules. Specific state permission was still required
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Charitable Incorporated Organisation
A charitable incorporated organisation (CIO) is a new form of legal entity designed for non-profit organisations in the United Kingdom. The main intended benefits of the new entity are that it has legal personality, the ability to conduct business in its own name, and limited liability so that its members and trustees will not have to contribute in the event of financial loss. These are already available to limited companies; charities can be formed as companies, but then they must be registered with both Companies House
Companies House
and the Charity Commission. In contrast, the CIO only needs to register with the Charity Commission. This is expected to reduce bureaucracy for the charity.[1] The CIO status became available to charities in England and Wales on 4 March 2013
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Low-profit Limited Liability Company
A low-profit limited liability company (L3C) is a legal form of business entity in the United States
United States
that was created to bridge the gap between non-profit and for-profit investing by providing a structure that facilitates investments in socially beneficial, for-profit ventures by simplifying compliance with Internal Revenue Service rules for program-related investments, a type of investment that private foundations are allowed to make.[1][2][3][4]Contents1 Concept 2 Legislation 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksConcept[edit] An L3C is a for-profit, social enterprise venture tha
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Limited Liability Limited Partnership
The limited liability limited partnership (LLLP) is a relatively new modification of the limited partnership, a form of business entity recognized under United States commercial law. An LLLP is a limited partnership and as such consists of one or more general partners and one or more limited partners. Typically, while the general partners manage the LLLP, the limited partners' interest is purely financial. Thus, the most common use of a limited partnership is for purposes of investment, often through a number of private equity firms
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