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Corethrellidae
Corethrella Freeman, 1962[1] Lutzomiops Wikispecies
Wikispecies
has information related to CorethrellidaeThe Corethrellidae
Corethrellidae
are a family of parasitic midges, small flying insects belonging to the order Diptera, that are commonly known to parasitize frogs. The members of the family are sometimes known as "frog-biting midges". The family currently consists of just two genera, totalling around 97 species worldwide. Several fossil species are known. Most extant species are found in the lower latitudes, usually associated around the tropics.[1] They are tiny flies with a wing length of 0.6-2.5 mm. The wing venation is similar to Culicidae
Culicidae
(R 4 branched, M 2 branched,Cu 2 branched) with branches of Rs and M nearly parallel
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Cretaceous
The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
( /krɪˈteɪʃəs/, kri-TAY-shəs) is a geologic period and system that spans 79 million years from the end of the Jurassic
Jurassic
Period 145 million years ago (mya) to the beginning of the Paleogene Period 66 mya. It is the last period of the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
Era. The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
Period is usually abbreviated K, for its German translation Kreide (chalk). The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
was a period with a relatively warm climate, resulting in high eustatic sea levels that created numerous shallow inland seas. These oceans and seas were populated with now-extinct marine reptiles, ammonites and rudists, while dinosaurs continued to dominate on land. During this time, new groups of mammals and birds, as well as flowering plants, appeared
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Trypanosomiasis
Trypanosomiasis
Trypanosomiasis
or trypanosomosis is the name of several diseases in vertebrates caused by parasitic protozoan trypanosomes of the genus Trypanosoma.[citation needed] In humans this includes African trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease
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Extant Taxon
Neontology is a part of biology that, in contrast to paleontology, deals with living (or, more generally, recent) organisms. It is the study of extant taxa (singular: extant taxon): taxa (such as species, genera and families) with members still alive, as opposed to (all) being extinct. For example:The moose (Alces alces) is an extant species, and the dodo is an extinct species. In the group of molluscs known as the cephalopods, as of 1987[update] there were approximately 600 extant species and 7,500 extinct species.[1]A taxon can be classified as extinct if it is broadly agreed or certified that no members of the group are still alive. Conversely, an extinct taxon can be reclassified as extant if there are new discoveries of extant species ("Lazarus species"), or if previously-known extant species are reclassified as members of the taxon. The term neontologist is used largely by paleontologists referring to nonpaleontologists
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Tropics
The tropics are a region of the Earth
Earth
surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer
Tropic of Cancer
in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′12.9″ (or 23.43692°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn
Tropic of Capricorn
in the Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
at 23°26′12.9″ (or 23.43692°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone)
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Johnston's Organ
Johnston's organ is a collection of sensory cells found in the pedicel (the second segment) of the antennae in the Class Insecta.[1] Johnston's organ detects motion in the flagellum (third and typically final antennal segment). It consists of scolopidia arrayed in a bowl shape, each of which contains a mechanosensory chordotonal neuron.[2][3] The number of scolopidia varies between species. In homopterans, the Johnston’s organs contain 25 - 79 scolopidia.[4] The presence of Johnston's organ is a defining characteristic which separates the Class Insecta
Insecta
from the other hexapods belonging to the group Entognatha
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Hyla
See textThe genus Hyla
Hyla
is a member of the family of tree frogs (Hylidae). They have a very broad distribution; species can be found in Europe, Asia, Africa, and across the Americas. There were more than 300 described species in this genus, but after a major revision of the family Hylidae
Hylidae
most of these have been moved to new genera so the genus now only contains 33 species".[1] The genus was established by Josephus Nicolaus Laurenti in 1768. It was named after Hylas
Hylas
in Greek mythology, the companion of Hercules. The name is unusual in that – though Laurenti knew that Hylas
Hylas
was male – the name is unambiguously treated in the feminine grammatical gender for reasons unknown
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Hyla Avivoca
The bird-voiced tree frog[1] (Hyla avivoca) is a species of frog in the Hylidae family, endemic to the United States. Its natural habitats are temperate forests, shrub-dominated wetlands, and swamps.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Behavior 4 Status 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] The bird-voiced tree frog is a small species growing to about 5 cm (2.0 in) long. It is usually a dappled, pale grey or brown on its dorsal surface, but its color changes with the temperature and its level of activity, and may be more or less pale green. It often has a dark brown cross-shaped mark on its back and further dark areas on its limbs. Its belly is grey with flashes of yellow on the underside of its hind legs. The male has a dark throat. This frog is very similar to the larger gray tree frog (Hyla versicolor), but that species has an orange flash on its hind legs. Both have a whitish square region just underneath the eyes
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Hyla Cinerea
Calamita cinerea Schneider, 1799 Hyla viridis Holbrook, 1842 Hyla cinerea Garman, 1892 Hyla carolinensis Cope, 1889The American green tree frog (Hyla cinerea) is a common species of New World tree frog belonging to the genus Hyla. A common backyard species, it is popular as a pet, and is the state amphibian of Georgia and Louisiana.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Behavior3.1 Breeding 3.2 Feeding4 As pets 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] The frog is green, medium-sized, and up to 6 cm (2.5 in) long. Their bodies are usually green in shades ranging from bright yellowish-olive to lime green. The color can change depending on lighting or temperature. Small patches of gold or white may occur on the skin, and they may also have a white, pale yellow, or cream-colored lines running from their jaws or upper lips to their groins. They have smooth skin and large toe pads. Their abdomens are pale yellow to white
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Hyla Gratiosa
Hyla gratiosa (barking tree frog) is a species of tree frog endemic to the southeastern United States.Contents1 Geographic range 2 Description 3 Behavior 4 References 5 External linksGeographic range[edit] It is found from Delaware to southern Florida and eastern Louisiana, usually in coastal areas. Description[edit] Hyla gratiosa is the largest native tree frog in the United States. It is 5 to 7 cm (2.0 to 2.8 in) in head-body length. It is variable in color, but easily recognizable due to the characteristic dark, round markings on its dorsum. Individuals may be bright or dull green, brown, yellowish, or gray in color. It has prominent, round toe pads, and the male has a large vocal sac. Behavior[edit]EggsMetamorphHyla gratiosa males callingThe barking tree frog is known for its loud, strident, barking call. It may also utter a repetitive single-syllable mating call
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Vector (epidemiology)
In epidemiology, a disease vector is any agent that carries and transmits an infectious pathogen into another living organism;[1][2] most agents regarded as vectors are organisms, such as intermediate parasites or microbes, but it could be an inanimate medium of infection such as dust particles.[3]Contents1 Arthropods 2 Plants and fungi 3 World Health Organization
World Health Organization
and vector-borne disease 4 Vector-borne zoonotic disease and human activity 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksArthropods[edit]The deer tick, a vector for Lyme disease
Lyme disease
pathogens.Arthropods form a major group of pathogen vectors with mosquitoes, flies, sand flies, lice, fleas, ticks, and mites transmitting a huge number of pathogens. Many such vectors are haematophagous, which feed on blood at some or all stages of their lives. When the insects blood feed, the pathogen enters the blood stream of the host
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Trypanosoma
Trypanosoma
Trypanosoma
is a genus of kinetoplastids (class Kinetoplastida), a monophyletic[1] group of unicellular parasitic flagellate protozoa. The name is derived from the Greek trypano- (borer) and soma (body) because of their corkscrew-like motion. Most trypanosomes are heteroxenous (requiring more than one obligatory host to complete life cycle) and most are transmitted via a vector. The majority of species are transmitted by blood-feeding invertebrates, but there are different mechanisms among the varying species. Some, such as Trypanosoma
Trypanosoma
equiperdum, are spread by direct contact
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Burma
Myanmar
Myanmar
(Burmese: [mjəmà]),[nb 1][8] officially the Republic
Republic
of the Union of Myanmar
Myanmar
and also known as Burma, is a sovereign state in Southeast Asia. Myanmar
Myanmar
is bordered by India
India
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to its west, Thailand
Thailand
and Laos
Laos
to its east and China
China
to its north and northeast. To its south, about one third of Myanmar's total perimeter of 5,876 km (3,651 mi) forms an uninterrupted coastline of 1,930 km (1,200 mi) along the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
and the Andaman Sea. The country's 2014 census counted the population to be 51 million people.[9] As of 2017, the population is about 54 million.[5] Myanmar is 676,578 square kilometres (261,228 square miles) in size
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Megaannum
A year is the orbital period of the Earth
Earth
moving in its orbit around the Sun. Due to the Earth's axial tilt, the course of a year sees the passing of the seasons, marked by changes in weather, the hours of daylight, and, consequently, vegetation and soil fertility. In temperate and subpolar regions around the planet, four seasons are generally recognized: spring, summer, autumn and winter. In tropical and subtropical regions several geographical sectors do not present defined seasons; but in the seasonal tropics, the annual wet and dry seasons are recognized and tracked. The current year is 2018. A calendar year is an approximation of the number of days of the Earth's orbital period as counted in a given calendar. The Gregorian, or modern, calendar, presents its calendar year to be either a common year of 365 days or a leap year of 366 days, as do the Julian calendars; see below
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Amber
Amber
Amber
is fossilized tree resin, which has been appreciated for its color and natural beauty since Neolithic
Neolithic
times.[2] Much valued from antiquity to the present as a gemstone, amber is made into a variety of decorative objects.[3] Amber
Amber
is used in jewelry. It has also been used as a healing agent in folk medicine. There are five classes of amber, defined on the basis of their chemical constituents
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Zootaxa
Zootaxa is a peer-reviewed scientific mega journal for animal taxonomists. It is published by Magnolia Press (Auckland, New Zealand). The journal was established by Zhi-Qiang Zhang in 2001 and new issues are published multiple times a week. As of December 2012[update] more than 26,300 new taxa have been described in the journal.[1] Print and online versions are available. See also[edit]ZooKeys PhytotaxaReferences[edit]^ Zootaxa StatisticsExternal links[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Media from Zootaxa.Official website Wikispecies
Wikispecies
has information related to ISSN 1175-5326This article about a zoology journal is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about academic journals
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