HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Coca-Cola
Coca-Cola, or Coke, is a carbonated soft drink[1] produced by The Coca- Cola
Cola
Company. Originally intended as a patent medicine, it was invented in the late 19th century by John Pemberton
John Pemberton
and was bought out by businessman Asa Griggs Candler, whose marketing tactics led Coca- Cola
Cola
to its dominance of the world soft-drink market throughout the 20th century. The drink's name refers to two of its original ingredients, which were kola nuts (a source of caffeine) and coca leaves. The current formula of Coca- Cola
Cola
remains a trade secret, although a variety of reported recipes and experimental recreations have been published. The Coca-Cola Company
The Coca-Cola Company
produces concentrate, which is then sold to licensed Coca- Cola
Cola
bottlers throughout the world
[...More...]

"Coca-Cola" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carbonated Water
Carbonated water
Carbonated water
(also known as sparkling water, seltzer water, seltzer, bubbly water, or fizzy water, or the closely related club soda or soda water) is water into which carbon dioxide gas under pressure has been dissolved. Club soda or soda water may have additives, such as sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate or similar, but seltzer water is almost always composed of water and carbon dioxide with no other additives. Carbonation is the process that causes the water to become effervescent. Most carbonated water is sold in ready to drink bottles like carbonated beverages such as soft drinks, but it can also be prepared at home with soda makers. Carbonated water
Carbonated water
was invented by Joseph Priestley
Joseph Priestley
in 1767 when he discovered a method of infusing water with carbon dioxide after suspending a bowl of water above a beer vat at a brewery in Leeds, England
[...More...]

"Carbonated Water" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Morphine
Morphine
Morphine
is a pain medication of the opiate variety which is found naturally in a number of plants and animals.[5][7] It acts directly on the central nervous system (CNS) to decrease the feeling of pain.[5] It can be taken for both acute pain and chronic pain.[5] It is frequently used for pain from myocardial infarction and during labour.[5] It can be given by mouth, by injection into a muscle, by injecting under the skin, intravenously, into the space around the spinal cord, or rectally.[5] Maximum effect is around 20 minutes when given intravenously and 60 minutes when given by mouth, while duration of effect i
[...More...]

"Morphine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Carbonation
Carbonation refers to reactions of carbon dioxide to give carbonates, bicarbonates, and carbonic acid.[1] In chemistry, the terms is sometimes used in place of carboxylation, which refers to the formation of carboxylic acids. In inorganic chemistry and geology, carbonation is common. Metal hydroxides (MOH) and metal oxides (M'O) react with CO2 to give bicarbonates and carbonates:MOH + CO2 → M(HCO3) M'O + CO2 → M'CO3In reinforced concrete construction, the chemical reaction between carbon dioxide in the air and calcium hydroxide and hydrated calcium silicate in the concrete is known as neutralisation. Henry's Law[edit] Henry's Law states that PCO2=KBxCO2 Where PCO2 is the partial pressure of CO2 gas above the solution. KB is Henry's Law Constant. KB increases as temperature increase. xCO2 is the mole fraction of CO2 gas in the solution
[...More...]

"Carbonation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vending Machine
A vending machine is an automated machine that provides items such as snacks, beverages, alcohol, cigarettes and lottery tickets to consumers after money, a credit card, or specially designed card is inserted into the machine.[1] The first modern vending machines were developed in England
England
in the early 1880s and dispensed postcards. Vending machines exist in many countries, and in more recent times, specialized vending machines that provide less common products compared to traditional vending machine items have been created and provided to consumers.Contents1 History1.1 Modern vending mach
[...More...]

"Vending Machine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Postobón
Postobón, S.A. (Spanish pronunciation: [postoˈβon] ) is the largest Colombian beverage company, and also one of the largest in South America. The company has a wide portfolio of products that includes soft drinks, fruit juices, bottled water, tea, and energy drinks. It has created soft drinks such as "Manzana Postobón", an apple-flavored soda, and its most popular "Colombiana", a "cola champagne." Additional flavors of Postobón
Postobón
soda beyond apple include grape, orange, pineapple, and lemon. Postobón
Postobón
has expanded its product line by including bottled water and boxed juices; the latter are currently sold under the brandname Hit. History[edit] On October 11, 1904, Gabriel Posada and Valerio Tobón (the company's name being a portmanteau of their last names) started to produce soft drinks
[...More...]

"Postobón" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Foodservice
Foodservice (US English) or catering industry (British English) defines those businesses, institutions, and companies responsible for any meal prepared outside the home.[1] This industry includes restaurants, school and hospital cafeterias, catering operations, and many other formats.[1] The companies that supply foodservice operators are called foodservice distributors. Foodservice distributors sell goods like small wares (kitchen utensils) and foods. Some companies manufacture products in both consumer and foodservice versions. The consumer version usually comes in individual-sized packages with elaborate label design for retail sale
[...More...]

"Foodservice" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
[...More...]

"American Civil War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Caramel Color
Caramel color
Caramel color
or caramel coloring is a water-soluble food coloring. It is made by heat treatment of carbohydrates, in general in the presence of acids, alkalis, or salts, in a process called caramelization. It is more fully oxidized than caramel candy, and has an odor of burnt sugar and a somewhat bitter taste. Its color ranges from pale yellow to amber to dark brown. Caramel color
Caramel color
is one of the oldest and most widely used food colorings for enhancing naturally occurring colors, correcting natural variations in color, and replacing color that is lost to light degradation during food processing and storage.[1] The use of caramel color as a food additive in the brewing industry in the 19th century is the first recorded instance of it being manufactured and used on a wide scale
[...More...]

"Caramel Color" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prohibition
Prohibition
Prohibition
is the illegality of the manufacturing, storage in barrels or bottles, transportation, sale, possession, and consumption of alcohol including alcoholic beverages, or a period of time during which such illegality was enforced
[...More...]

"Prohibition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cent (currency)
In many national currencies, the cent, commonly represented by the cent sign (a minuscule letter "c" crossed by a diagonal stroke or a vertical line: ¢; or a simple "c") is a monetary unit that equals ​1⁄100 of the basic monetary unit. Etymologically, the word cent derives from the Latin
Latin
word "centum" meaning hundred. Cent also refers to a coin worth one cent. In the United States, the 1¢ coin is generally known by the nickname penny, alluding to the British coin and unit of that name. In Canada, the 1¢ coin is no longer produced since 2012.Contents1 Symbol 2 Usage 3 See also 4 ReferencesSymbol[edit] "¢" redirects here. For the musical symbol, see cut time. A cent is commonly represented by the cent sign, a minuscule letter "c" crossed by a diagonal stroke or a vertical line: ¢; or a simple "c", depending on the currency (see below)
[...More...]

"Cent (currency)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Concentrate
A concentrate is a form of substance which has had the majority of its base component (in the case of a liquid: the solvent) removed. Typically, this will be the removal of water from a solution or suspension, such as the removal of water from fruit juice. One benefit of producing a concentrate is that of a reduction in weight and volume for transportation, as the concentrate can be reconstituted at the time of usage by the addition of the solvent. Soft drink
Soft drink
concentrates[edit] The process of concentrating orange juice was patented in 1948.[1] It was originally developed to provide World War II troops with a reliable source of vitamin C.[2] [3] Today, the majority of retailed orange juice is made from reconstituted orange juice concentrate. Most sodas and soft drinks are produced as highly concentrated syrups and later diluted with carbonated water directly before consumption or bottling
[...More...]

"Concentrate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Georgia (U.S. State)
Georgia (/ˈdʒɔːrdʒə/ ( listen) JOR-jə) is a state in the Southeastern United States. It began as a British colony in 1733, the last of the original Thirteen Colonies.[5] Named after King George II of Great Britain,[6] the Province of Georgia
Province of Georgia
covered the area from South Carolina
South Carolina
down to Spanish Florida
Spanish Florida
and New France
New France
along Louisiana (New France), also bordering to the west towards the Mississippi River. Georgia was the fourth state to ratify the United States Constitution, on January 2, 1788.[7] In 1802–1804, western Georgia was split to the Mississippi
Mississippi
Territory, which later split to form Alabama
Alabama
with part of former West Florida
West Florida
in 1819
[...More...]

"Georgia (U.S. State)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Interbrand
Jez Frampton, Global CEO, Andy Payne, Global Chief Creative Officer, Stuart Green, CEO Asia Pacific, Gonzalo Brujó, CEO EMEA & LatAm,Services Strategy, Valuation, Design, Analytics, Naming, DigitalParent Omnicom
Omnicom
GroupWebsite www.interbrand.comInterbrand, a division of Omnicom, is a brand consultancy, specializing in areas such as brand strategy, brand analytics, brand valuation, corporate design, digital brand management, packaging design, and naming. Interbrand
Interbrand
has 24 offices in 17 countries.[1]Contents1 History 2 Best Global Brands2.1 Methodology3 Client roster 4 Awards 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Interbrand
Interbrand
was founded by John Murphy, a native of Essex in the United Kingdom
[...More...]

"Interbrand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fulton County, Georgia
Fulton County is a county in the north central portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of 2017 estimates, the population was 1,041,423, making it Georgia's most populous county and the state's only county with over 1 million inhabitants. Its county seat is Atlanta,[1] which has also been the state capital since 1868. Ninety percent of the City of Atlanta is within Fulton County (the other 10% lies within DeKalb County). Fulton County is the principal county of the Atlanta metropolitan area. Fulton County is part of the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area.Contents1 History 2 Government 3 Services 4 Politics4.1 Taxation 4.2 Municipalization 4.3 Secession5 Taxes 6 Geography6.1 Adjacent counties 6.2 National protected areas7 Transportation7.1 Major highways7.1.1 Interstate highways 7.1.2 U.S
[...More...]

"Fulton County, Georgia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Coca Wine
Coca wine
Coca wine
is an alcoholic beverage combining wine with cocaine.[1] One popular brand was Vin Mariani, developed in 1863 by French-Corsican entrepreneur Angelo Mariani.[2] At the end of the 19th century, the fear of drug abuse made coca-based drinks less popular. This led to the prohibition of cocaine in the United States in 1914 via the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act, and the removal of cocaine from coca wine as well as Coca-Cola, though coca leaf remained.[2] Coca wine
Coca wine
itself became illegal in the United States when its other main drug, alcohol, was banned just a few years later with Eighteenth Amendment in 1920.Peruvian Wine
Wine
of CocaCoca Mariani medal by Louis-Oscar RotyRelated beverages[edit] In Atlanta, John Pemberton, a pharmacist, developed a beverage based on Vin Mariani, called Pemberton's French Wine
Wine
Coca. It proved popular among American consumers
[...More...]

"Coca Wine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.