HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Cirillic
The Cyrillic script
Cyrillic script
/sɪˈrɪlɪk/ is a writing system used for various alphabets across Eurasia
Eurasia
(particularity in Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and North Asia). It is based on the Early Cyrillic alphabet developed during the 9th century AD at the Preslav Literary School in the First Bulgarian Empire.[2][3][4] It is the basis of alphabets used in various languages, especially those of Orthodox Slavic origin, and non- Slavic languages
Slavic languages
influenced by Russian
[...More...]

"Cirillic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cyrillic Alphabets
Numerous Cyrillic
Cyrillic
alphabets are based on the Cyrillic
Cyrillic
script. The early Cyrillic
Cyrillic
alphabet was developed in the First Bulgarian Empire during the 9th century AD at the Preslav Literary School
Preslav Literary School
by the disciples of the Byzantine theologians Cyril and Methodius. It is the basis of alphabets used in various languages, past and present, in parts of Southeastern Europe and Northern Eurasia, especially those of Slavic origin, and non- Slavic languages
Slavic languages
influenced by Russian. As of 2011, around 252 million people in Eurasia use it as the official alphabet for their national languages. About half of them are in Russia. Cyrillic
Cyrillic
is one of the most-used writing systems in the world. Some of these are illustrated below; for others, and for more detail, see the links
[...More...]

"Cyrillic Alphabets" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Central Asia
Central Asia
Asia
stretches from the Caspian Sea
Caspian Sea
in the west to China
China
in the east and from Afghanistan
Afghanistan
in the south to Russia
Russia
in the north. It is also colloquially referred to as "the stans" as the countries generally considered to be within the region all have names ending with the Persian suffix "-stan", meaning "land of".[1] Central Asia
Asia
has a population of about 70 million, consisting of five republics: Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
(pop. 18 million), Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
(6 million), Tajikistan
Tajikistan
(9 million), Turkmenistan
Turkmenistan
(6 million), and Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan
(31 million)
[...More...]

"Central Asia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

ISO 15924
ISO 15924, Codes for the representation of names of scripts, defines two sets of codes for a number of writing systems (scripts). Each script is given both a four-letter code and a numeric one.[1] Script is defined as "set of graphic characters used for the written form of one or more languages".[1] Where possible the codes are derived from ISO 639-2 where the name of a script and the name of a language using the script are identical (example: Gujarātī ISO 639 guj, ISO 15924 Gujr). Preference is given to the 639-2 Bibliographical codes, which is different from the otherwise often preferred use of the Terminological codes.[1] 4-letter ISO 15924 codes are incorporated into the Language Subtag Registry for IETF language tags and so can be used in file formats that make use of such language tags
[...More...]

"ISO 15924" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Unicode Range
The Unicode Consortium
Unicode Consortium
(UC) and the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) collaborate on the Universal Character Set (UCS). The UCS is an international standard to map characters used in natural language, mathematics, music, and other domains to machine readable values. By creating this mapping, the UCS enables computer software vendors to interoperate and transmit UCS encoded text strings from one to another. Because it is a universal map, it can be used to represent multiple languages at the same time. This avoids the confusion of using multiple legacy character encodings, which can result in the same sequence of codes having multiple meanings and thus be improperly decoded if the wrong one is chosen. UCS has a potential capacity to encode over 1 million characters
[...More...]

"Unicode Range" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Phonetic Alphabet
The International Phonetic Alphabet
Alphabet
(IPA) is an alphabetic system of phonetic notation based primarily on the Latin alphabet
[...More...]

"International Phonetic Alphabet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Replacement Character
Specials is a short Unicode
Unicode
block allocated at the very end of the Basic Multilingual Plane, at U+FFF0–FFFF. Of these 16 code points, five are assigned as of Unicode
Unicode
10.0:U+FFF9 INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION ANCHOR, marks start of annotated text U+FFFA INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION SEPARATOR, marks start of annotating character(s) U+FFFB INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION TERMINATOR, marks end of annotation block U+FFFC  OBJECT REPLACEMENT CHARACTER, placeholder in the text for another unspecified object, for example in a compound document. U+FFFD � REPLACEMENT CHARACTER used to replace an unknown, unrecognized or unrepresentable character U+FFFE <noncharacter-FFFE> not a character. U+FFFF <noncharacter-FFFF> not a character.FFFE and FFFF are not unassigned in the usual sense, but guaranteed not to be a Unicode
Unicode
character at all
[...More...]

"Replacement Character" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Unicode
Unicode
Unicode
is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world's writing systems. The latest version contains a repertoire of 136,755 characters covering 139 modern and historic scripts, as well as multiple symbol sets
[...More...]

"Unicode" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mojibake
Mojibake
Mojibake
(文字化け) (IPA: [mod͡ʑibake]) is the garbled text that is the result of text being decoded using an unintended character encoding.[1] The result is a systematic replacement of symbols with completely unrelated ones, often from a different writing system. This display may include the generic replacement character � in places where the binary representation is considered invalid. A replacement can also involve multiple consecutive symbols, as viewed in one encoding, when the same binary code constitutes one symbol in the other encoding. This is either because of differing constant length encoding (as in Asian 16-bit encodings vs European 8-bit encodings), or the use of variable length encodings (notably UTF-8
UTF-8
and UTF-16). Failed rendering of glyphs due to either missing fonts or missing glyphs in a font is a different issue that is not to be confused with mojibake
[...More...]

"Mojibake" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Writing System
A writing system is any conventional method of visually representing verbal communication. While both writing and speech are useful in conveying messages, writing differs in also being a reliable form of information storage and transfer.[1] The processes of encoding and decoding writing systems involve shared understanding between writers and readers of the meaning behind the sets of characters that make up a script. Writing
Writing
is usually recorded onto a durable medium, such as paper or electronic storage, although non-durable methods may also be used, such as writing on a computer display, on a blackboard, in sand, or by skywriting. The general attributes of writing systems can be placed into broad categories such as alphabets, syllabaries, or logographies. Any particular system can have attributes of more than one category
[...More...]

"Writing System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Eurasia
Eurasia
Eurasia
/jʊəˈreɪʒə/ is a combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia.[3][4][5] The term is a portmanteau of its constituent continents ( Europe
Europe
and Asia)
[...More...]

"Eurasia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
Europe
is the eastern part of the European continent. There is no consensus on the precise area it covers, partly because the term has a wide range of geopolitical, geographical, cultural, and socioeconomic connotations. There are "almost as many definitions of Eastern Europe
Europe
as there are scholars of the region".[1] A related United Nations
United Nations
paper adds that "every assessment of spatial identities is essentially a social and cultural construct".[2] One definition describes Eastern Europe
Europe
as a cultural entity: the region lying in Europe
Europe
with the main characteristics consisting of Greek, Byzantine, Eastern Orthodox, Russian, and some Ottoman culture influences.[3][4] Another definition was created during the Cold War and used more or less synonymously with the term Eastern Bloc
[...More...]

"Eastern Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Caucasus
 Abkhazia Artsakh South OssetiaAutonomous republics and federal regions Russia Adygea  Chechnya  Dagestan  Ingushetia  Kabardino-Balkaria Karachay-Cherkessia  Krasnodar Krai North Ossetia-Alania  Stavropol Krai Georgia Adjara Abkhazia (since 2008, in exile) Azerbaijan NakhchivanDemonym CaucasianTime Zones UTC+02:00, UTC+03:00, UTC+03:30, UTC+4:00, UTC+04:30The Caucasus
Caucasus
/ˈkɔːkəsəs/ or Caucasia /kɔːˈkeɪʒə/ is a region located at the border of
[...More...]

"Caucasus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

North Asia
Largest City NovosibirskMajor citiesBarnaul Chelyabinsk Irkutsk Kemerovo Khabarovsk Krasnoyarsk Novokuznetsk Novosibirsk Omsk Tomsk Tyumen Vladivostok Yakutsk Yekaterinburg OthersPopulation (2017) • Total 33,765,005Time zoneUTC+5 / MSK+2 UTC+6 / MSK+3 UTC+7 / MSK+4 UTC+8 / MSK+5 UTC+9 / MSK+6 UTC+10
UTC+10
/ MSK+7 UTC+11
[...More...]

"North Asia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Armenian Alphabet
The Armenian alphabet
Armenian alphabet
(Armenian: Հայոց գրեր Hayoc' grer or Հայոց այբուբեն Hayoc' aybowben; Eastern Armenian: [haˈjotsʰ ajbuˈbɛn]; Western Armenian: [haˈjotsʰ ajpʰuˈpʰɛn]) is an alphabetical writing system used to write Armenian. It was developed around 405 AD by Mesrop Mashtots, an Armenian linguist and ecclesiastical leader. It originally had 36 letters, but now has 39. The Armenian word for "alphabet" is այբուբեն aybooben, named after the first two letters of the Armenian alphabet: ⟨Ա⟩ Armenian: այբ ayb and ⟨Բ⟩ Armenian: բեն ben
[...More...]

"Armenian Alphabet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Preslav Literary School
The Preslav
Preslav
Literary School ( Pliska
Pliska
Literary School, Bulgarian: Преславска книжовна школа) was the first literary school in the medieval Bulgarian Empire. It was established by Boris I in 885 or 886 in Bulgaria's capital, Pliska. In 893, Simeon I moved the seat of the school from Pliska
Pliska
to the new capital, Preslav. The Preslav
Preslav
Literary School was the most important literary and cultural centre of Bulgaria
Bulgaria
and all Slavs
Slavs
until it was captured and burnt by the Byzantine Emperor John I Tzimisces
John I Tzimisces
in the year 972. A number of prominent Bulgarian writers and scholars worked at the school, including Naum of Preslav
Preslav
(until 893), Constantine of Preslav, Joan Exarch, Chernorizets Hrabar, etc
[...More...]

"Preslav Literary School" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.