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Byzantine Calendar
The Byzantine calendar, also called "Creation Era of Constantinople" or " Era of the World" (Ancient Greek: Ἔτη Γενέσεως Κόσμου κατὰ Ῥωμαίους,[1] also Ἔτος Κτίσεως Κόσμου or Ἔτος Κόσμου, abbreviated as ε.Κ.), was the calendar used by the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
from c. 691 to 1728 in the Ecumenical Patriarchate. It was also the official calendar of the Byzantine Empire[note 1] from 988 to 1453, and of Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
and Russia from c. 988 to 1700. The calendar was based on the Julian calendar, except that the year started on 1 September and the year number used an Anno Mundi
Anno Mundi
epoch derived from the Septuagint
Septuagint
version of the Bible
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Genesis Creation Myth
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Genesis creation narrative
Genesis creation narrative
is the creation myth of both Judaism and Christianity.[1] Two creation stories are found in the first two chapters of the Book
Book
of Genesis. In the first Elohim, the Hebrew generic word for God, creates the heavens and the earth in six days, then rests on, blesses and sanctifies the seventh. In the second story, God, now referred to by the personal name Yahweh, creates Adam, the first man, from dust and places him in the Garden of Eden, where he is given dominion over the animals
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Nativity Of Jesus
The nativity of Jesus
Jesus
or birth of Jesus
Jesus
is described in the gospels of Luke and Matthew. The two accounts agree that Jesus
Jesus
was born in Bethlehem
Bethlehem
in the time of Herod the Great
Herod the Great
to a betrothed virgin whose name was Mary.[1] They also differ slightly in content, because they are two separate accounts, given by two individuals, thus each includes some details that the other chose to omit; however, this fact does not strongly evidence contradiction (as some believe) and the differences are not major. Matthew does not mention the census, annunciation to the shepherds or presentation in the Temple, does not give the name of the angel that appeared to Joseph to foretell the birth
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Septuagint
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eFragment of a Septuagint: A column of uncial book from 1 Esdras
1 Esdras
in the Codex Vaticanus
Codex Vaticanus
c. 325–350 CE, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton's Greek edition and English translation.The Septuagint
Septuagint
(from the Latin
Latin
septuaginta, "seventy"), also known as the LXX, is a Koine Greek
Koine Greek
translation of a Hebraic textual tradition that included certain texts which were later included in the canonical Hebrew Bible
Bible
and other related texts which were not. As the primary Greek translation of the Old Testament, it is also called the Greek Old Testament
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Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Bible
Bible
(from Koine Greek
Koine Greek
τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books")[1] is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews
Jews
and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans. Many different authors contributed to the Bible
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Incarnation (Christianity)
In Christian theology, the doctrine of the Incarnation
Incarnation
holds that Jesus, the preexistent divine Logos ( Koine Greek
Koine Greek
for "Word") and the second hypostasis of the Trinity, God the Son
God the Son
and Son of the Father, taking on a human body and human nature, "was made flesh"[2] and conceived in the womb of Mary the Theotokos
Theotokos
(Greek for "God-bearer"; Latin: Mater Dei, lit. 'Mother of God'). The doctrine of the Incarnation, then, entails that Jesus
Jesus
Christ
Christ
is fully God and fully human, His two natures joined in hypostatic union. In the Incarnation, as traditionally defined by those Churches that adhere to the Council of Chalcedon, the divine nature of the Son was united but not mixed with human nature[3] in one divine Person, Jesus Christ, Who was both "truly God and truly man"
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Dating Creation
Dating creation
Dating creation
is the attempt to provide an estimate of the age of Earth
Earth
or the age of the universe as understood through the origin myths of various religious traditions. Various traditional beliefs held that Planet Earth, or the entire Universe, was brought into being in a grand creation event by one or more gods
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Metonic Cycle
For astronomy and calendar studies, the Metonic cycle
Metonic cycle
or Enneadecaeteris (from Ancient Greek: ἐννεακαιδεκαετηρίς, "nineteen years") is a period of very close to 19 years that is nearly a common multiple of the solar year and the synodic (lunar) month. The Greek astronomer Meton of Athens (fifth century BC) observed that a period of 19 years is almost exactly equal to 235 synodic months and, rounded to full days, counts 6,940 days. The difference between the two periods (of 19 years and 235 synodic months) is only a few hours, depending on the definition of the year. Considering a year to be ​1⁄19 of this 6,940-day cycle gives a year length of 365 + ​1⁄4 + ​1⁄76 days (the unrounded cycle is much more accurate), which is about 11 days more than 12 synodic months
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Solar Cycle (calendar)
The solar cycle is a 28-year cycle of the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
with respect to the week. It occurs because leap years occur every 4 years and there are 7 possible days to start a leap year, making a 28-year sequence. This cycle also occurs in the Gregorian calendar, but it is interrupted by years such as 1800, 1900, 2100, 2200, 2300 and 2500, which are divisible by four but which are common years. This interruption has the effect of skipping 16 years of the solar cycle between February 28 and March 1. Because the Gregorian cycle of 400 years has exactly 146,097 days, i.e
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Indiction
An indiction is any of the years in a 15-year cycle used to date medieval documents throughout Europe, both East and West. Each year of a cycle was numbered: first indiction, second indiction, etc. However, the cycles were not numbered, thus other information is needed to identify the specific year. When the term began to be used, it referred only to the full cycle, and individual years were referred to as being Year 1 of the indiction, Year 2 of the indiction, etc. But usage changed, and it gradually became common to talk of the 1st indiction, the 2nd indiction, and so on. This can be confusing for modern readers, and it might be more useful if translators were to write 'the first of the indiction' and so on. Indictions originally referred to the periodic reassessment for an agricultural or land tax in late third-century Roman Egypt. These were originally in 5-year cycles beginning in 287 AD, then in a non-cyclic series which reached number 26 by 318 AD
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Easter
Easter,[nb 1] also called Pascha (Greek, Latin)[nb 2] or Resurrection Sunday,[3][4] is a festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
from the dead, described in the New Testament
New Testament
as having occurred on the third day of his burial after his crucifixion by the Romans at Calvary
Calvary
c
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Computus
Computus
Computus
( Latin
Latin
for "computation") is a calculation that determines the calendar date of Easter. Because the date is based on a calendar-dependent equinox rather than the astronomical one, there are differences between calculations done according to the Julian calendar and the modern Gregorian calendar. The name has been used for this procedure since the early Middle Ages, as it was considered the most important computation of the age. For most of their history Christians have calculated Easter independently of the Jewish calendar. In principle, Easter
Easter
falls on the Sunday following the full moon that follows the northern spring equinox (the paschal full moon). However, the vernal equinox and the full moon are not determined by astronomical observation
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Crucifixion Of Jesus
The crucifixion of Jesus
Jesus
occurred in 1st century Judea, most likely between AD 30 and 33. Jesus' crucifixion is described in the four canonical gospels, referred to in the New Testament
New Testament
epistles, attested to by other ancient sources, and is established as a historical event confirmed by non-Christian sources,[1] although among historians, there is no consensus on the precise details of what exactly occurred.[2][3][4] According to the canonical gospels, Jesus, the Christ, was arrested and tried by the Sanhedrin, and then sentenced by Pontius Pilate
Pontius Pilate
to be scourged, and finally crucified by the Romans.[5][6][7][8] Jesus
Jesus
was stripped of his clothing and offered wine mixed with myrrh or gall to drink before being crucified
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Anno Mundi
Anno Mundi
Anno Mundi
( Latin
Latin
for "in the year of the world"; Hebrew: לבריאת העולם‬, "to the creation of the world"), abbreviated as AM or A.M., or Year After Creation,[1] is a calendar era based on the biblical accounts of the creation of the world and subsequent history. Two such calendar eras have seen notable use historically:The Byzantine calendar
Byzantine calendar
was used in the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
and many Christian Orthodox countries and Eastern Orthodox Churches and was based on the Septuagint
Septuagint
text of the bible
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Western Europe
Western Europe
Europe
is the region comprising the western part of Europe. Below, some different geographic, geopolitical and cultural definitions of the term are outlined. Significant historical events that have shaped the concept of Western Europe
Europe
include the rise of Rome, the ado
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Jesus
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
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