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British Isles Naming Dispute
In British English
British English
usage, the toponym "British Isles" refers to a European archipelago consisting of Great Britain, Ireland
Ireland
and adjacent islands.[1] However, the word "British" is also an adjective and demonym referring to the United Kingdom[2] and more historically with the British Empire
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Terminology Of The British Isles
The terminology of the British Isles
British Isles
refers to the various words and phrases that are used to describe the different (and sometimes overlapping) geographical and political areas of the islands of Great Britain, Ireland, and the smaller islands which surround them. The terminology is often a source of confusion, partly owing to the similarity between some of the actual words used, but also because they are often used loosely
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Foras Na Gaeilge
Foras na Gaeilge
Foras na Gaeilge
(Irish pronunciation: [ˈfˠɔɾˠəsˠ n̪əˠ ˈɡeːlʲɟə], "Irish Institute"; often abbreviated to FnaG) is a public body responsible for the promotion of the Irish language throughout the island of Ireland, including both the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
and Northern Ireland
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The Isles
The Kingdom of the Isles comprised the Hebrides, the islands of the Firth of Clyde
Firth of Clyde
and the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
from the 9th to the 13th centuries AD. The islands were known to the Norse as the Suðreyjar, or "Southern Isles" as distinct from the Norðreyjar or Northern Isles
Northern Isles
of Orkney
Orkney
and Shetland. In Scottish Gaelic, the kingdom is known as Rìoghachd nan Eilean. The historical record is incomplete, and the kingdom was not a continuous entity throughout the entire period. The islands concerned are sometimes referred to as the Kingdom of Mann and the Isles, although only some of the later rulers claimed that title. At times the rulers were independent of external control, although for much of the period they had overlords in Norway, Ireland, England, Scotland or Orkney
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Marcel Berlins
Marcel Berlins (born 30 Oct 1941)[1][2] is a lawyer,[3] legal commentator, broadcaster, and columnist
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The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
is a British daily newspaper. It was known from 1821 until 1959 as the Manchester
Manchester
Guardian. Along with its sister papers The Observer and the Guardian Weekly, The Guardian
The Guardian
is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust
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Williamite War In Ireland
The Williamite
Williamite
War in Ireland
Ireland
(1688–1691) (Irish: Cogadh an Dá Rí,[2][3][4] meaning "war of the two kings"), was a conflict between Jacobites (supporters of the Catholic King James II of England
James II of England
and Ireland, VII of Scotland) and Williamites (supporters of the Dutch Protestant
Protestant
Prince William of Orange) over who would be monarch of the Kingdom of England, the Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
and the Kingdom of Ireland. It is also called the Jacobite War in Ireland
Ireland
or the Williamite–Jacobite War in Ireland. The cause of the war was the deposition of James as King of the Three Kingdoms in the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688. James was supported by the mostly Catholic "Jacobites" in Ireland
Ireland
and hoped to use the country as a base to regain his Three Kingdoms
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Republic Of Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen)), also known as the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
(Poblacht na hÉireann), is a sovereign state in north-western Europe
Europe
occupying 26 of 32 counties of the island of Ireland. The capital and largest city is Dublin, which is located on the eastern part of the island, and whose metropolitan area is home to around a third of the country's 4.75 million inhabitants. The state shares its only land border with Northern Ireland, a part of the United Kingdom. It is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the Celtic Sea to the south, Saint George's Channel
Saint George's Channel
to the south-east, and the Irish Sea to the east
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Isle Of Man
The Isle of Man
Isle of Man
(Manx: Ellan Vannin [ˈɛlʲən ˈvanɪn]), also known simply as Mann (/mæn/; Manx: Mannin [ˈmanɪn]), is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who holds the title of Lord of Mann
Lord of Mann
and is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. Defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. Ranked by the World Bank
World Bank
as the 5th richest nation in the world by GDP per capita,[6] the largest sectors are insurance and eGaming with 17% of GNP each, followed by ICT and banking with 9% each.[7] The island has been inhabited since before 6500 BC. Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged
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Éamon De Valera
Éamon de Valera[a][b] (/ˈeɪmən dɛvəˈlɛrə/; Irish pronunciation: [ˈeːmˠən̻ˠ dʲɛ ˈvˠalʲəɾʲə]; first registered as George de Valero; changed some time before 1901 to Edward de Valera;[1] 14 October 1882 – 29 August 1975) was a prominent statesman and political leader in 20th-century Ireland. His political career spanned over half a century, from 1917 to 1973; he served several terms as head of government and head of state. He also led the introduction of the Constitution
Constitution
of Ireland.[2][3] De Valera was a Commandant in the 1916 Easter Rising, a political leader in the War of Independence and of the anti-Treaty opposition in the ensuing Irish Civil War
Irish Civil War
(1922–1923)
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John Gunther
John Gunther
John Gunther
(August 30, 1901 – May 29, 1970) was an American journalist and author whose success came primarily through a series of popular sociopolitical works known as the "Inside" books (1936–1972), including the best-selling Inside U.S.A. in 1947. He is best known today for the memoir Death Be Not Proud about the death of his beloved teenage son, Johnny Gunther, from a brain tumor.Contents1 Personal life 2 Works2.1 Writings2.1.1 Inside series 2.1.2 Other non-fiction and fiction works 2.1.3 Death Be Not Proud2.2 Other Media2.2.1 Broadway - Inside U.S.A. 2.2.2 Television - High Road3 List of works3.1 Nonfiction 3.2 Novels4 References 5 External linksPersonal life[edit] Gunther was born in the Lakeview district of Chicago, growing up on the North Side of the city. He was the first child of a family of German descent
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Síle De Valera
Síle de Valera (Irish pronunciation: [ˈʃiːlʲə ˌdɛvəˈlɛrə]) (born 17 December 1954) is a former Irish Fianna Fáil politician who served as Minister of State for Adult Education, Youth Affairs and Educational Disadvantage and Minister for Arts, Heritage, Gaeltacht
Gaeltacht
and the Islands from 1997 to 2002. She served as a Teachta Dála (TD) from 1977 to 1981 and 1987 to 2007. She was a Member of the European Parliament
Member of the European Parliament
(MEP) for the Dublin
Dublin
constituency from 1979 to 1984.[1]Contents1 Early and personal life 2 Political career 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEarly and personal life[edit] Síle de Valera was born in 1954, in Dublin, Ireland. She was educated at Loreto College in Foxrock
Foxrock
and at University College Dublin, where she qualified as a career guidance teacher
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Dermot Ahern
Dermot Christopher Ahern (born 20 April 1955) is a former Irish Fianna Fáil politician who served as Minister for Justice and Law Reform from 2008 to 2011, Minister for Foreign Affairs from 2004 to 2008, Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources from 2002 to 2004, Minister for Social, Community and Family Affairs from 1997 to 2002 and Government Chief Whip and Minister of State at the Department of Defence from 1991 to 1992
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Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: Tuaisceart Éireann [ˈt̪ˠuəʃcəɾˠt̪ˠ ˈeːɾʲən̪ˠ] ( listen);[8] Ulster-Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in the north-east of the island of Ireland,[9][10] variously described as a country, province or region.[11][12][13] Northern Ireland
Ireland
shares a border to the south and west with the Republic of Ireland. In 2011, its population was 1,810,863,[4] constituting about 30% of the island's total population and about 3% of the UK's population
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Britishness
Britishness
Britishness
is the state or quality of being British,[2][3] or of embodying British characteristics.[3] It comprises the claimed qualities that bind and distinguish the British people
British people
and form the basis of their unity and identity,[4] and the expressions of British culture—such as habits, behaviours, or symbols—that have a common, familiar or iconic quality readily identifiable with the United Kingdom
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Unionism (Ireland)
Unionism may refer to:Contents1 Trades 2 Politics2.1 In the British isles3 Education 4 Religion 5 See alsoTrades[edit]Community unionism, the ways trade unions work with community organizations Craft unionism, a model of trade unionism in which workers are organised based on a particular craft or trade Dual unionism, the development of a union or political organization parallel to and within an existing labor union Industrial unionism, a labor union organizing method in which all workers in the same industry are organized into the same union New Unionism, a term which has been used twice in the history of the labour movement to describe moves to broaden the union agenda Open-source unionism, a term coined by academics Richard B
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