HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Latin
Latin (Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula. Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language. Latin and Ancient Greek roots are used in theology, biology, and medicine. By the late Roman Republic (75 BC), Old Latin had been standardised into Classical Latin
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Habitancum
Habitancum was an ancient Roman fort (castra) located at Risingham, Northumberland, England. The fort was one of the defensive structures built along Dere Street, a Roman road running from York to Corbridge and onwards to Melrose. The fort's name is from Habitanci on an altar set up by Marcus Gavius Secundinus a consular beneficiary on duty there. It is not mentioned in other sources such as the Notitia Dignitatum
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Colchester
Colchester /ˈklɛstər/ (About this sound listen) is an historic market town and the largest settlement within the borough of Colchester in the county of Essex. At the time of the 2011 UK Census, it had a population of 121,859, marking a considerable rise from the previous census and with considerable development since 2001 and ongoing building plans; it has been named as one of Britain's fastest growing towns. As the oldest recorded Roman town in Britain, Colchester is claimed to be the oldest town in Britain. It was for a time the capital of Roman Britain, and is a member of the Most Ancient European Towns Network. Colchester is some 50 miles (80 km) northeast of London and is connected to the capital by the A12 road and its railway station which is on the Great Eastern Main Line
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Carausian Revolt
The Carausian Revolt (AD 286–296) was an episode in Roman history, during which a Roman naval commander, Carausius, declared himself emperor over Britain and northern Gaul. His Gallic territories were retaken by the western Caesar Constantius Chlorus in 293, after which Carausius was assassinated by his subordinate Allectus
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Roman Withdrawal From Britain
The end of Roman rule in Britain was the transition from Roman Britain to post-Roman Britain. Roman rule ended in different parts of Britain at different times, and under different circumstances. In 383, the usurper Magnus Maximus withdrew troops from northern and western Britain, probably leaving local warlords in charge. Around 410, the Romano-British expelled the magistrates of the usurper Constantine III, ostensibly in response to his failures to use the Roman garrison he had stripped from Britain to protect the island. Roman Emperor Honorius replied to a request for assistance with the Rescript of Honorius, telling the Roman cities to see to their own defence, a tacit acceptance of temporary British self-government. Honorius was fighting a large-scale war in Italy against the Visigoths under their leader Alaric, with Rome itself under siege. No forces could be spared to protect distant Britain
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Lincoln, England
Lincoln (/ˈlɪŋkən/ LIN-kən) is a cathedral city and the county town of Lincolnshire in the East Midlands of England. The non-metropolitan district of Lincoln had a 2012 population of 94,600. The 2011 census gave the urban area of Lincoln, which includes North Hykeham and Waddington, a population of 130,200. The Roman town of Lindum Colonia developed from an Iron Age settlement. Lincoln's major landmarks are Lincoln Cathedral, a famous example of English Gothic architecture, and Lincoln Castle, an 11th-century Norman castle. The city is also home to the University of Lincoln, Bishop Grosseteste University and Lincoln City Football Club
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Great Conspiracy
The Great Conspiracy was a year-long state of war and disorder that occurred in Roman Britain near the end of the Roman occupation of the island. The historian Ammianus Marcellinus described it as a barbarica conspiratio that capitalized on a depleted military force in the province brought about by Magnentius' losses at the Battle of Mursa Major after his unsuccessful bid to become emperor. It is difficult to ascertain the exact chronology of the events because the main source—Ammianus—was living in Antioch at that time; thus his information looks second-hand and confused and, in addition, inconsistent with that produced by other sources
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Carlisle, Cumbria
Carlisle (/kɑːrˈll/ or locally /ˈkɑːrll/ from Cumbric: Caer Luel Scottish Gaelic: Cathair Luail) is a city and the county town of Cumbria. Historically in Cumberland, it is also the administrative centre of the City of Carlisle district in North West England. Carlisle is located at the confluence of the rivers Eden, Caldew and Petteril, 10 miles (16 km) south of the Scottish border. It is the largest settlement in the county of Cumbria, and serves as the administrative centre for both Carlisle City Council and Cumbria County Council. At the time of the 2001 census, the population of Carlisle was 71,773, with 100,734 living in the wider city
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Risingham
Habitancum was an ancient Roman fort (castra) located at Risingham, Northumberland, England. The fort was one of the defensive structures built along Dere Street, a Roman road running from York to Corbridge and onwards to Melrose. The fort's name is from Habitanci on an altar set up by Marcus Gavius Secundinus a consular beneficiary on duty there. It is not mentioned in other sources such as the Notitia Dignitatum
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Orkney
Orkney /ˈɔːrkni/ (Old Norse: Orkneyjar, Pictish: Insi Orc, "islands of the pigs"), also known as the Orkney Islands, is an archipelago in the Northern Isles of Scotland, situated off the north coast of Great Britain. Orkney is 16 kilometres (10 mi) north of the coast of Caithness and comprises approximately 70 islands, of which 20 are inhabited. The largest island, Mainland, is often referred to as "the Mainland". It has an area of 523 square kilometres (202 sq mi), making it the sixth-largest Scottish island and the tenth-largest island in the British Isles. The largest settlement and administrative centre is Kirkwall. A form of the name dates to the pre-Roman era and the islands have been inhabited for at least 8500 years, originally occupied by Mesolithic and Neolithic tribes and then by the Picts
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



List Of Late Roman Provinces
This article presents a list of Roman provinces in the Late Roman Empire, as found in the Notitia Dignitatum.

picture info

Notitia Dignitatum
The Notitia Dignitatum (Latin for "The List of Offices") is a document of the late Roman Empire that details the administrative organization of the Eastern and Western Empires. It is unique as one of very few surviving documents of Roman government and describes several thousand offices from the imperial court to provincial governments, diplomatic missions, and army units. It is usually considered to be accurate for the Western Roman Empire in the AD 420s and for the Eastern or Byzantine Empire in the AD 390s
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Roman Diocese
The word 'diocese' (Latin: dioecēsis, from the Greek word Greek: διοίκησις, "administration") means 'administration,' 'management,' 'assize district,' 'management district.' It can refer to the collection of taxes or to the territory per se. The earliest use of "diocese" as an administrative unit is in the Greek-speaking East. Three districts, Cibyra, Apamea, and Synnada, were added to the Province of Cilicia in the time of Cicero, who mentioned the fact in his epistles. In the 3rd century A.D. the word was applied to temporary districts, 'dioceses,' within proconsular proconsular provinces and assigned to officials called 'correctors,' whom the proconsuls brought with them (CAH XII, p. 161). At other times proconsular provinces subject to administrative reforms were governed by praetors
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]




Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in D:\Bitnami\wampstack-7.1.16-0\apache2\htdocs\php\PeriodicService.php on line 61