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Brahmic Scripts
Egyptian hieroglyphs 32 c. BCE --->
  • Proto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCE
  • Phoenician 12 c. BCE
  • Libyco-Berber 3 c. BCE
  • Paleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE
  • Aramaic 8 c. BCE
  • ---> --->
  • Hebrew 3 c. BCE
  • Pahlavi 3 c. BCE
  • Palmyrene 2 c. BCE
  • Syriac 2 c. BCE
  • --->
  • Sogdian 2 c. BCE
  • Old Uyghur
  • ---> --->
  • Mandaic 2 c
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    Tamil-Brahmi
    Tamil-Brahmi, or Tamili, is a variant of the Brahmi script used to write the Tamil language. These are the earliest documents of a Dravidian language, and the script was well established in the Chera and Pandyan states, in what is now Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Andhra Pradesh and Sri Lanka. Inscriptions have been found on cave beds, pot sherds, Jar burials, coins, seals, and rings. The language is Archaic Tamil, and led to classical Sangam literature. Tamil Brahmi differs in several ways from Ashokan Brahmi. It adds several letters for sounds not found in Prakrit: ṉ ṟ ṛ ḷ. Secondly, in many of the inscriptions the inherent vowel has been discarded: A consonant written without diacritics represents the consonant alone, whereas the Ashokan diacritic for long ā is used for both ā and short a in Tamil Brahmi
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    Kaithi
    Kaithi, also called "Kayathi" or "Kayasthi", is a historical script used widely in parts of North India, primarily in the former Awadh and Bihar
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    Prachalit Nepal Script
    Script may refer to:

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    Tocharian Alphabet
    The Tocharian alphabet is a version of Brahmi script used to write the Central Asian Indo-European Tocharian languages, mostly from the 8th century (with a few earlier ones) that were written on palm leaves, wooden tablets and Chinese paper, preserved by the extremely dry climate of the Tarim Basin. Samples of the language have been discovered at sites in Kucha and Karasahr, including many mural inscriptions. Tocharian A and B are not mutually intelligible. Properly speaking, based on the tentative interpretation of twqry as related to Tokharoi, only Tocharian A may be referred to as Tocharian, while Tocharian B could be called Kuchean (its native name may have been kuśiññe), but since their grammars are usually treated together in scholarly works, the terms A and B have proven useful. A common Proto-Tocharian language must precede the attested languages by several centuries, probably dating to the 1st millennium BC
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    Khmer Alphabet
    Egyptian hieroglyphs 32 c. BCE --->
  • Proto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCE
  • Phoenician 12 c. BCE
  • Libyco-Berber 3 c. BCE
  • Paleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE
  • Aramaic 8 c. BCE
  • ---> --->
  • Hebrew 3 c. BCE
  • Pahlavi 3 c. BCE
  • Palmyrene 2 c. BCE
  • Syriac 2 c. BCE
  • --->
  • Sogdian 2 c. BCE
  • Old Uyghur
  • ---> --->
  • Mandaic 2 c
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    Tirhuta or Mithilakshar is the script used for the Maithili language originating in the Mithila region of Bihar, India and the eastern Terai region of Nepal. The oldest reference to Tirhuta script is in Janaki Mandir where Rama and Sita are believed to have wed. The script has a rich history spanning a thousand years, but years of neglect by Nepal and the Bihar government have taken their toll on the use of Tirhuta. Most speakers of Maithili have switched to using the Devanagari script, which is also used to write neighboring Central Indic languages such as Nepali and Hindi
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    Eastern Nagari Script
    Eastern Nagari script, Bengali script, Assamese script, Bengali-Assamese script or Purbi script is the basis of the Bengali alphabet and the Assamese alphabet. Its usage is associated with the two main languages: Bengali and Assamese. Beside these two, the script has throughout history been used as writing system of other languages such as Bishnupriya Manipuri, Meitei Manipuri and Kokborok. Many other languages like Khasi, Bodo, Karbi, Mising etc. were also written in this script in the past. Modern Sylheti is often written using this script as well. Hence, this script is the 5th most widely used writing system in the world.
    Silver tanka of Danujamarddana issued at Chatigram (Chittagong) in the year Saka 1339 (= 1417 CE)
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    Sylheti Nagari
    Sylheti Nagari (Sylheti: ꠍꠤꠟꠐꠤ ꠘꠣꠉꠞꠤ Silôṭi Nagri) is an endangered script used for writing Sylheti. It is closely related to Kaithi, and has some Eastern Nagari influences
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    Ahom Alphabet
    The Ahom script is an abugida that is used to write the Ahom language, a nearly-extinct (but being revived) Tai language spoken by the Ahom people who ruled eastern part of Brahmaputra valley—about one-third of the length of Brahmaputra valley—in the Indian state of Assam between the 13th and the 18th centuries
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    Cham Alphabet
    The Cham alphabet is an abugida used to write Cham, an Austronesian language spoken by some 230,000 Chams in Vietnam and Cambodia
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    Ranjana Script
    The Rañjanā script (syn: Kutila, Lantsa) is an abugida writing system which developed in the 11th century. It is primarily used for writing the Newar language but is also used in Buddhist monasteries in India, China, Mongolia, and Japan. It is normally written from left to right but the Kutakshar form is written from top to bottom.

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    Siddhaṃ Script
    U+11580–U+115FF
    Final Accepted Script Proposal
    Variant Forms Siddhaṃ, also known in its later evolved form as Siddhamātṛkā, is a script used for writing Sanskrit from c. 550 – c. 1200. It is descended from the Brahmi script via the Gupta script and later evolved into the Assamese alphabet, the Maithili alphabet, the Bengali alphabet, and the Tibetan alphabet. There is some confusion over the spelling: Siddhāṃ and Siddhaṃ are both common, though Siddhaṃ is preferred as "correct". The script is a refinement of the script used during the Gupta Empire. The word Siddhaṃ means "accomplished" or "perfected" in Sanskrit. The script received its name from the practice of writing Siddhaṃ, or Siddhaṃ astu (may there be perfection), at the head of documents. Other names for the script include bonji (Japanese: 梵字) lit
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