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Billboard 200
The Billboard 200
Billboard 200
is a record chart ranking the 200 most popular music albums and EPs in the United States. It is published weekly by Billboard magazine. It is frequently used to convey the popularity of an artist or groups of artists. Often, a recording act will be remembered by its "number ones", those of their albums that outperformed all others during at least one week. The chart is based mostly on sales (both at retail and digital) of albums in the United States. The weekly sales period was originally Monday to Sunday when Nielsen started tracking sales in 1991, but since July 2015, tracking week begins on Friday (to coincide with the Global Release Date of the music industry) and ends on Thursday
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Record Chart
A record chart also called a music chart is a ranking of recorded music according to popularity during a given period of time. Many different criteria are used in different charts, including sales of records, cassettes and compact discs, the amount of radio airplay, and since the popularity of the Internet for music, the number of downloads and the amount of streaming activity. Some charts are specific to a particular musical genre and most to a particular geographical location (although download charts are not easily pinned down in this way). The most common period of time covered by a chart is one week with the chart being printed or broadcast at the end of this time
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Harry Belafonte
Harry Belafonte (born Harold George Bellanfanti Jr.; March 1, 1927) is an American singer, songwriter, actor, and social activist. One of the most successful Jamaican-American pop stars in history, he was dubbed the "King of Calypso" for popularizing the Caribbean musical style (originating in Trinidad & Tobago) with an international audience in the 1950s. His breakthrough album Calypso (1956) is the first million-selling LP by a single artist.[1] Belafonte is perhaps best known for singing "The Banana Boat Song", with its signature lyric "Day-O". He has recorded in many genres, including blues, folk, gospel, show tunes, and American standards
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Doctor Zhivago (film)
Doctor Zhivago is a 1965 British-Italian epic romantic drama film directed by David Lean. It is set in Russia
Russia
between the years prior to World War I
World War I
and the Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
of 1917–1922, and is based on the 1957 Boris Pasternak
Boris Pasternak
novel of the same name. While immensely popular in the West, the book was banned in the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
for decades. For this reason, the film could not be made in the Soviet Union and was instead filmed mostly in Spain. The film stars Omar Sharif
Omar Sharif
in the title role as Yuri Zhivago, a married physician whose life is irreversibly altered by the Russian Revolution and subsequent Civil War, and Julie Christie
Julie Christie
as his married love interest Lara Antipova
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Airline
An airline is a company that provides air transport services for traveling passengers and freight. Airlines utilize aircraft to supply these services and may form partnerships or alliances with other airlines for codeshare agreements. Generally, airline companies are recognized with an air operating certificate or license issued by a governmental aviation body. Airlines vary in size, from small domestic airlines to full-service international airlines. Airline services can be categorized as being intercontinental, domestic, regional, or international, and may be operated as scheduled services or charters. The largest airline currently is American Airlines Group.Contents1 History1.1 The first airlines 1.2 European airline industry1.2.1 Beginnings 1.2.2 Rationalization 1.2.3 Global expansion 1.2.4 EU airline deregulation1.3 U.S
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Retailers
Retail is the process of selling consumer goods or services to customers through multiple channels of distribution to earn a profit. Retailers satisfy demand identified through a supply chain. The term "retailer" is typically applied where a service provider fills the small orders of a large number of individuals, who are end-users, rather than large orders of a small number of wholesale, corporate or government clientele. Shopping generally refers to the act of buying products. Sometimes this is done to obtain final goods, including necessities such as food and clothing; sometimes it takes place as a recreational activity. Recreational shopping often involves window shopping and browsing: it does not always result in a purchase. Retail markets and shops have a very ancient history, dating back to antiquity. Over the centuries, retail shops were transformed from little more than "rude booths" to the sophisticated shopping malls of the modern era
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Radio
Radio
Radio
is the technology of using radio waves to carry information, such as sound, by systematically modulating properties of electromagnetic energy waves transmitted through space, such as their amplitude, frequency, phase, or pulse width.[n 1] When radio waves strike an electrical conductor, the oscillating fields induce an alternating current in the conductor. The information in the waves can be extracted and transformed back into its original form. Radio
Radio
systems need a transmitter to modulate (change) some property of the energy produced to impress a signal on it, for example using amplitude modulation or angle modulation (which can be frequency modulation or phase modulation). Radio
Radio
systems also need an antenna to convert electric currents into radio waves, and radio waves into an electric current. An antenna can be used for both transmitting and receiving
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Gold Album
Music recording sales certification is a system of certifying that a music recording has shipped or sold a certain number of copies
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Recording Industry Association Of America
The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is a trade organization that represents the recording industry in the United States
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Record Labels
A record label or record company is a brand or trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. Sometimes, a record label is also a publishing company that manages such brands and trademarks, coordinates the production, manufacture, distribution, marketing, promotion, and enforcement of copyright for sound recordings and music videos; also conducting talent scouting and development of new artists ("artists and repertoire" or "A&R"); and maintains contracts with recording artists and their managers
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Xbox Music
Groove Music (formerly Xbox Music and Zune Music, and also known as Microsoft Groove) was a digital music streaming service developed by Microsoft that offered music streaming through subscription or purchase through the Windows Store.[2][3] The service was web-based and also available via applications for the Microsoft Windows and Xbox product lines,[4][5] as well as Android and iOS.[6] The Groove catalogue has over 50 million tracks. Microsoft announced on October 2, 2017 that it would be shutting down the service by December 31, 2017.[7] Groove Music was officially discontinued on December 31st, 2017.Contents1 History 2 Features2.1 Groove Music Pass 2.2 Cloud Collection 2.3 APIs for developers3 Platform availability 4 Geographical availability 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Microsoft had previously ventured into music services with its Zune brand. The Zune Music Marketplace included 11 million tracks
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Google Play
Google Play (previously Android Market) is a digital distribution service operated and developed by Google. It serves as the official app store for the Android operating system, allowing users to browse and download applications developed with the Android software development kit (SDK) and published through Google. Google Play also serves as a digital media store, offering music, magazines, books, movies, and television programs. It previously offered Google hardware devices for purchase until the introduction of a separate online hardware retailer, Google Store, on March 11, 2015. Applications are available through Google Play either free of charge or at a cost. They can be downloaded directly on an Android device through the Play Store mobile app or by deploying the application to a device from the Google Play website
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Beats Music
Beats Music was a subscription-based online music streaming service owned by the Beats Electronics division of Apple Inc. First developed in 2012 under the name "Daisy", the service combined algorithm-based personalization with expert music suggestions from a variety of sources. The service built upon Beats' existing consumer electronics line, and its 2012 acquisition of the similar service MOG. The service was launched in the United States on January 21, 2014. Beats Music was acquired by Apple Inc. as part of its purchase of Beats Electronics in May 2014. Beats Music was discontinued concurrent with the launch of Apple Music on June 30, 2015. Subscriptions were migrated to the new service
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Album
An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a single item on CD, record, audio tape or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century, first as books of individual 78rpm records, then from 1948 as vinyl LP records played at ​33 1⁄3 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though in the 21st-century album sales have mostly focused on compact disc (CD) and MP3
MP3
formats. However, vinyl sales have been on the rise in recent years.[1] The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s. An album may be recorded in a recording studio (fixed or mobile), in a concert venue, at home, in the field, or a mix of places. The time frame for completely recording an album varies between a few hours and several years. This process usually requires several takes with different parts recorded separately, and then brought or "mixed" together
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Monaural
Monaural or monophonic sound reproduction (often shortened to mono) is sound intended to be heard as if it were emanating from one position. This contrasts with stereophonic sound or stereo, which uses two separate audio channels to reproduce sound from two microphones on the right and left side, which is reproduced with two separate loudspeakers to give a sense of the direction of sound sources. In mono, only one loudspeaker is necessary, but, when played through multiple loudspeakers or headphones, identical signals are fed to each speaker, resulting in the perception of one-channel sound "imaging" in one sonic space between the speakers (provided that the speakers are set up in a proper symmetrical critical-listening placement). Monaural recordings, like stereo ones, typically use multiple microphones fed into multiple channels on a recording console, but each channel is "panned" to the center
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Stereophonic Sound
Stereophonic sound
Stereophonic sound
or, more commonly, stereo, is a method of sound reproduction that creates an illusion of multi-directional audible perspective. This is usually achieved by using two or more independent audio channels through a configuration of two or more loudspeakers (or stereo headphones) in such a way as to create the impression of sound heard from various directions, as in natural hearing.[1] Thus the term "stereophonic" applies to so-called "quadraphonic" and "surround-sound" systems as well as the more common two-channel, two-speaker systems. It is often contrasted with monophonic, or "mono" sound, where audio is heard as coming from one position, often ahead in the sound field (analogous to a visual field). In the 2000s, stereo sound is common in entertainment systems such as broadcast radio, TV, recorded music, and cinema.How stereophonic & duophonic sound systems work
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