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Białowieża
Białowieża
Białowieża
[bʲawɔˈvʲɛʐa] (Belarusian: Белавежа Biełavieža, Lithuanian: Bialovieža, Russian: Беловежская Belovezhskaya) is a village in Poland, in Podlaskie
Podlaskie
Voivodeship, in the middle of Białowieża
Białowieża
Forest, of which it is a namesake. The population of the settlement is 2,000 (2002). It lies approximately 21 kilometres (13 mi) east of Hajnówka
Hajnówka
and 66 km (41 mi) south-east of the regional capital Białystok.Contents1 Geographic location 2 History 3 Sites of interest 4 Notable people 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGeographic location[edit] Białowieża
Białowieża
is in north-eastern Poland
Poland
in the Podlaskie
Podlaskie
Voivodeship near the border with Belarus
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Soviet Partisans
The Soviet partisans
Soviet partisans
were members of resistance movements that fought a guerrilla war against the Axis forces
Axis forces
in the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and the previously Soviet-occupied territories of interwar Poland in 1941–45. The activity emerged after the Nazi German Operation Barbarossa during World War II, and according to Great Soviet Encyclopedia it was coordinated and controlled by the Soviet government and modelled on that of the Red Army. The primary objective of the guerrilla warfare waged by the Soviet partisan units was the disruption of the Eastern Front's German rear, especially road and rail communications
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Polish Language
Polish (język polski, polszczyzna) is a West Slavic language spoken primarily in Poland
Poland
and is the native language of the Poles. It belongs to the Lechitic subgroup of the West Slavic languages.[8] Polish is the official language of Poland, but it is also used throughout the world by Polish minorities in other countries. There are over 55 million Polish language
Polish language
speakers around the world and it is one of the official languages of the European Union. Its written standard is the Polish alphabet, which has 9 additions to the letters of the basic Latin script
Latin script
(ą, ć, ę, ł, ń, ó, ś, ź, ż)
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Białystok
Białystok
Białystok
([bʲaˈwɨstɔk] ( listen); English: /bjɑːˈwɪstɒk/ byah-WIH-stok; Belarusian: Беласток, translit. Belostok, Lithuanian: Balstogė, Russian: Белосток, translit. Belostok, Yiddish: ביאַליסטאָק‎, translit. Byalistok) is the largest city in northeastern Poland
Poland
and the capital of the Podlaskie Voivodeship. Located in the Białystok
Białystok
Uplands of the Podlaskie
Podlaskie
Plain
Plain
on the banks of the Biała River, Białystok
Białystok
ranks second in terms of population density, eleventh in population, and thirteenth in area, of the cities of Poland. It has historically attracted migrants from elsewhere in Poland
Poland
and beyond, particularly from Central and Eastern Europe
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Countries Of The World
This list of sovereign states provides an overview of sovereign states around the world, with information on their status and recognition of their sovereignty. Membership within the United Nations
United Nations
system divides the 206 listed states into three categories: 193 member states,[1] 2 observer states, and 11 other states. The sovereignty dispute column indicates states whose sovereignty is undisputed (191 states) and states whose sovereignty is disputed (15 states, out of which there are 5 member states, 1 observer state and 9 other states). Compiling a list such as this can be a difficult and controversial process, as there is no definition that is binding on all the members of the community of nations concerning the criteria for statehood. For more information on the criteria used to determine the contents of this list, please see the criteria for inclusion section below
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Polish-Soviet War
Polish victoryPeace of RigaTerritorial changes Poland
Poland
re-takes control of present-day western Ukraine
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Władysław Jagiełło
Jogaila
Jogaila
(Lithuanian pronunciation: [joːˈgaːɪˈɫaː] ( listen), later Władysław II Jagiełło
Władysław II Jagiełło
(Polish pronunciation: [vwaˈdɨswaf jaˈɡʲɛwːɔ] ( listen))[nb 1] (c. 1352/1362 – 1 June 1434) was the Grand Duke of Lithuania
Grand Duke of Lithuania
(1377–1434) and then the King of Poland (1386–1434), first alongside his wife Jadwiga until 1399, and then sole King of Poland. He ruled in Lithuania from 1377. Born a pagan, in 1386 he converted to Catholicism and was baptized as Władysław in Kraków, married the young Queen Jadwiga, and was crowned King of Poland
King of Poland
as Władysław II Jagiełło.[1] In 1387 he converted Lithuania to Christianity
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Sigismund I The Old
Sigismund I of Poland
Poland
(Polish: Zygmunt I Stary, Lithuanian: Žygimantas I Senasis; 1 January 1467 – 1 April 1548), of the Jagiellon dynasty, reigned as King of Poland
King of Poland
and also as the Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1506 until 1548. Earlier, Sigismund had been invested as Duke of Silesia. A successful monarch and a great patron of arts, he established Polish suzerainty over Ducal Prussia (East Prussia) and incorporated the duchy of Mazovia into the Polish state, securing the nation's wealth, culture and power. Sigismund I, the fifth son of Casimir IV and Elisabeth of Habsburg, had ruled Głogów, Silesia, since 1499 and became margrave of Lusatia and governor of all Silesia in 1504. In a short time his judicial and administrative reforms transformed those territories into model states. He succeeded his brother Alexander I as grand prince of Lithuania and king of Poland
Poland
in 1506
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Soviet Union
The Soviet Union
Soviet Union
(Russian: Сове́тский Сою́з, tr. Sovétsky Soyúz, IPA: [sɐˈvʲɛt͡skʲɪj sɐˈjus] ( listen)), officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик, tr. Soyúz Sovétskikh Sotsialistícheskikh Respúblik, IPA: [sɐˈjus sɐˈvʲɛtskʲɪx sətsɨəlʲɪsˈtʲitɕɪskʲɪx rʲɪˈspublʲɪk] ( listen)), abbreviated as the USSR (Russian: СССР, tr. SSSR), was a socialist state in Eurasia
Eurasia
that existed from 1922 to 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics,[a] its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow
Moscow
as its capital in its largest republic, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic
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John II Casimir Of Poland
Casimir
Casimir
is an English, French and Latin form of the Polish name Kazimierz.Contents1 Etymology 2 List of variations 3 Royalty 4 People with name Casimir, Kazimir, etc. 5 People with name Kazimierz 6 People with surname Casimir 7 Other 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksEtymology[edit] The name may mean "someone who destroys opponent's prestige/glory during battle", and is derived from the Slavic elements: kaziti "to destroy" and měr "prestige, fame". The latter element is also found in Vladimir, and is cognate to the Germanic and Celtic name element -mer or -mar (e.g. Dietmar) with similar meaning. It is often conflated with the word mir ("peace, world"), thus some sources translate the name as "the one who reveals or establishes peace". Several Polish kings have borne this name, including Casimir
Casimir
III the Great and Saint Casimir, a patron saint of Poland
Poland
and Lithuania
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Iron Ore
Iron
Iron
ores[1] are rocks and minerals from which metallic iron can be economically extracted. The ores are usually rich in iron oxides and vary in colour from dark grey, bright yellow, or deep purple to rusty red. The iron itself is usually found in the form of magnetite (Fe 3O 4, 72.4% Fe), hematite (Fe 2O 3, 69.9% Fe), goethite (FeO(OH), 62.9% Fe), limonite (FeO(OH)·n(H2O), 55% Fe) or siderite (FeCO3, 48.2% Fe). Ores containing very high quantities of hematite or magnetite (greater than about 60% iron) are known as "natural ore" or "direct shipping ore", meaning they can be fed directly into iron-making blast furnaces
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Tar
Tar
Tar
is a dark brown or black viscous liquid of hydrocarbons and free carbon, obtained from a wide variety of organic materials through destructive distillation. Tar
Tar
can be produced from coal, wood, petroleum, or peat.[1] Production and trade in pine-derived tar was a major contributor in the economies of Northern Europe[2] and Colonial America. Its main use was in preserving wooden sailing vessels against rot. The largest user was the Royal Navy. Demand for tar declined with the advent of iron and steel ships. Tar-like products can also be produced from other forms of organic matter, such as peat. Mineral products resembling tar can be produced from fossil hydrocarbons, such as petroleum. Coal
Coal
tar is produced from coal as a byproduct of coke production
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Masovia
Mazovia
Mazovia
(Polish: Mazowsze) is a historical region (dzielnica) in mid-north-eastern Poland. The borders of the Mazovian Voivodeship, which was created in 1999, do not reflect exactly its original shape (they do not include the historically Mazovian Łomża
Łomża
and Łowicz, meanwhile include the Lesser Polish Radom
Radom
and Siedlce), but are roughly similar. Historical Mazovia
Mazovia
existed from the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
until the partitions of Poland
Poland
and consisted of three voivodeships with the capitals in Warszawa, Płock
Płock
and Rawa Mazowiecka
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Russians
Russians
Russians
(Russian: русские, russkiye) are an East Slavic ethnic group native to Eastern Europe. The majority of Russians
Russians
inhabit the nation state of Russia, while notable minorities exist in other former Soviet states such as Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine
Ukraine
and the Baltic states. A large Russian diaspora
Russian diaspora
also exists all over the world, with notable numbers in the United States, Germany, Israel, and Canada. Russians
Russians
are the most numerous ethnic group in Europe. The Russians
Russians
share many cultural traits with their fellow East Slavic counterparts, specifically Belarusians
Belarusians
and Ukrainians. They are predominantly Orthodox Christians
Orthodox Christians
by religion
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