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Bhutanese Enclaves
Bhutan's early history is steeped in mythology and remains obscure. Some of the structures provide evidence that Bhutan
Bhutan
existed as early as 2000 BC. According to a legend it was ruled or controlled by a Cooch-Behar king, Sangaldip, around the 7th century BC,[1] but not much is known prior to the introduction of Tibetan Buddhism
Tibetan Buddhism
in the 9th century, when turmoil in Tibet
Tibet
forced many monks to flee to Bhutan. In the 12th century, the Drukpa Kagyupa school was established and remains the dominant form of Buddhism
Buddhism
in Bhutan
Bhutan
today
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Outline Of South Asian History
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the history of South Asia: History of South Asia
South Asia
South Asia
South Asia

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Parthian Empire
The Parthian Empire
Empire
(/ˈpɑːrθiən/; 247 BC – 224 AD), also known as the Arsacid Empire
Empire
(/ˈɑːrsəsɪd/),[9] was a major Iranian political and cultural power in ancient Iran
Iran
and Iraq.[10] Its latter name comes from Arsaces I of Parthia[11] who, as leader of the Parni
Parni
tribe, founded it in the mid-3rd century BC when he conquered the region of Parthia[12] in Iran's northeast, then a satrapy (province) in rebellion against the Seleucid Empire. Mithridates I of Parthia
Parthia
(r. c. 171–138 BC) greatly expanded the empire by seizing Media and Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
from the Seleucids. At its height, the Parthian Empire
Empire
stretched from the northern reaches of the Euphrates, in what is now central-eastern Turkey, to eastern Iran
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Ror Dynasty
The Ror dynasty (Sindhi: روهڙا راڄ‎) was a power from the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
that ruled modern-day Sindh
Sindh
and northwest India from 450 BC.[1] The Rors ruled from Rori and was built by Dhaj, Ror Kumar, a Ror Kshatriya, in the 5th century BCE. Rori has been known by names such as Roruka and Rorik since antiquity. As capital of the Sauvira Kingdom, Roruka is mentioned as an important trading center in early Buddhist
Buddhist
literature.[2] Buddhist
Buddhist
Jataka
Jataka
stories talk about exchanges of gifts between King Rudrayan of Roruka and King Bimbisara of Magadha.[3] Divyavadana, the Buddhist
Buddhist
chronicle has said that Ror historically competed with Pataliputra
Pataliputra
in terms of political influence.[4] The scholar T.W
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Shishunaga Dynasty
The Shishunaga dynasty is believed to have been the second ruling dynasty of Magadha, an empire of ancient India. According to the Puranas, this dynasty was the second ruling dynasty of Magadha, succeeding the legendary dynasty founded by Brihadratha.[2] Shishunaga, the founder of the dynasty, was initially an amatya or "minister" of the last Haryanka dynasty
Haryanka dynasty
ruler Nāgadāsaka and ascended to the throne after a popular rebellion in c. 413 BCE.[3] The capital of this dynasty initially was Rajgir; but later shifted to Pataliputra, near the present day Patna, during the reign of Kakavarna. According to tradition, Kakavarna was succeeded by his ten sons.[4] This dynasty was succeeded by the Nanda Empire
Nanda Empire
in c
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Nanda Empire
The Nanda dynasty originated from the region of Magadha
Magadha
in ancient India
India
during the 4th century BCE and lasted between 345–321 BCE. At its greatest extent, the empire ruled by the Nanda Dynasty
Nanda Dynasty
extended from Bengal
Bengal
in the east, to the Punjab region
Punjab region
in the west and as far south as the Vindhya Range.[2] The rulers of this dynasty were famed for the great wealth which they accumulated
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Maurya Empire
The Maurya
Maurya
Empire
Empire
was a geographically extensive Iron Age
Iron Age
historical power founded by Chandragupta Maurya
Chandragupta Maurya
which dominated ancient India between 322 BCE and 187 BCE
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Seleucid Empire
The Seleucid Empire
Empire
(/sɪˈljuːsɪd/;[6] Ancient Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Σελευκιδῶν, Basileía tōn Seleukidōn) was a Hellenistic
Hellenistic
state ruled by the Seleucid dynasty, which existed from 312 BC to 63 BC; Seleucus I Nicator
Seleucus I Nicator
founded it following the division of the Macedonian empire vastly expanded by Alexander the Great.[7][8][9][10] Seleucus received Babylonia
Babylonia
(321 BC), and from there, expanded his dominions to include much of Alexander's near-eastern territories
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Pandyan Dynasty
The Pandyan dynasty
Pandyan dynasty
was an ancient Tamil dynasty, one of the three Tamil dynasties, the other two being the Chola
Chola
and the Chera.[3] The kings of the three dynasties were referred to as the Three Crowned Kings of Tamilakam.[4] The Early Pandyans ruled parts of Southern India
Southern India
from at least 4th century BCE. Pandyan rule ended in the first half of the 16th century CE.[5] They initially ruled their country Pandya Nadu
Pandya Nadu
from Korkai, a seaport on the southernmost tip of the Indian Peninsula, and in later times moved to Madurai. Fish being their flag, Pandyas
Pandyas
were experts in water management, agriculture(mostly near river banks) and fisheries and they were eminent sailors and sea traders too. Pandyan was well known since ancient times, with contacts, even diplomatic, reaching the Roman Empire
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Chera Dynasty
Maritime contacts Sangam period Tamilakam Cheras Ays Ezhil Malai Confluence of religions Venad
Venad
- Kingdom of Quilon Calicut Kolattunadu Cochin Minor principalities Portuguese period Dutch period Rise of Travancore Mysorean interlude British Period Battle of Quilon Communism in Kerala Unification of KeralaOther topics Geography Economy Architecture Fortsv t ePart of a series onHistory of Tamil NaduMainTamiḻakam Chronology of Tamil history List of Tamil monarchsSangam periodSources Three Crow
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Chola Dynasty
List of Chola
Chola
kings and emperorsEarly CholasEllalan Kulakkottan Ilamchetchenni Karikala Nedunkilli Nalankilli Killivalavan Kopperuncholan Kochchenganan PerunarkilliInterregnum (c. 200 – c. 848)Medieval CholasVijayalaya 848–891(?)Aditya I 891–907Parantaka I 907–950Gandaraditya 950–957Arinjaya 956–957Sundara (Parantaka II) 957–970Aditya II (co-regent)Uttama 970–985Rajaraja I 985–1014Rajendra I 1012–1044Rajadhiraja 1044–1054Rajendra II 1054–1063Virar
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Pallava Dynasty
The Pallava dynasty
Pallava dynasty
was a South Indian dynasty that existed from 275 CE to 897 CE, ruling a portion of what is today southern India. They gained prominence after the eclipse of the Satavahana dynasty, whom the Pallavas served as feudatories.[2][3] Pallavas became a major power during the reign of Mahendravarman I (571 – 630 CE) and Narasimhavarman I
Narasimhavarman I
(630 – 668 CE) and dominated the Telugu and northern parts of the Tamil region for about 600 years until the end of the 9th century
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Mahameghavahana Dynasty
The Mahameghavahana dynasty
Mahameghavahana dynasty
(Mahā-Mēgha-Vāhana, c. 250s BC to 5th century CE[citation needed]) was an ancient ruling dynasty of Kalinga (modern-day Odisha state) after the decline of the Maurya Empire. The third ruler of the dynasty, Kharavela
Kharavela
is known by his Hathigumpha inscription. Kharavela
Kharavela
patronised Jainism, but did not discriminate against other religions.[1][2] Architecture[edit] Udayagiri and Khandagiri Caves
Udayagiri and Khandagiri Caves
is the most prominent example of Mahameghavahana dynasty
Mahameghavahana dynasty
work. These caves were built in 2nd Century BCE during the rule of King Kharavela. Udayagiri means "Sunrise Hill" and has 18 caves while Khandagiri has 15 caves
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Middle Kingdoms Of India
The Middle kingdoms of India
India
were the political entities in India
India
from the 3rd century BCE to the 13th century CE. The period begins after the decline of the Maurya Empire, and the corresponding rise of the Satavahana
Satavahana
dynasty, beginning with Simuka, from 230 BCE
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Mahajanapada
A Mahājanapada (Sanskrit: महाजनपद, lit. 'great realm', from maha, "great", and janapada "foothold of a tribe, country") was one of the sixteen kingdoms or oligarchic republics that existed in ancient India from the sixth to fourth centuries BCE. Two of them were most probably ganatantras (republics) and others had forms of monarchy
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Satavahana Dynasty
The Satavahanas (IAST: Sātavāhana), also referred to as the Andhras in the Puranas, were an ancient Indian dynasty based in the Deccan region. Most modern scholars believe that the Satavahana
Satavahana
rule began in the first century BCE and lasted until the second century CE, although some assign the beginning of their rule to as early as the 3rd century BCE. The Satavahana
Satavahana
kingdom mainly comprised the present-day Telangana, Andhra Pradesh
Andhra Pradesh
and Maharashtra. At different times, their rule extended to parts of modern Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, and Karnataka. The dynasty had different capital cities at different times, including Pratishthana
Pratishthana
(Paithan) and Amaravati (Dharanikota). The origin of the dynasty is uncertain, but according to the Puranas, their first king overthrew the Kanva dynasty
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