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Belinograph
Wirephoto, telephotography or radiophoto is the sending of pictures by telegraph, telephone or radio. Western Union
Western Union
transmitted its first halftone photograph in 1921. AT&T followed in 1924,[1] and RCA sent a Radiophoto in 1926. The Associated Press
Associated Press
began its Wirephoto
Wirephoto
service in 1935 and held a trademark on the term AP Wirephoto
Wirephoto
between 1963 and 2004. The first AP photo sent by wire depicted the crash of a small plane in New York's Adirondack Mountains.[2] Technologically and commercially, the wirephoto was the successor to Ernest A. Hummel's Telediagraph of 1895, which had transmitted electrically scanned shellac-on-foil originals over a dedicated circuit connecting the New York Herald
New York Herald
and the Chicago Times Herald, the St
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Analogue Electronics
Analogue electronics (also spelled analog electronics) are electronic systems with a continuously variable signal, in contrast to digital electronics where signals usually take only two levels. The term "analogue" describes the proportional relationship between a signal and a voltage or current that represents the signal. The word analogue is derived from the Greek word ανάλογος (analogos) meaning "proportional".[1]Contents1 Analogue signals 2 Inherent noise 3 Analogue vs digital electronics3.1 Noise 3.2 Precision 3.3 Design difficulty4 See also 5 ReferencesAnalogue signals[edit] Main article: Analogue signal An analogue signal uses some attribute of the medium to convey the signal's information. For example, an aneroid barometer uses the angular position of a needle as the signal to convey the information of changes in atmospheric pressure.[2] Electrical signals may represent information by changing their voltage, current, frequency, or total charge
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Alexander Bain (inventor)
Alexander Bain (12 October 1811 – 2 January 1877)[1] was a Scottish inventor and engineer who was first to invent and patent the electric clock. He installed the railway telegraph lines between Edinburgh and Glasgow.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Electric clocks2.1.1 Surviving examples2.2 Facsimile machine 2.3 Chemical telegraph3 Later life 4 Death and legacy 5 References 6 Further reading 7 Patents 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Bain was born in Watten, Caithness, Scotland. His father was a crofter. He had a twin sister, Margaret, and, in total, he had six sisters and six brothers. Bain did not excel in school and was apprenticed to a clockmaker in Wick. Career[edit]Electric clock, Alexander Bain, London, ca. 1845 (Deutsches Uhrenmuseum, Inv
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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International News Service
The International News Service (INS) was a U.S.-based news agency (newswire) founded by newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst
William Randolph Hearst
in 1909.[1]Contents1 History 2 International News Service v. Associated Press 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit] Established two years after Hearst-competitor E.W. Scripps
E.W. Scripps
combined three smaller syndicates under his control into United Press Associations,[2] INS battled the other major newswires. It added a picture service, International News Photos, or INP. The Hearst newsreel series Hearst Metrotone News
Hearst Metrotone News
(1914–1967) was released as International Newsreel
Newsreel
from January 1919 to July 1929
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U.S.
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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Pamphlet
A pamphlet is an unbound booklet (that is, without a hard cover or binding). It may consist of a single sheet of paper that is printed on both sides and folded in half, in thirds, or in fourths, called a leaflet, or it may consist of a few pages that are folded in half and saddle stapled at the crease to make a simple book. For the "International Standardization of Statistics Relating to Book Production and Periodicals", UNESCO
UNESCO
defines a pamphlet as "a non-periodical printed publication of at least 5 but not more than 48 pages, exclusive of the cover pages, published in a particular country and made available to the public" and a book as "a non-periodical printed publication of at least 49 pages, exclusive of the cover pages"
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Empire Of Japan
The Empire of Japan
Japan
(大日本帝國, Dai Nippon Teikoku, literally meaning "Great Japanese Empire")[9] was the historical nation-state[nb 2] and great power that existed from the Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
in 1868 to the enactment of the 1947 constitution of modern Japan.[1] Japan's rapid industrialization and militarization under the slogan Fukoku Kyōhei (富國強兵, "Enrich the Country, Strengthen the Armed Forces") led to its emergence as a world power and the establishment of a colonial empire
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WWII
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Honolulu
Honolulu
Honolulu
(/ˌhɒnəˈluːluː/;[6] Hawaiian: [honoˈlulu]) is the capital and largest city of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Hawaii. It is an unincorporated part of and the county seat of the City and County of Honolulu
Honolulu
on the island of O'ahu.[a] The city is the main gateway to Hawai'i and a major portal into the United States. The city is also a major hub for international business, military defense, as well as famously being host to a diverse variety of east-west and Pacific culture, cuisine, and traditions. Honolulu
Honolulu
is the most remote city of its size in the world[8] and is the westernmost major U.S. city
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Saipan
Saipan
Saipan
/saɪˈpæn/ is the largest island of the Northern Mariana Islands, a commonwealth of the United States
United States
in the western Pacific Ocean. According to the 2010 United States
United States
Census, Saipan's population was 48,220. The Commonwealth's center of government is located in the village of Capitol Hill on the island. Since the entire island is organized as a single municipality, most publications term Saipan
Saipan
as the Commonwealth's capital. The current Mayor of Saipan
Saipan
is David M
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Printing Press
A printing press is a device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink. It marked a dramatic improvement on earlier printing methods in which the cloth, paper or other medium was brushed or rubbed repeatedly to achieve the transfer of ink, and accelerated the process. Typically used for texts, the invention and global spread of the printing press was one of the most influential events in the second millennium.[1][2] Johannes Gutenberg, a goldsmith by profession, developed, circa 1439, a printing system by adapting existing technologies to printing purposes, as well as making inventions of his own. Printing
Printing
in East Asia had been prevalent since the Tang dynasty,[3][4] and in Europe, woodblock printing based on existing screw presses was common by the 14th century
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Frederick Bakewell
Frederick Collier Bakewell (29 September 1800 – 26 September 1869) was an English physicist who improved on the concept of the facsimile machine introduced by Alexander Bain in 1842 and demonstrated a working laboratory version at the 1851 World's Fair in London.Contents1 Biography 2 Image telegraph 3 Other work 4 Books 5 Footnotes 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Wakefield, West Yorkshire, he eventually moved to Hampstead, Middlesex where he lived until his death
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Giovanni Caselli
Father Giovanni Caselli
Giovanni Caselli
(8 June 1815 – 25 April 1891) was an Italian physicist, inventor and priest.[2][3] He is the inventor of the pantelegraph (a.k.a
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Pacific Ocean
The Pacific Ocean
Ocean
is the largest and deepest of Earth's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic Ocean
Arctic Ocean
in the north to the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
(or, depending on definition, to Antarctica) in the south and is bounded by Asia
Asia
and Australia
Australia
in the west and the Americas
Americas
in the east. At 165,250,000 square kilometers (63,800,000 square miles) in area (as defined with an Antarctic
Antarctic
southern border), this largest division of the World Ocean—and, in turn, the hydrosphere—covers about 46% of Earth's water surface and about one-third of its total surface area, making it larger than all of Earth's land area combined.[1] Both the center of the Water Hemisphere and the Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
are in the Pacific Ocean
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Hellschreiber
The Hellschreiber, Feldhellschreiber or Typenbildfeldfernschreiber (also Hell-Schreiber named after its inventor Rudolf Hell) is a facsimile-based teleprinter invented by Rudolf Hell. Compared to contemporary teleprinters that were based on typewriter systems and were mechanically complex and expensive, the Hellschreiber
Hellschreiber
was much simpler and more robust, with only two moving parts. It has the added advantage of being capable of providing intelligible communication even over very poor quality radio or cable links, where voice or other teledata would be unintelligible. The device was first developed in the late 1920s, and saw use starting in the 1930s, chiefly being used for land-line press services. During WW2 it was sometimes used by the German military in conjunction with the Enigma encryption system. In the post-war era, it became increasingly common among newswire services, and was used in this role well into the 1980s
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