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Bay
A bay is a recessed, coastal body of water that directly connects to a larger main body of water, such as an ocean, lake, or another bay.[1][2][3] A large bay is usually called a gulf, sea, sound, or bight. A cove is a type of smaller bay with a circular inlet and narrow entrance. A fjord is a particularly steep bay shaped by glacial activity. Bays can be the estuary of a river, such as the Chesapeake Bay, an estuary of the Susquehanna River.[2] Bays may also be nested within each other; for example, James Bay
James Bay
is an arm of Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
in northeastern Canada. Some large bays, such as the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
and the Hudson Bay, have varied marine geology. The land surrounding a bay often reduces the strength of winds and blocks waves. Bays were significant in the history of human settlement because they provided safe places for fishing
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Plate Tectonics
Plate tectonics
Plate tectonics
(from the Late Latin
Late Latin
tectonicus, from the Greek: τεκτονικός "pertaining to building")[1] is a scientific theory describing the large-scale motion of seven large plates and the movements of a larger number of smaller plates of the Earth's lithosphere, since tectonic processes began on Earth
Earth
between 3 and 3.5 billion years ago. The model builds on the concept of continental drift, an idea developed during the first decades of the 20th century. The geoscientific community accepted plate-tectonic theory after seafloor spreading was validated in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The lithosphere, which is the rigid outermost shell of a planet (the crust and upper mantle), is broken into tectonic plates. The Earth's lithosphere is composed of seven or eight major plates (depending on how they are defined) and many minor plates
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Marine Geology
Marine geology
Marine geology
or geological oceanography is the study of the history and structure of the ocean floor. It involves geophysical, geochemical, sedimentological and paleontological investigations of the ocean floor and coastal zone. Marine geology
Marine geology
has strong ties to geophysics and to physical oceanography. Marine geological studies were of extreme importance in providing the critical evidence for sea floor spreading and plate tectonics in the years following World War II
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Trade
Trade
Trade
involves the transfer of goods or services from one person or entity to another, often in exchange for money. A system or network that allows trade is called a market. The original form of trade, barter, saw the direct exchange of goods and services for other goods and services.[1][need quotation to verify] Barter
Barter
involves trading things without the use of money.[1] Later one bartering party started to involve precious metals, which gained symbolic as well as practical importance. Modern traders generally negotiate through a medium of exchange, such as money. As a result, buying can be separated from selling, or earning. The invention of money (and later credit, paper money and of non-physical money) greatly simplified and promoted trade
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Fishing
Fishing
Fishing
is the activity of trying to catch fish. Fish
Fish
are normally caught in the wild. Techniques for catching fish include hand gathering, spearing, netting, angling and trapping. Fishing
Fishing
may include catching aquatic animals other than fish, such as molluscs, cephalopods, crustaceans, and echinoderms
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Human Settlement
In geography, statistics and archaeology, a settlement, locality or populated place is a community in which people live. A settlement can range in size from a small number of dwellings grouped together to the largest of cities with surrounding urbanized areas. Settlements may include hamlets, villages, towns and cities
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Baja California
^ a. 2010 and later, Baja California
California
is the only state to use the USA DST schedule state wide, while the rest of Mexico
Mexico
(except for small portions of other northern states) starts DST 3–4 weeks later and ends DST one week earlier)[6] ^ b. The state's GDP
GDP
was 294.8 billion of pesos in 2008,[7] amount corresponding to 23.03 billion of dollars, being a dollar worth 12.80 pesos (value of 3 June 2010).[8]Baja California[note 1] (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈbaxa kaliˈfoɾnja] ( listen)), (English: Lower California), officially the Free and Sovereign State of Baja California
California
(Spanish: Estado Libre y Soberano de Baja California), is a state in Mexico. It is the northernmost and westernmost of the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico
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Wave
In physics, a wave is a disturbance that transfers energy through matter or space, with little or no associated mass transport. Waves consist, instead, of oscillations or vibrations of a physical medium or a field, around relatively fixed locations. There are two main types of waves: mechanical and electromagnetic. Mechanical waves propagate through a physical matter, whose substance is being deformed. Restoring forces then reverse the deformation. For example, sound waves propagate via air molecules colliding with their neighbors. When the molecules collide, they also bounce away from each other (a restoring force). This keeps the molecules from continuing to travel in the direction of the wave. Electromagnetic waves
Electromagnetic waves
do not require a medium. Instead, they consist of periodic oscillations of electrical and magnetic fields originally generated by charged particles, and can therefore travel through a vacuum
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Great Capes
In sailing, the great capes are three major capes of the continents in the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
— Africa's Cape of Good Hope, Australia's Cape Leeuwin, and South America's Cape Horn.[1]Contents1 Sailing 2 Five southernmost capes 3 References 4 External linksSailing[edit] The traditional clipper route followed the winds of the roaring forties south of the great capes. Due to the significant hazards they presented to shipping, the great capes became significant landmarks in ocean voyaging.[2] The great capes became common points of reference, though other nearby capes (next section) may have been more southern or shared in notability. Today, the great capes feature prominently in ocean yacht racing, with many races and individual sailors following the clipper route
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Pangaea
Pangaea
Pangaea
or Pangea ( /pænˈdʒiːə/[1]) was a supercontinent that existed during the late Paleozoic
Paleozoic
and early Mesozoic
Mesozoic
eras.[2][3] It assembled from earlier continental units approximately 335 million years ago, and it began to break apart about 175 million years ago.[4] In contrast to the present Earth
Earth
and its distribution of continental mass, much of Pangaea
Pangaea
was in the southern hemisphere and surrounded by a superocean, Panthalassa
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Wind
Wind
Wind
is the flow of gases on a large scale. On the surface of the Earth, wind consists of the bulk movement of air. In outer space, solar wind is the movement of gases or charged particles from the Sun through space, while planetary wind is the outgassing of light chemical elements from a planet's atmosphere into space. Winds are commonly classified by their spatial scale, their speed, the types of forces that cause them, the regions in which they occur, and their effect. The strongest observed winds on a planet in the Solar System occur on Neptune
Neptune
and Saturn. Winds have various aspects, an important one being its velocity (wind speed); another the density of the gas involved; another its energy content or wind energy
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Anchor
An anchor is a device, normally made of metal, used to connect a vessel to the bed of a body of water to prevent the craft from drifting due to wind or current. The word derives from Latin
Latin
ancora, which itself comes from the Greek ἄγκυρα (ankura).[1][2] Anchors can either be temporary or permanent. Permanent anchors are used in the creation of a mooring, and are rarely moved; a specialist service is normally needed to move or maintain them
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Baracoa
Baracoa
Baracoa
is a municipality and city in Guantánamo Province
Guantánamo Province
near the eastern tip of Cuba. It was visited by Admiral Christopher Columbus
Christopher Columbus
on November 27, 1492, and then founded by the first governor of Cuba, the Spanish conquistador Diego Velázquez de Cuéllar
Diego Velázquez de Cuéllar
on August 15, 1511. It is the oldest Spanish settlement in Cuba
Cuba
and was its first capital (the basis for its nickname Ciudad Primada, "First City").Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Economy3.1 Tourism 3.2 Gastronomy4 Demographics 5 Transport5.1 Airport6 Notable residents 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksGeography[edit] Baracoa
Baracoa
is located on the spot where Christopher Columbus
Christopher Columbus
landed in Cuba
Cuba
on his first voyage
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United Nations Convention On The Law Of The Sea
The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea
United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea
(UNCLOS), also called the Law of the Sea Convention or the Law of the Sea treaty, is the international agreement that resulted from the third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS III), which took place between 1973 and 1982. The Law of the Sea Convention defines the rights and responsibilities of nations with respect to their use of the world's oceans, establishing guidelines for businesses, the environment, and the management of marine natural resources. The Convention, concluded in 1982, replaced four 1958 treaties. UNCLOS came into force in 1994, a year after Guyana became the 60th nation to ratify the treaty.[1] As of June 2016[update], 167 countries and the European Union
European Union
have joined in the Convention
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