HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Asbestos
Asbestos
Asbestos
is a set of six naturally occurring silicate minerals,[1] which all have in common their eponymous asbestiform habit: i.e. long (roughly 1:20 aspect ratio), thin fibrous crystals, with each visible fiber composed of millions of microscopic "fibrils" that can be released by abrasion and other processes.[2] They are commonly known by their colors, as blue asbestos, brown asbestos, white asbestos, and green asbestos.[3] Asbestos
Asbestos
mining existed more than 4,000 years ago, but large-scale mining began at the end of the 19th century, when manufacturers and builders began using asbestos for its desirable physical properties.[1] Some of those properties are sound absorption, average tensile strength, affordability, and resistance to fire, heat, and electricity. It was used in such applications as electrical insulation for hotplate wiring and in building insulation
[...More...]

"Asbestos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hydroxide
Hydroxide
Hydroxide
is a diatomic anion with chemical formula OH−. It consists of an oxygen and hydrogen atom held together by a covalent bond, and carries a negative electric charge. It is an important but usually minor constituent of water. It functions as a base, a ligand, a nucleophile and a catalyst. The hydroxide ion forms salts, some of which dissociate in aqueous solution, liberating solvated hydroxide ions. Sodium hydroxide
Sodium hydroxide
is a multi-million-ton per annum commodity chemical. A hydroxide attached to a strongly electropositive center may itself ionize,[citation needed] liberating a hydrogen cation (H+), making the parent compound an acid. The corresponding electrically neutral compound •HO is the hydroxyl radical. The corresponding covalently-bound group –OH of atoms is the hydroxyl group
[...More...]

"Hydroxide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Insurance Industry
Insurance is a means of protection from financial loss. It is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent, uncertain loss. An entity which provides insurance is known as an insurer, insurance company, insurance carrier or underwriter. A person or entity who buys insurance is known as an insured or policyholder. The insurance transaction involves the insured assuming a guaranteed and known relatively small loss in the form of payment to the insurer in exchange for the insurer's promise to compensate the insured in the event of a covered loss. The loss may or may not be financial, but it must be reducible to financial terms, and usually involves something in which the insured has an insurable interest established by ownership, possession, or preexisting relationship. The insured receives a contract, called the insurance policy, which details the conditions and circumstances under which the insurer will compensate the insured
[...More...]

"Insurance Industry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Abrasion (mechanical)
Abrasion is the process of scuffing, scratching, wearing down, marring, or rubbing away. It can be intentionally imposed in a controlled process using an abrasive. Abrasion can be an undesirable effect of exposure to normal use or exposure to the elements.Contents1 In stone shaping 2 Models 3 Abrasion resistance 4 Standards4.1 ASTM 4.2 DIN 4.3 ISO 4.4 JSA5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingIn stone shaping[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Ancient artists, working in stone, used abrasion to create sculptures. The artist selected dense stones like carbonite and emery and rubbed them consistently against comparatively softer stones like limestone and granite
[...More...]

"Abrasion (mechanical)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Absorption (acoustics)
Acoustic absorption refers to the process by which a material, structure, or object takes in sound energy when sound waves are encountered, as opposed to reflecting the energy. Part of the absorbed energy is transformed into heat and part is transmitted through the absorbing body. The energy transformed into heat is said to have been 'lost'. When sound from a loudspeaker collides with the walls of a room part of the sound's energy is reflected, part is transmitted, and part is absorbed into the walls. Just as the acoustic energy was transmitted through the air as pressure differentials (or deformations), the acoustic energy travels through the material which makes up the wall in the same manner. Deformation causes mechanical losses via conversion of part of the sound energy into heat, resulting in acoustic attenuation, mostly due to the wall's viscosity
[...More...]

"Absorption (acoustics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Flame-retardant
The term flame retardants subsumes a diverse group of chemicals which are added to manufactured materials, such as plastics and textiles, and surface finishes and coatings. Flame retardants are activated by the presence of an ignition source and are intended to prevent or slow the further development of ignition by a variety of different physical and chemical methods
[...More...]

"Flame-retardant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Building Insulation
Building insulation
Building insulation
is any object in a building used as insulation for any purpose. While the majority of insulation in buildings is for thermal purposes, the term also applies to acoustic insulation, fire insulation, and impact insulation (e.g. for vibrations caused by industrial applications). Often an insulation material will be chosen for its ability to perform several of these functions at once.Contents1 Thermal insulation 2 Planning2.1 In the USA 2.2 Russia3 Climate3.1 Cold climates 3.2 Hot climates4 Orientation - passive solar design 5 Construction5.1 Building envelope 5.2 Thermal bridge 5.3 Installation6 Materials6.1 Conductive and convective insulators 6.2 Radiant heat barriers 6.3 Eco-friendly insulation7 See also 8 References 9 External linksThermal insulation[edit] Thermal insulation
Thermal insulation
in buildings is an important factor to achieving thermal comfort for its occupants
[...More...]

"Building Insulation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Inhalation
Inhalation
Inhalation
(also known as inspiration) happens when oxygen from the air enters the lungs.Contents1 Inhalation
Inhalation
of air 2 Other substances – accidental 3 Other substances – deliberate3.1 Recreational use 3.2 Medical use3.2.1 Diagnostic 3.2.2 Therapeutic3.3 Suicide4 Mechanism 5 Hyperaeration 6 See also 7 References Inhalation
Inhalation
of air[edit] Inhalation
Inhalation
of air, as part of the cycle of breathing, is a vital process for all human life. As such, it happens automatically (though there are exceptions in some disease states) and does not need conscious control or effort
[...More...]

"Inhalation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Legal Liability
In law, liable means "[r]esponsible or answerable in law; legally obligated."[1] Legal liability concerns both civil law and criminal law and can arise from various areas of law, such as contracts, torts, taxes, or fines given by government agencies. The claimant is the one who seeks to establish, or prove, liability. Claimants can prove liability through a myriad of different theories, known as theories of liability. Which theories of liability are available in a given case depends on nature of the law in question
[...More...]

"Legal Liability" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
Greece
was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the Byzantine
Byzantine
era.[1] Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse
Late Bronze Age collapse
of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the period of Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin. This was followed by the period of Classical Greece, an era that began with the Greco-Persian Wars, lasting from the 5th to 4th centuries BC
[...More...]

"Ancient Greece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aspect Ratio
The aspect ratio of a geometric shape is the ratio of its sizes in different dimensions. For example, the aspect ratio of a rectangle is the ratio of its longer side to its shorter side – the ratio of width to height,[1] when the rectangle is oriented as a "landscape". The aspect ratio is most often expressed as two numbers separated by a colon (x:y), less commonly as a simple or decimal fraction. The values x and y do not represent actual widths and heights but, rather, the relationship between width and height
[...More...]

"Aspect Ratio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Environmental Protection Agency
The United States
United States
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or sometimes U.S. EPA) is an agency of the federal government of the United States which was created for the purpose of protecting human health and the environment by writing and enforcing regulations based on laws passed by Congress.[2] President Richard Nixon
Richard Nixon
proposed the establishment of EPA and it began operation on December 2, 1970, after Nixon signed an executive order. The order establishing the EPA was ratified by committee hearings in the House and Senate. The agency is led by its Administrator, who is appointed by the President and approved by Congress. The current Administrator is Scott Pruitt
[...More...]

"United States Environmental Protection Agency" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

CAS Registry Number
A CAS Registry Number,[1] also referred to as CASRN or CAS Number, is a unique numerical identifier assigned by the Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) to every chemical substance described in the open scientific literature (currently including all substances described from 1957 through the present, plus some substances from the early or mid 1900s), including organic and inorganic compounds, minerals, isotopes, alloys and nonstructurable materials (UVCBs, of unknown, variable composition, or biological origin).[2] The Registry maintained by CAS is an authoritative collection of disclosed chemical substance information. It currently identifies more than 129 million organic and inorganic substances and 67 million protein and DNA sequences,[3] plus additional information about each substance
[...More...]

"CAS Registry Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Serpentinite
Serpentinite
Serpentinite
is a rock composed of one or more serpentine group minerals, the name originating from the similarity of the texture of the rock to that of the skin of a snake.[1] Minerals in this group are formed by serpentinization, a hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle
[...More...]

"Serpentinite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chemical Formula
A chemical formula is a way of information about the chemical proportions of atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound or molecule, using chemical element symbols, numbers, and sometimes also other symbols, such as parentheses, dashes, brackets, commas and plus (+) and minus (−) signs. These are limited to a single typographic line of symbols, which may include subscripts and superscripts. A chemical formula is not a chemical name, and it contains no words. Although a chemical formula may imply certain simple chemical structures, it is not the same as a full chemical structural formula. Chemical formulas can fully specify the structure of only the simplest of molecules and chemical substances, and are generally more limited in power than are chemical names and structural formulas. The simplest types of chemical formulas are called empirical formulas, which use letters and numbers indicating the numerical proportions of atoms of each type
[...More...]

"Chemical Formula" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Magnesium
Magnesium
Magnesium
is a chemical element with symbol Mg and atomic number 12. It is a shiny gray solid which bears a close physical resemblance to the other five elements in the second column (group 2, or alkaline earth metals) of the periodic table: all group 2 elements have the same electron configuration in the outer electron shell and a similar crystal structure. Magnesium
Magnesium
is the ninth most abundant element in the universe.[4][5] It is produced in large, aging stars from the sequential addition of three helium nuclei to a carbon nucleus. When such stars explode as supernovas, much of the magnesium is expelled into the interstellar medium where it may recycle into new star systems
[...More...]

"Magnesium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.