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Aldermen
An alderman is a member of a municipal assembly or council in many jurisdictions founded upon English law
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City Commission
City commission government is a form of local government in the United States. In a city commission government, voters elect a small commission, typically of five to seven members, on a plurality-at-large voting basis. These commissioners constitute the legislative body of the city and, as a group, are responsible for taxation, appropriations, ordinances, and other general functions. Individual commissioners are also assigned executive responsibility for a specific aspect of municipal affairs, such as public works, finance, or public safety. This form of government thus blends legislative and executive branch functions in the same body. One commissioner may be designated to function as chairman or mayor, but this largely is a procedural, honorific, or ceremonial designation and typically does not involve additional powers beyond that exercised by the other commissioners
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London Borough Councils
The London
London
boroughs are 32 of the 33 local authority districts of the Greater London
Greater London
administrative area (the 33rd is the City of London) and are each governed by a London
London
borough council. The London
London
boroughs were all created at the same time as Greater London
Greater London
on 1 April 1965 by the London Government Act 1963
London Government Act 1963
and are a type of local government district. Twelve were designated as Inner London
Inner London
boroughs and twenty as Outer London boroughs. The London
London
boroughs have populations of around 150,000 to 300,000. Inner London
Inner London
boroughs tend to be smaller, in both population and area, and more densely populated than Outer London boroughs
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Rural District
Rural
Rural
districts were a type of local government area – now superseded – established at the end of the 19th century in England, Wales, and Ireland
Ireland
for the administration of predominantly rural areas at a level lower than that of the administrative counties.Contents1 England
England
and Wales 2 Ireland 3 References England
England
and Wales[edit] In England and Wales
England and Wales
they were created in 1894 (by the Local Government Act 1894) along with urban districts. They replaced the earlier system of sanitary districts (themselves based on poor law unions, but not replacing them). Rural
Rural
districts had elected rural district councils (RDCs), which inherited the functions of the earlier sanitary districts, but also had wider authority over matters such as local planning, council housing, and playgrounds and cemeteries
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Urban District (Great Britain And Ireland)
A district is a type of administrative division that, in some countries, is managed by local government
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Baillie
A bailie or baillie is a civic officer in the local government of Scotland. The position arose in the burghs, where bailies formerly held a post similar to that of an alderman or magistrate (see bailiff). Modern bailies exist in Scottish local councils, with the position being a courtesy title and appointees often requested to provide support to the Lord Provost
Lord Provost
or Provost - the ceremonial and civic head of the council - in their various engagements.[1][2]Contents1 History 2 Use 3 Notable Scottish bailies3.1 As a title 3.2 As a surname4 Outwith government 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The name derives from Old French
Old French
and used to be synonymous with Provost, with several officials holding this role often at the appointment of the Church.[3] The jurisdiction of a bailie is called a bailiary (alt
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor
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Chicago
Chicago
Chicago
(/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ, -ˈkɔː-/ ( listen)), officially the City
City
of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States. With over 2.7 million residents, it is also the most populous city in both the state of Illinois
Illinois
and the Midwestern United States. It is the county seat of Cook County
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Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
(/ˌpɛnsəlˈveɪniə/ (listen) PEN-səl-VAY-nee-ə), officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the Northeastern, Great Lakes, and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware
Delaware
to the southeast, Maryland
Maryland
to the south, West Virginia
West Virginia
to the southwest, Ohio
Ohio
to the west, Lake Erie
Lake Erie
and the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey
New Jersey
to the east. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
is the 33rd-largest state by area, and the 5th-most populous state according to the most recent official U.S. Census count in 2010
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Danny Solis
Daniel "Danny" Solis is a politician who serves as the alderman of the 25th Ward of the City of Chicago
Chicago
which includes the Lower West Side. He was appointed by Mayor Richard M. Daley
Richard M. Daley
in 1996. He is the brother of Patti Solis Doyle, Senator Hillary Clinton's former campaign manager. Solis was a member of Clinton's Illinois
Illinois
Steering Committee.[1]Contents1 Public service 2 Aldermanic career 3 References 4 External linksPublic service[edit] Solis began his career as a school teacher. He was the founder and Executive Director of Latino Youth High School
Latino Youth High School
as well as the Executive Director of the Pilsen Neighbors Community Council
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Local Government Act 1972
The Local Government Act 1972
Local Government Act 1972
(c
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Local Government In Canada
Provincial and territorial executive councilsPremiersLegislative (Queen-in-Parliament) Federal parliamentSenateSpeaker of the Senate Government Leader in the Senate Opposition Leader in the Senate Senate divisionsHouse of CommonsSpeaker of the house Government Leader in the house Opposition Leader in the house Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition Leader of the Opposition Shadow cabinetProvincial and territorial parliamentsJudicial (Queen-on-the-Bench) Court systemSupreme courtFederal chief justice (Richard Wagner)Provincial and territorial courtsProvincial chief justicesConstitutionBritish North America Acts Peace, order, and good government Charter of Rights and FreedomsElectionsFederal electoral districts Federal electoral system 42nd federal election (2015) Provincial electoral districts Politics of the provincesLocal government Municipal governmentRelated topics
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Local Government In The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Mayor
In many countries, a mayor (from the Latin
Latin
maior [majˈjɔr], meaning "bigger") is the highest-ranking official in a municipal government such as that of a city or a town. Worldwide, there is a wide variance in local laws and customs regarding the powers and responsibilities of a mayor as well as the means by which a mayor is elected or otherwise mandated. Depending on the system chosen, a mayor may be the chief executive officer of the municipal government, may simply chair a multi-member governing body with little or no independent power, or may play a solely ceremonial role
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Selectman
The board of selectmen is commonly the executive arm of the government of New England towns in the United States. The board typically consists of three or five members, with or without staggered terms. Three is the most common number, historically.[1] A first selectman is appointed to head the board, often by election.Contents1 History 2 Present 3 First selectman 4 See also 5 References 6 NotesHistory[edit] In most New England towns, the adult voting population gathered annually in a town meeting to act as the local legislature, approving budgets and laws
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