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Gheg Albanian

Gheg Albanian (also spelled Geg Albanian; Gheg Albanian: gegnisht, Standard Albanian: gegë or gegërisht) is one of the two major varieties of Albanian. The other is Tosk on which Standard Albanian is based. The geographic dividing line between the two varieties is the Shkumbin River, which winds its way through central Albania.[8][9] Gheg is spoken in Northern Albania, Kosovo, northwestern North Macedonia, southeastern Gheg Albanian (also spelled Geg Albanian; Gheg Albanian: gegnisht, Standard Albanian: gegë or gegërisht) is one of the two major varieties of Albanian. The other is Tosk on which Standard Albanian is based
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Lab Albanian Dialect
The Lab Albanian dialect (Albanian: Labërishtja or Dialekti lab) is a Tosk Albanian dialect associated with the wider definition of the ethnographic region of Labëria, spoken by Lab Albanians. Under this wider definition of Labëria, Lab Albanian stretches from Vlorë and Mallakastër south and east up to Gjirokastër, Lunxhëria and Sarandë. Notable aspects of Lab in Albanian and wider Balkan areal linguistics include its peculiar mix of conservative and innovative features, the lack (in some varieties) of typical Albanian Balkanisms like the admirative[1], and the presence of features typical of Northern Gheg dialects despite it being a Southern dialect. Labërishtja is a subdivision of the Southern Tosk group, which is itself a subdivision of Tosk Albanian, the collection of Albanian dialects south of the Shkumbin River
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Tosk Albanian
Tosk Albanian (Albanian: toskë or toskërisht) is the southern group of varieties of the Albanian language, spoken by the ethnographic group known as Tosks. The line of demarcation between Tosk and Gheg (the northern variety) is the Shkumbin River. Tosk is the basis of the standard Albanian language. Major Tosk-speaking groups include the Myzeqars of Myzeqe, Labs of Labëria, Chams of Çamëria, Arvanites of Greece and the Arbëreshë of Italy, as well as the original inhabitants of Mandritsa in Bulgaria
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Arvanitic

Arvanitika (/ˌɑːrvəˈnɪtɪkə/;[5] Arvanitika: αρbε̰ρίσ̈τ, romanized: Arvanitika (/ˌɑːrvəˈnɪtɪkə/;[5] Arvanitika: αρbε̰ρίσ̈τ, romanized: arbërisht; Greek: αρβανίτικα, romanized: arvanítika), also known as Arvanitic, is the variety of Albanian traditionally spoken by the Arvanites, a population group in Greece
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Kosovan Cuisine
The Kosovan cuisine (Albanian: Kuzhina Kosovare) is a representative of the cuisine of the Balkans and consists of traditional dishes by ethnic groups native to Kosovo.[a] Due to historical and ethnic connections with Albania, it has been significantly influenced by Albanian cuisine and has adopted elements of other Balkan countries. Bread, dairy, meat, fruits and vegetables are important staples in Kosovan cuisine. With diversity of recipes, the Kosovan daily cuisine adjusts well to the country's occasional hot summers and the frequent long winters
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Cannoli
Cannoli (Italian pronunciation: [kanˈnɔːli]; Sicilian: cannolu) are Italian pastries consisting of tube-shaped shells of fried pastry dough, filled with a sweet, creamy filling usually containing ricotta—a staple of Sicilian cuisine.[1][2] They range in size from 3.5 inches (8.9 cm) to 7.5 inches (19 cm). In mainland Italy, they are commonly known as cannoli siciliani (Sicilian cannoli). Cannolo is a diminutive of canna, 'cane' or 'tube'.[3] In Italian, cannoli is grammatically plural; the corresponding singular is cannolo ([kanˈnɔːlo], Sicilian: cannolu), meaning "little tube"
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Arvanitika

Arvanitika (/ˌɑːrvəˈnɪtɪkə/;<Arvanitika (/ˌɑːrvəˈnɪtɪkə/;[5] Arvanitika: αρbε̰ρίσ̈τ, romanized: arbërisht; Greek: αρβανίτικα, romanized: arvanítika), also known as Arvanitic, is the variety of Albanian traditionally spoken by the Arvanites, a population group in Greece
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Summer Festival, Albania

Dita e Verës[1] English: The Summer's Day) is an Albanian holiday, which has its roots in Pagan tradition. It is celebrated on the 14th of March of the Gregorian Calendar nowadays, which means that its original date was the 1st of March of the Julian Calendar. From the antiquity, this holiday has been a spring festival and its purpose is to celebrate the beginning of the Spring Equinox or of the New Year and mark the end of winter. Back then, the solar calendar consisted only on two seasons summer and winter, where summer would start in March and winter in September. This day became a national holiday in 2004. Its origins are near the city of Elbasan, but for many years it has become a tradition in all around Albania. However, the residents in the city of Elbasan would usually follow a more specific ritual in celebrating this holiday
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