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Agira
Agira
Agira
(Italian pronunciation: [aˈdʒiːra]; Sicilian: Aggira) is a town and comune in the province of Enna, Sicily
Sicily
(southern Italy). It is located in the mid-valley of the River Salso, 35 kilometres (22 miles) from Enna
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Capetian House Of Anjou
The Capetian House of Anjou
Anjou
was a royal house and cadet branch of the direct French House of Capet, part of the Capetian dynasty. It is one of three separate royal houses referred to as Angevin, meaning "from Anjou" in France. Founded by Charles I of Naples, the youngest son of Louis VIII of France, the Capetian king first ruled the Kingdom of Sicily
Sicily
during the 13th century. Later the War of the Sicilian Vespers forced him out of the island of Sicily, leaving him with the southern half of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
— the Kingdom of Naples
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Timoleon
Timoleon
Timoleon
(Greek: Τιμολέων), son of Timodemus, of Corinth
Corinth
(c. 411–337 BC) was a Greek statesman and general. As the champion of Greece
Greece
against Carthage he is closely connected with the history of Sicily, especially Syracuse.Contents1 Early life 2 Sicily 3 Ruler of Syracuse 4 Retirement 5 Tyrant or democrat? 6 Notes 7 Sources7.1 Primary sources 7.2 Secondary sources8 Further readingEarly life[edit] In the mid 360s BC, Timophanes, the brother of Timoleon
Timoleon
took possession of the acropolis of Corinth
Corinth
and effectively made himself tyrant of the city
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Trapani
Trapani
Trapani
[ˈtraːpani]  listen (help·info) (Sicilian: Tràpani; Latin: Drepanon, Greek: Δρέπανον) is a city and comune on the west coast of Sicily
Sicily
in Italy. It is the capital of the Province of Trapani. Founded by Elymians, the city is still an important fishing port and the main gateway to the nearby Egadi Islands.Contents1 History 2 Administration and demographics 3 Economy 4 Main sights 5 Culture 6 Transport 7 Sport 8 Climate 9 International relations9.1 Twin towns and Sister cities10 Gallery 11 See also 12 References 13 Bibliography 14 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Timeline of Trapani Trapani
Trapani
was founded by the Elymians
Elymians
to serve as the port of the nearby city of Erice
Erice
(ancient Eryx), which overlooks it from Monte San Giuliano
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Eucalyptus
Aromadendron Andrews ex Steud. Eucalypton St.-Lag. Eudesmia R.Br. Symphyomyrtus Schauer Eucalyptus
Eucalyptus
/ˌjuːkəˈlɪptəs/[2] L'Héritier 1789[3] (plural eucalypti, eucalyptuses or eucalypts) is a diverse genus of flowering trees and shrubs (including a distinct group with a multiple-stem mallee growth habit) in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae. Members of the genus dominate the tree flora of Australia, and include Eucalyptus regnans, the tallest known flowering plant on Earth.[4] There are more than 700 species of eucalyptus and most are native to Australia; a very small number are found in adjacent areas of New Guinea
New Guinea
and Indonesia. One species, Eucalyptus
Eucalyptus
deglupta, ranges as far north as the Philippines. Of the 15 species found outside Australia, just nine are exclusively non-Australian
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Erean Mountains
The Erean Mountains (Italian: Monti Erei) are a mountain chain in central Sicily, southern Italy, mostly located in the central and northern areas of the province of Enna. The highest peak is the Monte Altesina, at 1,192 m above sea level. Description[edit] The Erean Mountains are of limestone origin, and do not reach high altitudes. Their area was once one of the most important in the world for the production of sulphur, as testified today by numerous mineral quarries, the largest being that of Floristella-Grottacalda. There are several lakes in the mountain group, such as Pergusa Lake, whose rich bird life has given it the status of being the first special Natural Reserve in Sicily, and Pozzillo Lake, the largest artificial basin on the island. Due to the rugged landscape, the population totals less than 200,000 and thus the area's population density is lower
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Ancient Greek Language
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Tyrant
A tyrant (Greek τύραννος, tyrannos), in the modern English usage of the word, is an absolute ruler unrestrained by law or person, or one who has usurped legitimate sovereignty. Often described as a cruel character, a tyrant defends his position by oppressive means, tending to control almost everything in the state.[1][2] The original Greek term, however, merely meant an authoritarian sovereign without reference to character,[3] bearing no pejorative connotation during the Archaic and early Classical periods
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Dionysius I Of Syracuse
Dionysius I or Dionysius the Elder (Greek: Διονύσιος ὁ Πρεσβύτερος; c. 432 – 367 BC) was a Greek tyrant of Syracuse, in what is now Sicily, southern Italy. He conquered several cities in Sicily
Sicily
and southern Italy, opposed Carthage's influence in Sicily
Sicily
and made Syracuse the most powerful of the Western Greek colonies
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Carthage
Carthage
Carthage
(/ˈkɑːrθɪdʒ/, from Latin: Carthago; Phoenician: Qart-ḥadašt ("New city")) was the center or capital city of the ancient Carthaginian civilization, on the eastern side of the Lake of Tunis
Tunis
in what is now the Tunis Governorate
Tunis Governorate
in Tunisia. The city developed from a Phoenician colony into the capital of an empire dominating the Mediterranean during the first millennium BC.[1] The legendary Queen Dido
Dido
is regarded as the founder of the city, though her historicity has been questioned. According to accounts by Timaeus of Tauromenium, she purchased from a local tribe the amount of land that could be covered by an oxhide
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Greek People
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze
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Corinth
Corinth
Corinth
(/ˈkɒrɪnθ/; Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos, pronounced [ˈkorinθos] ( listen)) is an ancient city and former municipality in Corinthia, Peloponnese, which is located in south-central Greece
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Heracles
Heracles
Heracles
(/ˈhɛrəkliːz/ HERR-ə-kleez; Greek: Ἡρακλῆς, Hēraklēs, from Hēra, "Hera"), born Alcaeus[1] (Ἀλκαῖος, Alkaios) or Alcides[2] (Ἀλκείδης, Alkeidēs), was a divine hero in Greek mythology, the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Alcmene, foster son of Amphitryon[3] and great-grandson and half-brother (as they are both sired by the god Zeus) of Perseus. He was the greatest of the Greek heroes, a paragon of masculinity, the ancestor of royal clans who claimed to be Heracleidae
Heracleidae
(Ἡρακλεῖδαι), and a champion of the Olympian order against chthonic monsters. In Rome and the modern West, he is known as Hercules, with whom the later Roman emperors, in particular Commodus
Commodus
and Maximian, often identified themselves
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Comune
The comune (IPA: [koˈmune]; plural: comuni, IPA: [koˈmuni]) is a basic administrative division in Italy, roughly equivalent to a township or municipality.Contents1 Importance and function 2 Subdivisions 3 Homonymy 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksImportance and function[edit] The comune provides many of the basic civil functions: registry of births and deaths, registry of deeds, and contracting for local roads and public works. It is headed by a mayor (sindaco) assisted by a legislative body, the consiglio comunale (communal council), and an executive body, the giunta comunale (communal committee). The mayor and members of the consiglio comunale are elected together by resident citizens: the coalition of the elected mayor (who needs an absolute majority in the first or second round of voting) gains three fifths of the consiglio's seats
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Temenos
Temenos (Greek: τέμενος; plural: τεμένη, temene)[1] is a piece of land cut off and assigned as an official domain, especially to kings and chiefs, or a piece of land marked off from common uses and dedicated to a god, a sanctuary, holy grove or holy precinct: the Pythian race-course is called a temenos, the sacred valley of the Nile is the Νείλοιο πῖον τέμενος Κρονίδα ("the rich temenos of Cronides
Cronides
by the Nile"),[1][2] the Acropolis of Athens is the ἱερὸν τέμενος ("the holy temenos"; of Pallas).[1][3] The word derives from the Greek verb τέμνω (temnō), "to cut".[4][5] The earliest attested form of the word is the Mycenaean Greek
Mycenaean Greek
𐀳𐀕𐀜, te-me-no, written in Linear B syllabic script.[6] The concept of temenos arose in classical Mediterranean
Mediterranean
cultures as an area reserved for worship of the gods
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Iolaus
In Greek mythology, Iolaus
Iolaus
(/aɪˈoʊlaʊs/; Greek: Ἰόλαος Iólaos) was a Theban divine hero, son of Iphicles and Automedusa. He was famed for being Heracles' nephew and for helping with some of his Labors, and also for being one of the Argonauts. Through his daughter Leipephilene, he was considered to have fathered the mythic and historic line of the kings of Corinth, ending with Telestes. A genus of Lycaenid butterfly has been named after him.Contents1 Relationship with Heracles 2 See also 3 Notes 4 External linksRelationship with Heracles[edit]Repoussé and engraved relief of Hercules (right), Eros
Eros
(center) and Iolaus
Iolaus
(left) on the Ficoroni cista. 4th century BC Etruscan ritual vesselAs a son of Iphicles, Iolaus
Iolaus
was a nephew of Heracles. He often acted as Heracles' charioteer and companion
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