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Adomnán
Adomnán
Adomnán
or Adamnán of Iona
Iona
(/æðɒvˈnɔːn/, Latin: Adamnanus, Adomnanus; c. 624  – 704), also known as Eunan (from Irish Naomh Ádhamhnán), was an abbot of Iona
Iona
Abbey (r. 679–704), hagiographer, statesman, canon jurist, and saint
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Ségéne Of Iona
Saint Ségéne (also called Segein, Segeni, Segeno, Seghene, Segin, Segine, Ségíne, Segineus, Segini, Seighin) b. c. 610 - d. 24 May 688, was the Bishop of Armagh, Ireland from 661 to 24 May 688.Contents1 Genealogy and Birth 2 Priesthood 3 Bishop of Armagh 4 Death 5 Feast Day 6 ReferencesGenealogy and Birth[edit] St. Ségéne was from Achad Chlaidib (Field of the Sword), possibly the modern townland of Aghnacloy, Barony of Oneilland East, County Armagh. His father’s name was Bresal [1] Priesthood[edit] At this time the Irish Church was preoccupied with the Paschal cycle Question, i.e. how to compute the date of Easter and Christ’s death. The southern part of Ireland accepted the Dionysian computation - which was now being used at Rome - at the Synod of Magh Lene in 630 A.D. However the Northern clergy were followers of the method proposed by Iona and its affiliate churches, known as the Irish Computation
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Constantinople
Κωνσταντινούπολις (in Greek) Constantinopolis (in Latin)Map of ConstantinopleShown within Asia
Asia
MinorAlternate name Byzantion (earlier Greek name), Miklagard/Miklagarth (Old Norse), Tsarigrad (Slavic), Basileuousa ("Queen of Cities"), Megalopolis ("the Great City")Location Istanbul, Istanbul
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Gaels
The Gaels
Gaels
(Irish pronunciation: [ɡeːlˠ], Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [kɛː.əlˠ]; Irish: Na Gaeil, Scottish Gaelic: Na Gàidheil, Manx: Ny Gaeil) are an ethnolinguistic group native to northwestern Europe.[a] They are associated with the Gaelic languages: a branch of the Celtic languages
Celtic languages
comprising Irish, Manx and Scottish Gaelic. Historically, the ethnonyms Irish and Scots referred to the Gaels
Gaels
in general, but the scope of those nationalities is today more complex. Gaelic language
Gaelic language
and culture originated in Ireland, extending to Dál Riata in western Scotland. In antiquity the Gaels
Gaels
traded with the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and also raided Roman Britain. In the Middle Ages, Gaelic culture became dominant throughout the rest of Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man
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Kings Of Brega
The Kings of Brega were rulers of Brega, a petty kingdom north of Dublin
Dublin
in medieval Ireland.Contents1 Overview 2 Kings of Cnogba/Knowth 3 Kings of Lagore/Deiscert Breg (South Brega) 4 Notes 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] Brega took its name from Magh Breagh (Breá), meaning "fine plain", in modern County Meath, County Louth
County Louth
and County Dublin, Ireland. They formed part of the Uí Néill kindred, belonging to the Síl nÁedo Sláine branch of the southern Uí Néill. The kingdom of Brega included the Hill of Tara, the site where the High King of Ireland
High King of Ireland
was proclaimed. Brega was bounded on the east by the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
and on the south by the River Liffey. It extended northwards across the River Boyne to the foothills of County Louth
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Easter
Easter,[nb 1] also called Pascha (Greek, Latin)[nb 2] or Resurrection Sunday,[3][4] is a festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
from the dead, described in the New Testament
New Testament
as having occurred on the third day of his burial after his crucifixion by the Romans at Calvary
Calvary
c
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Kingdom Of Northumbria
The Kingdom of Northumbria (/nɔːrˈθʌmbriə/; Old English: Norþanhymbra rīce[1]) was a medieval Anglian kingdom in what is now northern England and south-east Scotland. The name derives from the Old English Norþan-hymbre meaning "the people or province north of the Humber,"[2] which reflects the approximate southern limit to the kingdom's territory, the Humber Estuary. Northumbria started to consolidate into one kingdom in the early seventh century. At its height, the kingdom extended from just south of the Humber to the River Mersey and to the Firth of Forth, in Scotland. Northumbria ceased to be an independent kingdom in the mid-tenth century. Northumbria is also used in the names of some North East regional institutions, particularly the police force (Northumbria Police, which covers Northumberland and Tyne and Wear), a university (Northumbria University) based in Newcastle upon Tyne and Northumbria Army Cadet Force, as well as the regionalist Northumbrian Association[3]
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Ecgfrith Of Northumbria
Ecgfrith (c. 645 – 20 May 685) was the King of Deira
Deira
from 664 until 670, and then King of Northumbria
King of Northumbria
from 670 until his death in 685. He ruled over Northumbria when it was at the height of its power, but his reign ended with a disastrous defeat at the Battle of Nechtansmere
Battle of Nechtansmere
in which he lost his life.Contents1 Early life 2 King of Northumbria 3 Coinage 4 Citations 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Ecgfrith was born in 645 to king Oswiu
Oswiu
and Eanflæd his queen. At about the age of 10 Ecgfrith was held as a hostage at the court of Queen Cynewise after her husband king Penda of Mercia
Penda of Mercia
invaded Northumbria in 655
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Synod Of Whitby
The Synod
Synod
of Whitby
Whitby
(664 A.D.) was a Northumbrian synod where King Oswiu of Northumbria
Northumbria
ruled that his kingdom would calculate Easter
Easter
and observe the monastic tonsure according to the customs of Rome, rather than the customs practised by Irish monks at Iona
Iona
and its satellite institutions. The synod was summoned at Hilda's double monastery of Streonshalh (Streanæshalch), later called Whitby
Whitby
Abbey.Contents1 Sources 2 Background 3 Convocation 4 Decision 5 Outcome 6 Legacy and historical significance 7 See also 8 Notes 9 Bibliography9.1 Primary sources 9.2 Secondary sources10 External linksSources[edit]A manuscript of Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum.There are two principal sources for the synod
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Early Middle Ages
The Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
or Early Medieval Period, typically regarded as lasting from the 6th century
6th century
to the 10th century
10th century
CE, marked the start of the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
of European history. The Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
followed the decline of the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
and preceded the High Middle Ages (c. 10th to 13th centuries). The Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
overlap with Late Antiquity. The term "Late Antiquity" is used to emphasize elements of continuity with the Roman Empire, while "Early Middle Ages" is used to emphasize developments characteristic of the later medieval period. The period saw a continuation of trends begun during late classical antiquity, including population decline, especially in urban centres, a decline of trade, and increased immigration
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Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
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Irish People
Irish Travellers, Anglo-Irish, Bretons, Cornish, English, Icelanders,[12] Manx, Norse, Scots, Ulster
Ulster
Scots, Welsh Other Northern European
Northern European
ethnic groups* Around 800,000 people born in
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Franks
The Franks
Franks
(Latin: Franci or Latin: gens Francorum) were a collection of Germanic peoples, whose name was first mentioned in 3rd century Roman sources, associated with tribes on the Lower and Middle Rhine
Middle Rhine
in the 3rd century AD, on the edge of the Roman Empire. Later the term is associated with Romanized Germanic dynasties within the collapsing Roman Empire, who eventually commanded the whole region between the rivers Loire
Loire
and Rhine, and imposed power over many other post-Roman kingdoms and Germanic peoples, later being recognized by the Catholic church as successors to the old rulers of the Western Roman Empire.[1][2][3][a] Although the Frankish name only appears in the 3rd century, at least some of the original Frankish tribes had long been known under their own names to the Romans, both as allies providing soldiers, and as enemies
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Ulster
Patron Saints: Finnian of Moville[1] Columba a. ^ The Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency[2] for 2011 combined with the preliminary results of Census of Ireland 2011 for Ulster (part of).[3] b. ^ Ulster contains all of the Northern Ireland constituency (3 MEPs) as well as part of the Midlands–North-West constituency (4 MEPs); the counties of Cavan, Monaghan and Donegal contain 17.5% of the population of this constituency.[4]Ulster (/ˈʌlstər/; Irish: Ulaidh pronounced [ˈul̪ˠəi] or Cúige Uladh pronounced [ˈkuːɟə ˈul̪ˠə], Ulster Scots: Ulstèr[5][6][7] or Ulster)[8][9][10] is a former province in the north of the island of Ireland. It was made up of nine counties, six of which are in Northern Ireland (a part of the United Kingdom) and three of which are in the Republic of Ireland. It is the second largest (after Munster) and second most populous (after Leinster) of Ireland's four provinces, with Belfast being its biggest city
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Raphoe
Raphoe
Raphoe
(/ˈræfoʊ/; Irish: Ráth Bhoth) is a town in County Donegal in Ulster, Ireland. It is the main town in the fertile district of East Donegal
Donegal
known as the Laggan, as well as giving its name to the Barony of Raphoe
Raphoe
and also as to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Raphoe and the Church of Ireland
Ireland
(or Anglican) Diocese of Derry
Derry
and Raphoe. The Burn Deele (Irish: An Daoil; also spelled in English as the Burn Dale) is a burn (a small river) that flows a short distance to the south of Raphoe
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Egypt
Coordinates: 26°N 30°E / 26°N 30°E / 26; 30Arab Republic
Republic
of Egyptجمهورية مصر العربيةArabic: Jumhūrīyat Miṣr al-ʿArabīyahEgyptian: Gomhoreyet Maṣr El ʿArabeyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Bilady, Bilady, Bilady" "بلادي، بلادي، بلادي" "My country, my country, my country"Capital and largest city Cairo 30°2′N 31°13′E / 30.033°N 31.217°E / 30.033; 31.217Official languages Arabic[a]National language Egyptian ArabicReligion90% Islam 9% Orthodox Christian 1% Other Christian[1]Demonym EgyptianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic• PresidentAbdel Fattah el-Sisi• Prime MinisterSherif IsmailLegislature House of RepresentativesEstablishment• Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt[2][3][b]c
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