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AD
The terms anno Domini[a][1][2] (AD) and before Christ[b][3][4][5] (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The term anno Domini is Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
and means "in the year of the Lord",[6] but is often presented using "our Lord" instead of "the Lord",[7][8] taken from the full original phrase "anno Domini nostri Jesu Christi", which translates to "in the year of our Lord Jesus
Jesus
Christ". This calendar era is based on the traditionally reckoned year of the conception or birth of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, with AD counting years from the start of this epoch, and BC denoting years before the start of the era. There is no year zero in this scheme, so the year AD 1 immediately follows the year 1 BC
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Dionysius Exiguus' Easter Table
Dionysius Exiguus's Easter
Easter
table was constructed in the year 525 by Dionysius Exiguus for the years 532–626. He obtained it from an Easter
Easter
table attributed to Patriarch Cyril of Alexandria
Cyril of Alexandria
for the years 437–531. The latter was constructed around the year 440 by means of extrapolation from an Alexandrian Easter
Easter
table constructed around the year 390 by Patriarch Theophilus of Alexandria
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Agostino Cornacchini
Agostino Cornacchini
Agostino Cornacchini
(August 27, 1686 – 1754) was an Italian sculptor and painter of the Rococo
Rococo
period, active mainly in Rome. He was born in Pescia
Pescia
and died in Rome. In 1712, Cornacchini established himself in the household of his uncle, Cardinal Carlo Agostino Fabbroni, who until 1720 provided Cornacchini with a studio, lodgings and an income
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Resurrection Of The Dead
— Events —Death Resurrection Last JudgementJewishMessianismBook of Daniel KabbalahTaoistLi HongZoroastrianFrashokereti SaoshyantInter-religiousEnd times Apocalypticism2012 phenomenonMillenarianism Last Judgment Resurrection
Resurrection
of the deadGog and Magog Messianic Agev t e Resurrection
Resurrection
of the dead, or resurrection from the dead (Koine: ἀνάστασις [τῶν] νεκρῶν, anastasis [ton] nekron; literally: "standing up again of the dead";[1] is a term frequently used in the New Testament
New Testament
and in the writings and doctrine and theology in other religions to describe an event by which a person, or people are resurrected (brought back to life)
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Leofranc Holford-Strevens
Leofranc Holford-Strevens (born 19 May 1946) is an English classical scholar and polymath, an authority on the works of Aulus Gellius, and a former reader for the Oxford University Press. He is married to the American musicologist Bonnie J. Blackburn.Contents1 Career 2 Languages 3 Selected publications 4 Citations4.1 ReferencesCareer[edit] After Southgate County Grammar School, in 1963 Holford-Strevens went up to Christ Church, Oxford, to read Literae Humaniores (a form of classical studies), and stayed on to obtain his doctorate there with a dissertation entitled Select Commentary on Aulus Gellius, Book 2 (1971). In 1971 Holford-Strevens started work with the Oxford University Press as a graduate proof reader and later rose to become consultant scholar-editor there. His first book-length publication, Aulus Gellius, was published in 1988
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Bonnie J. Blackburn
Bonnie Jean Blackburn (born July 15, 1939, Albany, New York) is an American musicologist. She graduated in 1970 from the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
with a PhD. She studied with Edward Lowinsky and Howard Mayer Brown. She was Lecturer at Northwestern University, and visiting faculty member at the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
in 1986, and University at Buffalo, The State University of New York in 1989–90. She moved to Oxford in 1990 and became a freelance editor.[1] She married Edward Lowinsky (d. 1985) and subsequently Leofranc Holford-Strevens. She is a corresponding member of the American Musicological Society.,[2] and was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2005.Contents1 Awards 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksAwards[edit]1988 Guggenheim FellowshipWorks[edit]The Oxford companion to the year, Bonnie J
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Flavius Anicius Probus Iunior
Flavius Probus iunior was a Roman Consul in 525. Bibliography[edit]Martindale, The Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire, "Fl. Probus iunior 10", Volume 2, 1980, p. 913.Political officesPreceded by Justin I, Venantius Opilio Consul of the Roman Empire 525 with Theodorus Philoxenus Soterichus Philoxenus Succeeded by OlybriusThis article about an Ancient Roman politician is a stub
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Anno Domini (other)
Anno Domini
Anno Domini
designates years since the traditional date of the birth of Jesus Christ. Anno Domini
Anno Domini
may also refer to:
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Hegira
The Hegira
Hegira
(also called Hijrah, Arabic: هِجْرَة‎) is the migration or journey of the Islamic prophet Muhammad and his followers from Mecca
Mecca
to Yathrib, later renamed by him to Medina, in the year 622.[1] In June 622, after being warned of a plot to assassinate him, Muhammad secretly left his home in
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Incarnation (Christianity)
In Christian theology, the doctrine of the Incarnation
Incarnation
holds that Jesus, the preexistent divine Logos ( Koine Greek
Koine Greek
for "Word") and the second hypostasis of the Trinity, God the Son
God the Son
and Son of the Father, taking on a human body and human nature, "was made flesh"[2] and conceived in the womb of Mary the Theotokos
Theotokos
(Greek for "God-bearer"; Latin: Mater Dei, lit. 'Mother of God'). The doctrine of the Incarnation, then, entails that Jesus
Jesus
Christ
Christ
is fully God and fully human, His two natures joined in hypostatic union. In the Incarnation, as traditionally defined by those Churches that adhere to the Council of Chalcedon, the divine nature of the Son was united but not mixed with human nature[3] in one divine Person, Jesus Christ, Who was both "truly God and truly man"
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Annunciation
The Annunciation
Annunciation
(from Latin
Latin
annuntiatio), also referred to as the Annunciation
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Old Testament
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t ePart of a series onChristianityJesus Christ Jesus
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Consul
Consul
Consul
(abbrev. cos.; Latin
Latin
plural consules) was the title of one of the chief magistrates of the Roman Republic, and subsequently a somewhat significant title under the Roman Empire. The title was also used in other city states and also revived in modern states, notably in the First French Republic. The relating adjective is consular, from the consularis.Contents1 Modern use of the term 2 Medieval city states 3 French Revolution3.1 French Republic 3.2 Roman Republic 3.3 Bolognese Republic4 Later modern republics4.1 Paraguay5 Other uses in antiquity5.1 Other city states 5.2 Private sphere 5.3 Revolutionary Greece6 See also 7 Sources and referencesModern use of the term[edit] Main article: Consul
Consul
(representative) In modern terminology, a consul is a type of diplomat
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Easter Table
Computus
Computus
( Latin
Latin
for "computation") is a calculation that determines the calendar date of Easter. Because the date is based on a calendar-dependent equinox rather than the astronomical one, there are differences between calculations done according to the Julian calendar and the modern Gregorian calendar. The name has been used for this procedure since the early Middle Ages, as it was considered the most important computation of the age. For most of their history Christians have calculated Easter independently of the Jewish calendar. In principle, Easter
Easter
falls on the Sunday following the full moon that follows the northern spring equinox (the paschal full moon). However, the vernal equinox and the full moon are not determined by astronomical observation
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ISO 8601
ISO 8601 Data elements and interchange formats – Information interchange – Representation of dates and times is an international standard covering the exchange of date- and time-related data. It was issued by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO) and was first published in 1988
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Bede
Bede
Bede
(/biːd/ BEED; Old English: Bǣda, Bēda; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as Saint Bede, Venerable
Venerable
Bede, and Bede
Bede
the Venerable (Latin: Bēda Venerābilis), was an English monk at the monastery of St. Peter and its companion monastery of St. Paul in the Kingdom of Northumbria of the Angles
Angles
(contemporarily Monkwearmouth– Jarrow
Jarrow
Abbey in Tyne and Wear, England). Born on lands likely belonging to the Monkwearmouth monastery, Bede
Bede
was sent there at the age of seven and later joined Abbot
Abbot
Ceolfrith
Ceolfrith
at the Jarrow
Jarrow
monastery, both of whom survived a plague that struck in 686, an outbreak that killed a majority of the population there
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