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Acklins
Acklins
Acklins
is an island and district of the Bahamas. It is one of a group of islands arranged along a large, shallow lagoon called the Bight of Acklins, of which the largest are Crooked Island (76 square miles (200 km2)) in the north and Acklins
Acklins
(120 square miles (310 km2)) in the southeast, and the smaller are Long Cay (once known as Fortune Island, (8 square miles (21 km2))) in the northwest, and Castle Island in the south. History[edit] The islands were settled by American Loyalists in the late 1780s who set up cotton plantations employing over 1,000 slaves. After the abolition of slavery in the British Empire
British Empire
the plantaions became uneconomical, and the replacement income from sponge diving has now dwindled as well with the rest of the natural sponge industry after the advent of synthetics
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National Geographic Society
The National Geographic
National Geographic
Society (NGS), headquartered in Washington, D.C., United States, is one of the largest non-profit scientific and educational institutions in the world. Founded in 1888, its interests include geography, archaeology and natural science, the promotion of environmental and historical conservation, and the study of world culture and history. The National Geographic
National Geographic
Society’s logo is a yellow portrait frame – rectangular in shape – which appears on the margins surrounding the front covers of its magazines and as its television channel logo
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Loyalist (American Revolution)
Loyalists were American colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War. At the time they were often called Tories, Royalists, or King's Men. They were opposed by the Patriots, those who supported the revolution and called them "persons inimical to the liberties of America".[1] Prominent Loyalists repeatedly assured the British government that many thousands of loyalists would spring to arms and fight for the crown. The British government acted in expectation of that, especially in the southern campaigns in 1780-81. In practice, the number of loyalists in military service was far lower than expected. Across the colonies, Patriots watched suspected Loyalists very closely, and would not tolerate any organized Loyalist opposition. Many outspoken or militarily active loyalists were forced to flee, especially to their stronghold of New York City
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Sponge
Sponges, the members of the phylum Porifera
Porifera
(/pɒˈrɪfərə/; meaning "pore bearer"), are a basal Metazoa
Metazoa
clade as sister of the Diploblasts.[1][2][3][4][5] They are multicellular organisms that have bodies full of pores and channels allowing water to circulate through them, consisting of jelly-like mesohyl sandwiched between two thin layers of cells. Sponges have unspecialized cells that can transform into other types and that often migrate between the main cell layers and the mesohyl in the process. Sponges do not have nervous, digestive or circulatory systems
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British Empire
The British Empire
Empire
comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states. It originated with the overseas possessions and trading posts established by England
England
between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. At its height, it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was the foremost global power.[1] By 1913, the British Empire
Empire
held sway over 412 million people, 7001230000000000000♠23% of the world population at the time,[2] and by 1920, it covered 35,500,000 km2 (13,700,000 sq mi),[3] 7001240000000000000♠24% of the Earth's total land area.[4] As a result, its political, legal, linguistic and cultural legacy is widespread
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Abolitionism In The United Kingdom
Abolitionism
Abolitionism
in the United Kingdom was the movement in the late 18th and early 19th centuries to end the practice of slavery, whether formal or informal, in the United Kingdom, the British Empire
British Empire
and the world, including ending the Atlantic slave trade. It was part of a wider abolitionism movement in Western Europe and the Americas. The buying and selling of slaves was made illegal across the British Empire in 1807, but owning slaves was permitted until it was outlawed completely in 1833, beginning a process where from 1834 slaves became indentured "apprentices" to their former owners until emancipation was achieved for the majority by 1840 and for remaining exceptions by 1843
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Slavery
Slavery
Slavery
is any system in which principles of property law are applied to people, allowing individuals to own, buy and sell other individuals, as a de jure form of property.[1] A slave is unable to withdraw unilaterally from such an arrangement and works without remuneration. Many scholars now use the term chattel slavery to refer to this specific sense of legalised, de jure slavery
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Bahamian Hutia
The Bahamian hutia or Ingraham's hutia (Geocapromys ingrahami) is a species of rodent in the family Capromyidae. Geocapromys ingrahami is endemic to the Bahamas. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, and rocky areas.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Behaviour 4 Status 5 See also 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] The Bahamian hutia is a rat-like rodent with a short tail and a body-length of up to 60 centimetres (24 in). Its fur varies in colour and can be black, brown, grey, white or reddish.[2] Distribution and habitat[edit] The Bahamian hutia is endemic to the Bahamas and is mostly found on East Plana Cay.[2] It was introduced into Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park in 1973.[3] Behaviour[edit] The Bahamian hutia is a nocturnal species, remaining underground during the day
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Cotton Plantation
A plantation is a large-scale farm that specializes in cash crops. The crops grown include cotton, coffee, tea, cocoa, sugar cane, sisal, oil seeds, oil palms, rubber trees, and fruits. Protectionist policies and natural comparative advantage have sometimes contributed to determining where plantations were located. A plantation house is the main house of a plantation, often a substantial farmhouse, which often serves as a symbol for the plantation as a whole. Plantation
Plantation
houses in the Southern United States and in other areas were often quite grand and expensive architectural works. Among the earliest examples of plantations were the latifundia of the Roman Empire, which produced large quantities of wine and olive oil for export. Plantation
Plantation
agriculture grew rapidly with the increase in international trade and the development of a worldwide economy that followed the expansion of European colonial empires
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Lagoon
A lagoon is a shallow body of water separated from a larger body of water by barrier islands or reefs. Lagoons are commonly divided into coastal lagoons and atoll lagoons. They have also been identified as occurring on mixed-sand and gravel coastlines. There is an overlap between bodies of water classified as coastal lagoons and bodies of water classified as estuaries. Lagoons are common coastal features around many parts of the world. Lagoons can also be man-made and used for wastewater treatment, as is the case for waste stabilization ponds.Contents1 Definition 2 Etymology 3 Atoll
Atoll
lagoons 4 Coastal lagoons 5 River-mouth lagoons on mixed sand and gravel beaches5.1 Hapua environment 5.2 Hapua characteristics 5.3 Hapua case study6 Images 7 See also 8 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Lagoons are shallow, often elongated bodies of water separated from a larger body of water by a shallow or exposed shoal, coral reef, or similar feature
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Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
is the second largest of the world's oceans with a total area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles).[2][3] It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa to the east, and the Americas to the west. As one component of the interconnected global ocean, it is connected in the north to the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the Pacific Ocean
Ocean
in the southwest, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
in the southeast, and the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
in the south (other definitions describe the Atlantic as extending southward to Antarctica)
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Hope Town
Hope Town
Hope Town
is one of the districts of the Bahamas, on the Abaco islands as well as a small village on Elbow Cay, located in Abaco. The area had a population of 458 in 2010.[1] Golf carts are the main source of transportation, and most of the supplies for the area are brought in by barge each week. In Hope Town, neither cars nor golf carts are permitted in the main part of town. Only bicycles and walking are permitted. Cars and golf carts are permitted on the outskirts of town, however. All the buildings that are built must adhere to Bahamian Architecture at the discretion of Town Planning
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Green Turtle Cay
Coordinates: 26°46′N 77°19′W / 26.767°N 77.317°W / 26.767; -77.317This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (January 2018) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Green Turtle Cay
Green Turtle Cay
is one of the barrier islands off mainland Great Abaco The Bahamas. It can only be reached via ferry from the mainland or boat. There is not an airport on the island. It is considered part of the "Abaco Out Islands" and is 3 miles (4.8 km) long and ½ mile wide. It was named after the once abundant green turtles that inhabited the area. In 1977, Key West, Florida became a sister city to New Plymouth, Green Turtle Cay's village.[1] The population of the island is about 450 and its main settlement is New Plymouth which was founded in the 18th century
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Grand Cay
Grand Cay
Grand Cay
is one of the districts of the Bahamas, in the Abaco islands. Grand Cay
Grand Cay
is a small island or cay situated south of Walker's Cay
Walker's Cay
in the Bahamas
Bahamas
Islands. It is a settlement of Abaco, a major island of the Bahamas. After a hurricane's devastation of Walker's Cay, and other matters, Walker's Cay's workers were forced to go back to Grand Cay to seek employment. Previously, Grand Cay
Grand Cay
was seen as a base or home; but presently it is an island containing the main occupations and housing. It has a population of 383.(2010 census)[1] Grand Cay
Grand Cay
is notable for being a tourists' haven, and a peaceful, fishing community. Its number one attraction is "Rosie's Place". Patrons can still sample the combo of Cracked Conch, Lobster Tail and Grilled Grouper
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Long Island, Bahamas
Long Island
Island
is an island in the Bahamas
Bahamas
that is split by the Tropic of Cancer.[1] Its capital is Clarence Town. Long Island
Island
is one of the Districts of the Bahamas
Bahamas
and is known as the most scenic island in the Bahamas. The population is 3,094 inhabitants.[2]Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Settlements 4 Economy and tourism 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] Long Island
Island
is about 130 kilometers (80 mi) long and 6 km (4 mi) wide at its widest point. The land area is 596 km2 (230 sq mi). Long Island
Island
is situated about 265 km (165 mi) southeast of the Bahamian capital of Nassau, which is located on the island of New Providence
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Moore's Island
Coordinates: 26°18′N 77°33′W / 26.300°N 77.550°W / 26.300; -77.550The Location of the District of Moore's Island Moore's Island
Moore's Island
is one of the districts of the Bahamas, on the Abaco Islands. Moore's Island
Moore's Island
is one of the little cays off the main land of Abaco. It is approximately 7 miles (11 km) long and 3.5 miles (5.6 km) wide and approximately 28 miles (45 km) from Great Abaco. It has two settlements, Hard Bargain which is the capital and the other settlement is the Bight. To arrive to Moore's Island
Moore's Island
by boat traveling from Sandy Point one passes Gorda Cay
Cay
(Castaway Cay); Long Rock can be passed on either side, staying offshore in deep waters because inland passage is too risky. Then one passes south Channel Cay
Cay
(Stake Cay) which has a light tower
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