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5-simplex
In five-dimensional geometry , a 5-simplex
5-simplex
is a self-dual regular 5-polytope . It has six vertices , 15 edges , 20 triangle faces , 15 tetrahedral cells , and 6 5-cell facets . It has a dihedral angle of cos−1(1/5), or approximately 78.46°. CONTENTS * 1 Alternate names * 2 Regular hexateron cartesian coordinates * 3 Projected images * 4 Related uniform 5-polytopes * 5 Other forms * 6 Notes * 7 References * 8 External links ALTERNATE NAMESIt can also be called a HEXATERON, or HEXA-5-TOPE, as a 6-facetted polytope in 5-dimensions. The name hexateron is derived from hexa- for having six facets and teron (with ter- being a corruption of tetra- ) for having four-dimensional facets. By Jonathan Bowers, a hexateron is given the acronym HIX
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Uniform 5-polytope
In geometry , a UNIFORM 5-POLYTOPE is a five-dimensional uniform polytope . By definition, a uniform 5-polytope is vertex-transitive and constructed from uniform 4-polytope facets . The complete set of CONVEX UNIFORM 5-POLYTOPES has not been determined, but most can be made as Wythoff constructions from a small set of symmetry groups . These construction operations are represented by the permutations of rings of the Coxeter diagrams
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Schläfli Symbol
In geometry , the SCHLäFLI SYMBOL is a notation of the form {p,q,r,...} that defines regular polytopes and tessellations . The Schläfli symbol
Schläfli symbol
is named after the 19th-century Swiss mathematician Ludwig Schläfli , who made important contributions in geometry and other areas
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Coxeter Diagram
In geometry , a COXETER–DYNKIN DIAGRAM (or COXETER DIAGRAM, COXETER GRAPH) is a graph with numerically labeled edges (called BRANCHES) representing the spatial relations between a collection of mirrors (or reflecting hyperplanes ). It describes a kaleidoscopic construction: each graph "node" represents a mirror (domain facet ) and the label attached to a branch encodes the dihedral angle order between two mirrors (on a domain ridge ). An unlabeled branch implicitly represents order-3. Each diagram represents a Coxeter group , and Coxeter groups are classified by their associated diagrams. Dynkin diagrams are closely related objects, which differ from Coxeter diagrams in two respects: firstly, branches labeled "4" or greater are directed , while Coxeter diagrams are undirected ; secondly, Dynkin diagrams must satisfy an additional (crystallographic ) restriction, namely that the only allowed branch labels are 2, 3, 4, and 6
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Pentachoron
In geometry , the 5-CELL is a four-dimensional object bounded by 5 tetrahedral cells . It is also known as a C5, PENTACHORON, PENTATOPE, PENTAHEDROID, or TETRAHEDRAL PYRAMID . It is a 4-SIMPLEX , the simplest possible convex regular 4-polytope (four-dimensional analogue of a Platonic solid ), and is analogous to the tetrahedron in three dimensions and the triangle in two dimensions. The pentachoron is a four dimensional pyramid with a tetrahedral base. The REGULAR 5-CELL is bounded by regular tetrahedra , and is one of the six regular convex 4-polytopes , represented by Schläfli symbol {3,3,3}
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Tetrahedron
In geometry , a TETRAHEDRON (plural: TETRAHEDRA or TETRAHEDRONS), also known as a TRIANGULAR PYRAMID, is a polyhedron composed of four triangular faces , six straight edges , and four vertex corners . The tetrahedron is the simplest of all the ordinary convex polyhedra and the only one that has fewer than 5 faces. The tetrahedron is the three-dimensional case of the more general concept of a Euclidean simplex , and may thus also be called a 3-SIMPLEX. The tetrahedron is one kind of pyramid , which is a polyhedron with a flat polygon base and triangular faces connecting the base to a common point. In the case of a tetrahedron the base is a triangle (any of the four faces can be considered the base), so a tetrahedron is also known as a "triangular pyramid". Like all convex polyhedra , a tetrahedron can be folded from a single sheet of paper. It has two such nets
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Triangle
A TRIANGLE is a polygon with three edges and three vertices . It is one of the basic shapes in geometry . A triangle with vertices _A_, _B_, and _C_ is denoted A B C {displaystyle triangle ABC} . In Euclidean geometry any three points, when non-collinear, determine a unique triangle and a unique plane (i.e. a two-dimensional Euclidean space ). This article is about triangles in Euclidean geometry except where otherwise noted
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Vertex Figure
In geometry , a VERTEX FIGURE, broadly speaking, is the figure exposed when a corner of a polyhedron or polytope is sliced off. CONTENTS* 1 Definitions – theme and variations * 1.1 As a flat slice * 1.2 As a spherical polygon * 1.3 As the set of connected vertices * 1.4 Abstract definition * 2 General properties * 3 Dorman Luke construction * 4 Regular polytopes * 5 An example vertex figure of a honeycomb * 6 Edge figure * 7 See also * 8 References * 8.1 Notes * 8.2 Bibliography * 9 External links DEFINITIONS – THEME AND VARIATIONSTake some vertex of a polyhedron. Mark a point somewhere along each connected edge. Draw lines across the connected faces, joining adjacent points. When done, these lines form a complete circuit, i.e. a polygon, around the vertex. This polygon is the vertex figure. More precise formal definitions can vary quite widely, according to circumstance. For example Coxeter (e.g
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5-cell
In geometry , the 5-CELL is a four-dimensional object bounded by 5 tetrahedral cells . It is also known as a C5, PENTACHORON, PENTATOPE, PENTAHEDROID, or TETRAHEDRAL PYRAMID . It is a 4-SIMPLEX , the simplest possible convex regular 4-polytope (four-dimensional analogue of a Platonic solid
Platonic solid
), and is analogous to the tetrahedron in three dimensions and the triangle in two dimensions. The pentachoron is a four dimensional pyramid with a tetrahedral base. The REGULAR 5-CELL is bounded by regular tetrahedra , and is one of the six regular convex 4-polytopes , represented by Schläfli symbol {3,3,3}
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Coxeter Group
In mathematics , a COXETER GROUP, named after H. S. M. Coxeter , is an abstract group that admits a formal description in terms of reflections (or kaleidoscopic mirrors ). Indeed, the finite Coxeter groups are precisely the finite Euclidean reflection groups ; the symmetry groups of regular polyhedra are an example. However, not all Coxeter groups are finite, and not all can be described in terms of symmetries and Euclidean reflections. Coxeter groups were introduced (Coxeter 1934 ) as abstractions of reflection groups , and finite Coxeter groups were classified in 1935 (Coxeter 1935 )
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Convex Polytope
A CONVEX POLYTOPE is a special case of a polytope , having the additional property that it is also a convex set of points in the _n_-dimensional space R_n_. Some authors use the terms "convex polytope" and "CONVEX POLYHEDRON" interchangeably, while others prefer to draw a distinction between the notions of a polyhedron and a polytope. In addition, some texts require a polytope to be a bounded set , while others (including this article) allow polytopes to be unbounded. The terms "bounded/unbounded convex polytope" will be used below whenever the boundedness is critical to the discussed issue. Yet other texts treat a convex _n_-polytope as a surface or (_n_-1)-manifold. Convex polytopes play an important role both in various branches of mathematics and in applied areas, most notably in linear programming . A comprehensive and influential book in the subject, called _Convex Polytopes_, was published in 1967 by Branko Grünbaum
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Isogonal Figure
In geometry , a polytope (a polygon , polyhedron or tiling, for example) is ISOGONAL or VERTEX-TRANSITIVE if, loosely speaking, all its vertices are equivalent. That implies that each vertex is surrounded by the same kinds of face in the same or reverse order, and with the same angles between corresponding faces. Technically, we say that for any two vertices there exists a symmetry of the polytope mapping the first isometrically onto the second. Other ways of saying this are that the group of automorphisms of the polytope is _transitive on its vertices_, or that the vertices lie within a single _symmetry orbit _. All vertices of a finite _n_-dimensional isogonal figure exist on an (n-1)-sphere . The term ISOGONAL has long been used for polyhedra. VERTEX-TRANSITIVE is a synonym borrowed from modern ideas such as symmetry groups and graph theory
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Regular Polytope
In mathematics , a REGULAR POLYTOPE is a polytope whose symmetry group acts transitively on its flags , thus giving it the highest degree of symmetry. All its elements or j-faces (for all 0 ≤ j ≤ n, where n is the dimension of the polytope) — cells, faces and so on — are also transitive on the symmetries of the polytope, and are regular polytopes of dimension ≤ n. Regular polytopes are the generalized analog in any number of dimensions of regular polygons (for example, the square or the regular pentagon) and regular polyhedra (for example, the cube ). The strong symmetry of the regular polytopes gives them an aesthetic quality that interests both non-mathematicians and mathematicians. Classically, a regular polytope in n dimensions may be defined as having regular facets and regular vertex figures . These two conditions are sufficient to ensure that all faces are alike and all vertices are alike
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Self-dual
In mathematics , a DUALITY, generally speaking, translates concepts, theorems or mathematical structures into other concepts, theorems or structures, in a one-to-one fashion, often (but not always) by means of an involution operation: if the dual of A is B, then the dual of B is A. Such involutions sometimes have fixed points , so that the dual of A is A itself. For example, Desargues\' theorem is self-dual in this sense under the standard duality in projective geometry . In mathematical contexts, duality has numerous meanings although it is "a very pervasive and important concept in (modern) mathematics" and "an important general theme that has manifestations in almost every area of mathematics". Many mathematical dualities between objects of two types correspond to pairings , bilinear functions from an object of one type and another object of the second type to some family of scalars
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Five-dimensional Space
A FIVE-DIMENSIONAL SPACE is a space with five dimensions . If interpreted physically, that is one more than the usual three spatial dimensions and the fourth dimension of time used in relativitistic physics . It is an abstraction which occurs frequently in mathematics, where it is a legitimate construct. In physics and mathematics , a sequence of N numbers can be understood to represent a location in an N-dimensional space . Whether or not the universe is five-dimensional is a topic of debate. CONTENTS * 1 Physics
Physics
* 2 Five-dimensional geometry * 2.1 Polytopes * 2.2 Hypersphere * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 Further reading * 6 External links PHYSICSMuch of the early work on five dimensional space was in an attempt to develop a theory that unifies the four fundamental forces in nature: strong and weak nuclear forces, gravity and electromagnetism
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Geometry
GEOMETRY (from the Ancient Greek : γεωμετρία; _geo-_ "earth", _-metron_ "measurement") is a branch of mathematics concerned with questions of shape, size, relative position of figures, and the properties of space. A mathematician who works in the field of geometry is called a geometer . Geometry arose independently in a number of early cultures as a practical way for dealing with lengths , areas , and volumes . Geometry began to see elements of formal mathematical science emerging in the West as early as the 6th century BC. By the 3rd century BC, geometry was put into an axiomatic form by Euclid , whose treatment, Euclid\'s _Elements_ , set a standard for many centuries to follow. Geometry arose independently in India, with texts providing rules for geometric constructions appearing as early as the 3rd century BC
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